Home · Register · Search · View Winners · Software · Hosting · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Lighting & Studio Techniques | Join Upload & Sell

  

recommended light for light painting
  
 
ksubrama
Online
• •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #1 · recommended light for light painting


I am looking for good flashlights that can be used for light painting the scene during night photography. I think there are specific considerations with the different types of lights producing bluer vs warmer tones and incandescent vs LED etc.

Any recommendations from experienced night photographers out there?

Thanks in advance.



Dec 14, 2013 at 06:01 PM
amacal1
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #2 · recommended light for light painting


You may consider having more than one light color available. If there are any light sources visible in the shot, you could attempt to match their output color. I have no experience, it's just an idea.


Dec 14, 2013 at 10:13 PM
BigIronCruiser
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #3 · recommended light for light painting


The size of the object could make a difference when choosing the size of the light, but I formed a snoot over the end of a small Maglite to paint my Harley. Whatever source you choose, you should be able to achieve the correct white balance using a grey card.


Dec 14, 2013 at 11:40 PM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



ksubrama
Online
• •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #4 · recommended light for light painting


Thanks for the input. I think I should've been more specific. My general use case would be lighting a landscape. So, the subject is typically not very small. It might be a building or a tree or even a general landscape.


Dec 14, 2013 at 11:55 PM
BigIronCruiser
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #5 · recommended light for light painting


That's a different scenario. I've seen it done using speedlights and/or studio strobes. The technique was to put a camera on a tripod and take multiple shots. The lights were moved between shots to illuminate various parts of the building and surrounding landscape. Layers and masks were then used to create the finished product.


Dec 15, 2013 at 05:15 AM
Roland W
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #6 · recommended light for light painting


One big issue with light painting is accidently lighting parts of the scene that you do not want lit, or do not want brightly lit. Besides a variety of objects that may show up different than you desire, the worst problem can be the ground in front of you. Another issue can be not getting your subject evenly lit, where you can end up with blotches or streaks.

A typical flashlight with a narrow or very spot type beam also has a lot of light that spills out to the sides, so you end up with a light source that has one tight beam, and a secondary beam around it that is very wide. For use as a flashlight, that is usually desirable, so that you can see at your feet while searching in the distance for the trail or some object. When you use such a light to light paint a somewhat distant object, the ground in front of you that is in the secondary beam can easily become over exposed.

One way to reduce the secondary beam is to add a cone or nozzle on the flashlight, which will still allow the main beam to work well, especially if you want a very tight beam. But few flashlights offer a nozzle or cone attachment, so you likely will need to make something. But adding a nozzle is a compromise, and if you end up with a tight beam, it can be very difficult to apply the light painting in a uniform manner without getting streaks.

Without me actually looking for a flashlight to use for light painting, someone showed me one that seems perfect. The light brand is "Lenser", and they offer models that have a feature called "Advanced Focus System" that provides an adjustable beam pattern over a wide range of size. It uses an optical system that provides very uniform light over the adjusted beam size, but it also has a side benefit of almost no side spill. So you get the great feature of being able to adjust the beam to well match your subject, and at the same time you almost totally eliminate the secondary wide beam that can really mess up a lot of light painting scenes.

Lenser offers a range of flashlights with different light outputs. I chose a fairly strong light, and in my case I also desired it to use AA cells because I have a lot rechargeable AA's for speedlight and other uses. The model I bought is shown in this Amazon link:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0053HCNGY/ref=oh_details_o04_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I am amazed at how sharp a cutoff the beam edge has, and how very uniform the light is within the beam. And the spill light outside the beam is indeed very low. I guess you could add a nozzle to cut it even further, but I have not yet found the need. This flashlight is fairly new to me, but for the times I have used it for light painting, it has worked very well. Lenser offers lower cost lights with less light output, and also higher output and rechargeable lights. The cost is on the expensive side compared to other flashlights with out the special focusable, but for light painting use, I highly recommend this series of lights.

The M14 model I got with its 220 lumens may be too bright to use for some light painting projects, in order to have enough time to paint, and still balance with the exposure of the rest of the scene. I may even consider getting another smaller model Lenser to fill that need. Another thought I had was to temporally add a neutral density filter on the front to cut the light level for the situations that need less light.



Dec 15, 2013 at 05:45 PM





FM Forums | Lighting & Studio Techniques | Join Upload & Sell

    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Retrive password