Home · Register · Search · View Winners · Software · Hosting · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Hendrik, Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Post-processing & Printing | Join Upload & Sell

  

Use Crashplan prior to NAS install?
  
 
lighthawk
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #1 · Use Crashplan prior to NAS install?


Anyone here use Crashplan? I've just been researching, and it seems like a heck of a deal at $59 for unlimited storage, albeit from one computer.

I'm asking because I'm finally consolidating a bunch of external HDD and looking at a two or four disk NAS.
I'm interested in remote access, since I work from my office and home. This Synology DS214Play with 2x3TB looks like it would work in a RAID 1 config (keeping it simple for a newbie like myself) with 3TB available. Since I've only shot heavy (750/GB/year) for the last three years, I could store everything from 2008 - 2014 within the 3TB. Eventually, I assume I would buy another set of two disks (4TB) and keep only three years at fingertips, plus a collection of best photos.

My thoughts are to subscribe to Crashplan, upload all of my drives to the cloud, then install my first NAS. If I screw up, I should still have my external drives and cloud backup. Thoughts?



Mar 12, 2014 at 04:32 PM
Eyeball
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #2 · Use Crashplan prior to NAS install?


Some things to check:

- My understanding is that some of these "unlimited", "1 computer" plans don't back up remote drives so you may want to double-check the fine print or contact their customer service area to make sure they will back-up your NAS in the configuration you are planning to use (connected directly to PC vs. via LAN).

- The typical upload speed you get from your ISP (often times much less than download) is critical for this. Do some calculations to estimate how long it will take a full back-up to be achieved.

- I don't have experience with Crashplan but I am very skeptical of these "unlimited" plans. It is very likely that they will throttle your upload and download speeds at some point. Check the fine print or ask specific questions to customer service regarding throttling. Check through review sites, too. Sometimes customer service and restore reliability suffers with these "too good to be true" services.




Mar 12, 2014 at 05:13 PM
howardm4
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #3 · Use Crashplan prior to NAS install?


you really want to take the crashplan speed test (or backblaze or whatever). that is a lot of data and will take a fair amount of time. Personally I think it's overkill but thats just MO


Mar 12, 2014 at 05:32 PM
DanBrown
Online
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #4 · Use Crashplan prior to NAS install?


I use Crashplan to backup two computers. I can tell you for certain that if you can mount the drive to the desktop, so that it appears as a volume, you can backup either a NAS drive or an external drive. The initial backup to Crashplan can take a very long time - think days or even weeks - depending upon the amount of data that you are storing. The subsequent backups include only changed data and occurs in the background.



Mar 12, 2014 at 08:16 PM
lighthawk
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #5 · Use Crashplan prior to NAS install?


Thanks Howard and Eyeball.

Digging a bit deeper, I see that Crashplan has a number of folks unhappy with upload speeds and re-scanning of of your drives when you make a change.
Guess it's not the silver bullet I was hoping for.

My primary backup will be NAS, but perhaps I'll stick with the rotate disks to other physical location method.



Mar 12, 2014 at 08:22 PM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



Brit-007
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #6 · Use Crashplan prior to NAS install?


A True backup to cloud plan makes the cost of a NAS cheap. There are companies out there that will provide a backup solution to the Cloud but we are talking about $1k per year.


Mar 12, 2014 at 10:43 PM
DanBrown
Online
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #7 · Use Crashplan prior to NAS install?


lighthawk wrote:
Digging a bit deeper, I see that Crashplan has a number of folks unhappy with upload speeds and re-scanning of of your drives when you make a change.


First, Crashplan has a free trial period, so it would be better to try it yourself rather than rely on the opinion of others. I'm a satisfied user of Crashplan.
Second, upload speeds are more a function of your ISP than Crashplan. If you are on a lower speed service, it will take longer.
Third, re-scanning of the drives when you make a change does occur. But how often do you do that? I have mine set to backup using a folder hierarchy. New folders are added as subfolders where the parent folder is set to backup. This avoids rescanning of the drives. I've only rescanned my drives about 3 times in the last year. It does require some thought when you initially set it up.



Mar 13, 2014 at 01:50 AM
lighthawk
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #8 · Use Crashplan prior to NAS install?


DanBrown wrote:
^^^This^^^
Thanks, Dan. This is exactly the sort of information I was hoping to learn and share with this thread.

I'm realizing my idea of backing up my multi-drive storage before committing the NAS is probably not going to work with Crashplan. As it stands, everything I have is either duplicated, if not triplicated on a variety of external drives ranging from 500mb to 2TB. Moving to a NAS makes sense, and this is new to me, so I'm doing my best to learn what works and what has not been effective.

The suggestion to run a trial with CP is
...Show more



Mar 13, 2014 at 03:03 AM
pipspeak
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #9 · Use Crashplan prior to NAS install?


I believe the Crashplan utility actually runs on Synology NAS units independently, which would solve your problem (back up to the NAS then let the NAS do its thing over time with Crashplan).

I've been using Crashplan over the course of the last two years and have had no problems. The initial backup was certainly not fast (took me about a week to get 500GB up there), but I doubt it's any faster with other consumer or small business backup plans. And with the utility running 24/7 on the NAS it's not something you will have to worry about. Once my initial backup was done, however, incremental additions seem to be very fast and every morning my backup is usually at 99% or 100%.



Mar 24, 2014 at 12:05 AM
amacal1
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #10 · Use Crashplan prior to NAS install?


My new QNAP nas appears to have a crashplan app available. Presumably this runs on the NAS and syncs it with Crashplan. I wonder if it would count as your "one computer"?


Mar 28, 2014 at 02:00 AM





FM Forums | Post-processing & Printing | Join Upload & Sell

    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Retrive password