Home · Register · Search · View Winners · Software · Hosting · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | General Gear-talk | Join Upload & Sell

1      
2
       end
  

Archive 2013 · What is your best hiking tripod?
  
 
Chris Anthony
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #1 · p.2 #1 · What is your best hiking tripod?


The best hiking tripod?
The one your willing to strap to your backpack and carry all day. I agree with killersnowman, the pack will make a greater impact here then 1lb of tripod weight.



Oct 05, 2013 at 02:30 AM
Steve Walker
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #2 · p.2 #2 · What is your best hiking tripod?


I have had a Feisol CT 3442 for over a year now. It is light enough and stable enough for my hiking needs. I highly recommend it.

I purchased the center column also, just in case I ever find a need for it. So far, I have taken a few test shots with the center column, but have not found a need for it in the field.

Things I like are weight, stability, quality, price, and customer service.

The circumference is a bit large, but that is not a problem for me. I am more concerned about weight and capability.

The leg locks are not quite up to the standard of my Gitzo 3 and 5 series tripods, but they are plenty good enough for my hiking needs. They are actually easier to operate, but in my opinion don't form as stable of a joint when locked.

Overall, I am very pleased with the CT 3442. If something happened to it, I would buy another CT 3442 to replace it.

Steve




Oct 05, 2013 at 04:55 AM
Erik_J
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #3 · p.2 #3 · What is your best hiking tripod?


I like the Feisol CT3441S tripod. The leg locks are not as good as the Gitzo tripods. But other than that it's a very nice tripod


Oct 05, 2013 at 06:58 AM
RobDickinson
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #4 · p.2 #4 · What is your best hiking tripod?


Steve, Eric thanks that helps!

Chris Assume we have the best pack and a maximum weight to carry a lighter but stable tripod is always good.

Yes we could all hike with 10kgs of tripod but when we go looking for new expensive gear for a specific purpose it helps if its right...



Oct 05, 2013 at 07:35 AM
lighthawk
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #5 · p.2 #5 · What is your best hiking tripod?


I just ordered the Berlebach 50031, which is more of a table top pod, so maybe not what you are seeking.
The size is minimal, only 10.6" folded. It will go almost to the ground, 2.6" to 13.8" tall (plus head and camera).

I use a smaller LowePro Flipside 10L, which will make it very reasonable for mushroom hikes, or taking landscapes (just find a rock to put it on). I haven't used the tripod yet, but it seems very solid, rated for 17 pounds. I've got the smallest RRS head, the BH-25 and B2 mini-clamp, which I plan to move onto the Berlebach when it arrives. I think it will support my 6D + 14mm Bower, or hopefully 6D + 100 macro combinations.

I also agree that a comfortable pack will make a huge difference in comfort when carrying several lenses, tripod, accessories, water, food, etc. BTW, the Flipside series allows for a water bladder, which you definitely need if you are doing the Grand Canyon. Have a great trip!



Oct 05, 2013 at 04:52 PM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



killersnowman
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #6 · p.2 #6 · What is your best hiking tripod?




unclemikey wrote:
Take a look at this link for the N-1204. I use it all the time. It has a 39LB load rating and I've used it with the Nikon 70-200 f;2.8G VRII and the Sigma 50-500 f:4.5/5.6 APO DG OS HSM with a Tomahawk gimbal by ProMedia Gear. Works great.

http://www.argraph.com/Sirui-N-Tripod-Series.html


The Sirui maximum weight statements are greatly exaggerated. I have used and own a Sirui T2205x. Its "rated" for 26.5lbs and yes it probably can hold that but it iant stable. I used a canon 5d2 and a 17-40 on it and the mirror slap would send vibrations down all the legs. It was impossible to use with the 135/2

Stability is not equal to load limits



Oct 06, 2013 at 05:40 PM
unclemikey
Online
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #7 · p.2 #7 · What is your best hiking tripod?


killersnowman wrote:
The Sirui maximum weight statements are greatly exaggerated. I have used and own a Sirui T2205x. Its "rated" for 26.5lbs and yes it probably can hold that but it iant stable. I used a canon 5d2 and a 17-40 on it and the mirror slap would send vibrations down all the legs. It was impossible to use with the 135/2

