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What are your strategies for long term survival of your p...
  
 
David Baldwin
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p.1 #1 · What are your strategies for long term survival of your photography?


On the wall of my living room I have a framed family portrait from around 1900. I look at this image most days and it makes me think about the future of our photography after we have gone.

We spend 1000s of hours of our lives on our photography and I assume some of us would like our work to survive us in some form, whether print, digital files or web assets. How are YOU going to make sure your work survives you in some way?

Don't mean to sound morbid, but I would genuinely like to understand how you envisage the future of your work? Or doesn't it matter? Don't mean to take up a contentious position, but we plan ahead for our families and our country, how are we planning ahead for our photographic legacy, however modest it will be for most of us!



Mar 22, 2014 at 12:10 AM
cwebster
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p.1 #2 · What are your strategies for long term survival of your photography?


I don't care about the future of my work. I'll be dead. If someone else care, so be it, and good luck to them.

Only one photo my father took has any emotional significance to me, and that was a print that hung on our wall from the time of his death (1955) until the late 60's when the house was sold. That photo convinced me that I should become a photographer.

I don't have any such hopes for my work.

<Chas>



Mar 22, 2014 at 04:08 AM
markd61
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p.1 #3 · What are your strategies for long term survival of your photography?


I too do not care.
The work I make is the best I can make but it is still just grist for the mills of commerce. There are billions of images made daily. Many of them are far better than mine.
My family may want to keep some but not for artistic reasons but for their content. That, IMO, is how it should be.



Mar 27, 2014 at 05:05 PM
rodmcwha
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p.1 #4 · What are your strategies for long term survival of your photography?


Funny--I care deeply. I have spent the last 11 years documenting Irish music and the people who keep it alive. I don't care , too much, if I am remembered, but i very much want this history to survive.
I have a good friend, an author and publisher who has agreed o be curator of the work. We each have multiple backups, in multiple locations.
Maybe this is the difference between photography as a JOB! and as a passion.



Apr 03, 2014 at 04:24 PM
 

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JWilsonphoto
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p.1 #5 · What are your strategies for long term survival of your photography?


Interesting thought Rod, I don't particularly care about my commercial work (but there are 300+ clients who have invested millions in it over the last three decades, so they probably care), but my landscapes, my aviation work, and the tens of thousands of family images are very important to me. I have them archived in three locations, approximately 120TB (at this point) in each location. They are organized very well so anyone could open up the files and find what they were looking for. To those of us who have people who care about us and what we've accomplished/documented with our talents, those images will likely take on more significance after we're no longer here. It's my job, but it was my passion first, and still is.


Apr 27, 2014 at 08:44 PM
pipspeak
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p.1 #6 · What are your strategies for long term survival of your photography?


Photos with historical significance aside (of which I have none as far as I know) I also don't care about what happens to my images when I'm gone and, to be honest, IMO it would be slightly self absorbed if I did.

Just as I have made efforts to save previous generations' photos that I find interesting (and previous generations have not made this easy in many cases) I'm sure the next generations will save whatever images of mine they find interesting. My opinion is irrelevant when it comes to determining what someone else regards as worth preserving.




Apr 27, 2014 at 09:06 PM
Monito
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p.1 #7 · What are your strategies for long term survival of your photography?


Post your work on the internet if you want it to be immortal.

Old photos on the internet don't fade away. They just become harder to search for.



Apr 27, 2014 at 09:48 PM
mshi
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p.1 #8 · What are your strategies for long term survival of your photography?


ďArt is either plagiarism or revolution."

You want to achieve immortality in the artworld? Start a visual revolution. Technically perfect photographs are very boring because every camera along with Photoshop can do that.



Apr 28, 2014 at 07:02 AM





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