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Color, white balance, colour cast
  
 
YonathanZ
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Color, white balance, colour cast


Hi,

I use a grey card to set the right white balance in Lightroom and it does wonders to make the colours look better and not too warm or cold. I heard about another device called "colour passport" or something like that, and I don't know what it does or how it differs from using a grey card. I did notice that some of my images require making the blacks more blacks for them to look more like they looked in real life (for example, I shot some dogs yesterday and the black dog didn't look black enough when I imported the image, and that's after correcting the white balance). Is this what colour passports are helpful with?

Another question - there was a red-colored ceiling where I shot some cats, and one of the black cats got a very noticeable red cast all over his body in the photo (after correcting white balance) - how would you fix such a problem (assuming you just HAVE to shoot under that ceiling)?

Thanks.



Mar 17, 2014 at 08:48 PM
James_N
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Color, white balance, colour cast


You're thinking about the X-Rite ColorChecker Passport. Here's a review that should answer your questions: http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/reviews/photography/colorchecker-passport_1.html


Mar 17, 2014 at 09:27 PM
howardm4
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Color, white balance, colour cast


question #2: I'd use the selective brush, click on the color box to bring up the color picker and drag the cursor over to the cat. you should be able to select the color of the cat (which isn't the black it should be). Then add or subtract 180 from the hue angle window to get the complementary color and brush that over the cat to neutralize the tint.


Mar 17, 2014 at 09:41 PM
 

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Eyeball
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Color, white balance, colour cast


In addition to white balance, you can use the Passport or classic Color Checker chart to calibrate your camera's color response and create custom profiles for use with software like Photoshop or Lightroom.

They can also help with avoiding clipping of shadow and highlight values by using the white and black squares on the chart - especially highlights since you can look for "blinkies" in the light squares of the chart. Of course, you may still have scenes where the dynamic range of the scene exceeds the capabilities of the camera and where sacrifices will still need to be made.

Color casts coming from near-by objects (a ceiling in your case; another example is green grass or foliage) are usually handled with local adjustments but in some circumstances can be handled globally.

If the cast impacts everything in the scene, you can just do a global white balance adjustment. When using the Passport or Color Checker, you would just make sure the chart was reflecting that same cast so you can correct it properly later.

For cases where the cast is impacting only certain elements of the scene, you will need to use a local adjustment. This could be the adjustment brush in Lightroom or and adjustment layer with mask in Photoshop.

Just how picky you need to be regarding cast removal is somewhat subjective. Sometimes it's the cast that provides character or clues as to where or when the photo was taken. Using a color chart often gives you a useful benchmark to refer to though, even if you ultimately choose to partially or totally ignore it for the final image.



Mar 17, 2014 at 09:43 PM
YonathanZ
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Color, white balance, colour cast


howardm4 wrote:
question #2: I'd use the selective brush, click on the color box to bring up the color picker and drag the cursor over to the cat. you should be able to select the color of the cat (which isn't the black it should be). Then add or subtract 180 from the hue angle window to get the complementary color and brush that over the cat to neutralize the tint.


I'm kind of failing at doing this. I selected the adjustment brush and then used the colour picker to pick the colour I want to paint (the black fur of the cat that doesn't have the red tint to it), but when I start painting over with it it seems to paint a different colour.




Mar 17, 2014 at 10:10 PM
howardm4
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Color, white balance, colour cast


no, to remove a color cast, you want to paint w/ the complementary color (set aside the 'blackness' for now). if the color is, say pure red, then you would need to paint pure cyan over it. that would turn the red to grey.


Mar 17, 2014 at 10:30 PM





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