Stability is not equal to load limits


Killersnowman, I agree with you regarding the T-series Sirui. That is why when deciding to give these legs a try I opted for the N-series. The legs have a greater diameter and offer more stability. Now if we consider recorded load ratings I agree with you again. However that doesn't matter to me because with the Sigma BigMa on a gripped d71K we're dealing with about a third of the weight rating. I've not had problems with vibrations in any of the N-series tripods perhaps because I don't ask them to do more than they can. You can promote Gitzo or RRS or any other brand but if you are judging equal size and leg diameter the Sirui are just as good as any other brand out there.



Oct 07, 2013 at 01:22 PM
wuxiekeji
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #8 · p.2 #8 · What is your best hiking tripod?


Laugh at me if you will, but for hiking I usually travel light -- usually a Manfrotto 709B table-top tripod which I have thoroughly beaten up and is still working great. Can stuff it in my pocket or even leave it connected to the camera for the whole hike. At least in the areas I hike it's pretty easy to find high enough rocks to prop it on, and I can even do tack sharp several-second exposures by pressing the legs against a rock wall or railing or strong tree with one hand, and using a remote, 2-second mode, or magic lantern clap mode with the other hand (or scream/growl at the camera which will also trigger the shutter with ML).

A monopod hiking stick complements nicely for situations where I need only stability and height (e.g. wildlife, macros) but can't find an object nearby, and since I need a hiking stick anyway it doesn't add any weight. Can't do long exposures with the monopod of course, but it's very rare that I encounter a situation where I need long exposure landscapes AND can't find an object to prop my 709B on. YMMV depending on what kind of place you hike in.

Edited on Oct 23, 2013 at 03:32 PM · View previous versions



Oct 07, 2013 at 04:32 PM
unclemikey
Online
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #9 · p.2 #9 · What is your best hiking tripod?


<I used a canon 5d2 and a 17-40 on it and the mirror slap would send vibrations down all the legs. It was impossible to use with the 135/2>

Killersnowman, I've been giving this statement some thought. I'm wondering where you would expect the vibration to go if it doesn't travel down the legs of the tripod. Just trying to learn from your experience. I would think with either of these two pieces of glass under normal shooting conditions you would be able to utilize a shutter speed greater than the focal length of the lens, somewhere from 100-250th sec which should be fast enough for either a 17-40 or 135 even big glass to get sharp pictures. If you indeed are using a long shutter exposure for certain shots, why aren't you locking up the mirror and adding a shutter release, wired or wireless to reduce camera shake? Just exploring for better technique.



Oct 07, 2013 at 06:16 PM
killersnowman
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #10 · p.2 #10 · What is your best hiking tripod?


unclemikey wrote:
<I used a canon 5d2 and a 17-40 on it and the mirror slap would send vibrations down all the legs. It was impossible to use with the 135/2>

Killersnowman, I've been giving this statement some thought. I'm wondering where you would expect the vibration to go if it doesn't travel down the legs of the tripod. Just trying to learn from your experience. I would think with either of these two pieces of glass under normal shooting conditions you would be able to utilize a shutter speed greater than the focal length of the lens, somewhere from 100-250th sec which
...Show more

im not going to compare the sirui to what i replaced it with, because i obviously needed more tripod than i thought. my point was that the load limits were very deceiving when i bought it. i thought that if it could hold 26lbs then i would be far and away stable. i was wrong.

of course the mirror slap was just an example. try shooting in some wind or even on some mushy or unstable ground. if the mirror makes the tripod vibrate then image what some wind would do. of course i over came the issues and still made images but it was frustrating and time consuming.

im sure the larger diameter sirui legs perform a bit better but im still not a fan. the ball heads are still pretty darn bad.

im just putting my 2 cents out there so that someone doesnt make the same mistake as me.



Oct 08, 2013 at 05:12 AM
1      
2
       end




FM Forums | General Gear-talk | Join Upload & Sell

1      
2
       end
    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Retrive password