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Archive 2013 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?
  
 
jbouchard
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


I expect this question has been asked before, but I've not found a thread on it.

Most of our cameras take pictures in a 3:2 proportion, 35mm film frames are 24x36, and my Nikon DSLR's are the same. Simple math 3:2 = 1.5:1 ratio. Except for the small 4x6" print that's not a common picture frame ratio. The standard options are 5x7 (1.4:1), 8x10 (1.25:1), etc. which means I've got to crop my 3:2 image. If I did a good job of filling the frame in the viewfinder, sometimes it's hard to decide "what can I give up in cropping?"

I'm a hobbyist, not a pro selling custom prints for big money. If I get a decent shot and want to give a print to a family member I tell my wife "next time you are at Walmart, pick me up a frame for this print"... I'm looking for a $5-10 frame, not a $100 custom frame. I've got a typical home inkjet printer with 8.5x11 paper, and it could print something like 7x10.5" in the 3:2 ratio, but there is no frame readily available that I know of, unless I use 8.5x11 document frame and an awkward matting job.

What does everyone do? Just shoot with plenty of space in the frame so you can crop 8x10 later? That's what I've done in the past, but lately I've been trying to do a better job of framing in the viewfinder and it's leaving me stuck. Getting a D3 with a 4x5 mode seems like an expensive option.



Sep 08, 2013 at 01:27 PM
sjms
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


shoot to crop


Sep 08, 2013 at 02:18 PM
ben egbert
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


Yes its a mess, the frame industry and to some extent the inkjet paper industry is stuck in the Brownie camera days.

I buy custom frames from Frames by Mail, and other places in 3:2 aspect ratio.

You could crop, but you end up with a lousy squarish aspect which I dislike other than for the occasional vertical print. I prefer 16x9 and have several frames at that aspect ratio.



Sep 08, 2013 at 02:28 PM
chez
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


Just get a bigger frame and matt the photo within the frame to whatever dimensions you want.


Sep 08, 2013 at 02:53 PM
Rod Gerst
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


Along with all the other suggestions here [all good] I might suggest you check availability of 8x12 frames. This size has come to be nearly standard anymore


Sep 08, 2013 at 03:33 PM
FLSTCSAM
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


This is so simple.........................

Look up Frame Destination. problem solved.

Sam



Sep 08, 2013 at 04:10 PM
Camperjim
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


I think the frame issue is relatively easy. One choice is to buy larger frames and mat to fit. The real problem is the available sizes for paper. 8 1/2 x 11 is a common size but for the correct aspect ratio we would need borderless at 8x12. For a print with a border, 9x13 paper would be ideal. For a larger print, there is a good paper choice 13x19 for 12x18 prints. For the next size jump, the standard paper is 17x22 and we really need 17x25 for 16x24 prints.

One poster suggested that we shoot to crop. I think that is an exceptionally bad idea which is done way too often. Personally I like to compose in camera and would have a tough time composing for a different aspect ratio. Of course there is the issue of which aspect ratio to shoot for later cropping. With the crazy paper sizes we need different aspect ratios for different sizes of paper.

Personally I have decided there is another option. Buy paper from manufacturers who provide suitable sizes. I will probably buy different papers from different manufacturers but I have started with Red River Paper. For almost all of their papers, Red River has 9x13, 13x19 and 17x25 papers.



Sep 09, 2013 at 03:29 AM
Lars Johnsson
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


Camperjim wrote:
I think the frame issue is relatively easy. One choice is to buy larger frames and mat to fit. The real problem is the available sizes for paper. 8 1/2 x 11 is a common size but for the correct aspect ratio we would need borderless at 8x12. For a print with a border, 9x13 paper would be ideal. For a larger print, there is a good paper choice 13x19 for 12x18 prints. For the next size jump, the standard paper is 17x22 and we really need 17x25 for 16x24 prints.

One poster suggested that we shoot to crop. I think
...Show more

+1



Sep 09, 2013 at 05:20 AM
Alan321
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


Camperjim wrote:
One poster suggested that we shoot to crop. I think that is an exceptionally bad idea which is done way too often.


I think that is an exceptionally harsh criticism because you make it seem like there will never be any justification for shooting loose and cropping later. Perhaps it is somewhat valid for landscape shooting but surely not for anything that might change format while you are looking at it - such as an animal that stands upright and no longer fits the horizontal format that you might have expected to use. Shooting loosely gives plenty of scope to concentrate on focus and so on with a view to extracting any number of suitable crops later on. It also potentially gives you more AF sensors to play with. By all means try getting what you want while you shoot but be aware that it catch you out.

- Alan



Sep 09, 2013 at 10:40 AM
 

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ben egbert
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


I have used Red River paper, for the last 3-4 years and indeed, they have great size selections. But I was having issues with paper wrinkling. I changed recently to Hahnemuelle which is available in 24x36 and can be cut to 17x24 or 17x29 which are my two most used sizes.

The 17x29 wastes some paper but is much easier to handle than cutting from a roll and attempting to flatten for my non roll feed Epson 3800.

I think Moab also has paper this size. 24x36 is a more common size I think. You could of course cut to smaller sizes.

Alan is correct of course, the wide aspect ratio is mostly a landscapers problem.



Sep 09, 2013 at 02:23 PM
hugowolf
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


The problem is twofold. In the US, the adoption of US office paper sizes for inkjet coated paper, and the ready-to-use framing industry’s Ludite insistence of using older film and glass plate aspect ratios. (There aren’t that many 8 x 10 inch glass plate compact point and shoot digital cameras around.)

At least in Europe, the A sized papers are a better approximation of a 3:2 ratio. In the US, 13 x 19 inch sheets do well for 12 x 18 inch prints, with enough border for framing. But 13 x 19 inch sheets are very often the most expensive cut of paper.

If you can find the paper you want in 24 x 36 inches, then cutting down is the way to go. US Arch D (24 x 36) is often less expensive per unit area than even roll paper – certainly the case for the two most used smooth cotton rags: Canson Rag Photographique 310 and Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308.

FrameDestination.com only charges an extra $2.50 single fee for custom frame sizes. $2.50 for one, or $2.50 for a 100.

Brian A



Sep 10, 2013 at 03:17 AM
Camperjim
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p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


Alan321 wrote:
I think that is an exceptionally harsh criticism because you make it seem like there will never be any justification for shooting loose and cropping later. Perhaps it is somewhat valid for landscape shooting but surely not for anything that might change format while you are looking at it - such as an animal that stands upright and no longer fits the horizontal format that you might have expected to use. Shooting loosely gives plenty of scope to concentrate on focus and so on with a view to extracting any number of suitable crops later on. It also potentially
...Show more
I really dislike the idea that we should be forced into cropping because the sizes of paper do not match the aspect ratio of our cameras. I do shoot "loose" but only by 5% which is the error in my viewfinder. That is enough to do minor straightening and exact crop adjustment. I try to shoot "tight" for several reasons. First as a matter of pride of workmanship. Next to preserve the maximum resolution afforded by my sensor. Finally because I pay a great deal of attention to composition. On some occasions I do plan to crop later but that is rare. Usually I see my composition in the viewfinder before I hit the shutter. Certainly there are some exceptions. Shooting loose can be a necessity when shooting moving sports or moving animals or objects. The idea that we should be forced to crop because of paper sizes is unacceptable to me.



Sep 10, 2013 at 04:39 AM
jbouchard
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p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


Thanks to everyone for their great ideas.

I'm going to try some "legal size" photo paper 8.5x14 which should work in my existing printer, and print 8x12. I'll try to find a local source for low cost 8x12 frames, or if I can't, I'll buy a them a few at a time from some internet source.

If that doesn't work I'll make myself a couple of jigs and start making 7x10.5" frames.



Sep 10, 2013 at 10:24 AM
nodal
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p.1 #14 · p.1 #14 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


SmokinJoe wrote:
... I'll make myself a couple of jigs and start making 7x10.5" frames.


Yes! Once you arrive here, you can make any ratio you want out of just about any material you want.



Sep 10, 2013 at 12:19 PM
Bifurcator
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p.1 #15 · p.1 #15 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


Who buys picture frames, seriously...?

Oh wait... I do. But where I live there's any (every!) size you can think of in 6 or 8 different materials each in 4 or 5 different colors and with lots of style variation all for between $1 and $15 for A3 and under.

But if where you live doesn't have that then just skip the purchase thing all together and go DIY:

http://www.curbly.com/users/matt-allison/posts/14932-roundup-10-inexpensive-diy-art-amp-picture-frame-ideas
http://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Custom-Picture-Frames/
Or spend four or five hundred on a new garage hobby: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lo52hj3gLGY
And you can do the same with hand tools and preformed molding material for pretty cheap.
etc. etc. etc. http://www.diynetwork.com/topics/picture-frames/index.html




Sep 10, 2013 at 02:31 PM
msalvetti
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p.1 #16 · p.1 #16 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


SmokinJoe wrote:
Thanks to everyone for their great ideas.

I'm going to try some "legal size" photo paper 8.5x14 which should work in my existing printer, and print 8x12. I'll try to find a local source for low cost 8x12 frames, or if I can't, I'll buy a them a few at a time from some internet source.

If that doesn't work I'll make myself a couple of jigs and start making 7x10.5" frames.


There's a Michael's in Biddeford - they have lots of low-cost frames, including 8x12.

Mark



Sep 14, 2013 at 03:02 AM
Imagemaster
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p.1 #17 · p.1 #17 · Picture Frames with 3:2 ratio? like 7 x 10.5"?


You shoot digital images, so why not try creating digital mats and frames? That way, you do not have to even buy mats or frames as you can make digital ones to suit your image. The first time I saw prints done this way, from a short distance, I could not believe they were digital mats and frames.

Then have your laminated print flush-mounted on foam core. This will work out both lighter and cheaper than having a print matted, glassed, and framed.

Scroll down to the samples which are a lot better than mine.

http://www.shutterfreaks.com/Actions/ACsBigFrames.html






















Sep 15, 2013 at 03:26 AM





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