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Archive 2013 · How do you mount your prints?
  
 
Bernie
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p.2 #1 · p.2 #1 · How do you mount your prints?


ben egbert wrote:
This is the sort of answer I was looking for, do you use a roller to apply pressure? What do you use to protect the image as you apply the pressure? Where do you get the gatorboard? Hmm, I get mats at Blick, bet they have it.


It comes with a spatula type tool to apply pressure as well as a slippery protective sheet for protecting the print. I start with a roller to get out air bubbles and to tack it into place.

I used to buy gatorboard from Blick. It's cheaper to buy 5 from Uline.



Aug 06, 2013 at 02:08 PM
ben egbert
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p.2 #2 · p.2 #2 · How do you mount your prints?


Bernie wrote:
It comes with a spatula type tool to apply pressure as well as a slippery protective sheet for protecting the print. I start with a roller to get out air bubbles and to tack it into place.

I used to buy gatorboard from Blick. It's cheaper to buy 5 from Uline.


Thanks, much appreciated. This is probably the first method I will attempt. I found some used dry mount presses, but I think the real issues is to get the mat boards attached to the backboard. With Hahn paper, I am not having an issue with the print, just the mat. I hate the reflections from glass, even the most expensive museum glass.



Aug 06, 2013 at 04:16 PM
capt don
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p.2 #3 · p.2 #3 · How do you mount your prints?


Ben, I hang my prints in art shows and banks and the only thing that I have found to give me a long term nice flat print is dry mount. I picked up a used on on ebay. Get an old Seal dry mount press, they last forever, have almost nothing to go bad and when you get tired of it there is always someone waiting in the wings to pick it up. I dry mount to acid free foam core.


Aug 06, 2013 at 04:21 PM
ben egbert
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p.2 #4 · p.2 #4 · How do you mount your prints?


capt don wrote:
Ben, I hang my prints in art shows and banks and the only thing that I have found to give me a long term nice flat print is dry mount. I picked up a used on on ebay. Get an old Seal dry mount press, they last forever, have almost nothing to go bad and when you get tired of it there is always someone waiting in the wings to pick it up. I dry mount to acid free foam core.


Thanks Dan, I have found many used for sale, I will watch for this brand. I should have noted that I only print for my own walls and seldom have any one image up for more than 5 years. I have to rotate them because of limited wall space.

Because of that I like to reuse mats and frames. The frames are easy of course but if I start fastening down the mats, I end up making more mats and sometimes the backing. The images I am not worried about. I either give them away or store them. I can always reprint. Since my post processing and print skills tend to get better over time, reprinting is not a bad thing. But I seldom want to, because over time my pictures get a bit better as well.

I used to do more permanent mat and mount for camera club competition so I have some experience with that. But they had a size limit that was way too small and I ended up with a lot of prints that I had no use for after showing.



Aug 06, 2013 at 06:24 PM
ben egbert
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p.2 #5 · p.2 #5 · How do you mount your prints?


Thanks everyone for the great tips. I have to decide how much to invest in any given image. If I mount the assembly (backing, image and mats) in a permanent fashion, I will end up with up to 100 of them over time and no place to display more than 8 at a time.

I could set up a secondary unframed display in my basement and may do that, but I am the only one who every visits the basement.

An easy fix would be to simply fasten down the mats, but that tends to make it hard to reuse stuff anyway. I might be happier with the best possible flatness.




Aug 07, 2013 at 02:40 PM
wsheldon
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p.2 #6 · p.2 #6 · How do you mount your prints?


ben egbert wrote:
Thanks Scott, some I knew, others I did not.


+1

Great resource. I started using the T-hinge method with Lineco Self Adhesive Hinging Tissue last year after finding that link, and it's been working great on my 13x19 prints matted in 18x24 frames. Paper and mat board are still perfectly flat after hanging at home and in a gallery for the past year. Much faster than adhesive or dry mounting, too.



Aug 07, 2013 at 02:58 PM
ben egbert
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p.2 #7 · p.2 #7 · How do you mount your prints?


wsheldon wrote:
+1

Great resource. I started using the T-hinge method with Lineco Self Adhesive Hinging Tissue last year after finding that link, and it's been working great on my 13x19 prints matted in 18x24 frames. Paper and mat board are still perfectly flat after hanging at home and in a gallery for the past year. Much faster than adhesive or dry mounting, too.


This is what I do now, and it works pretty good for the image if it does not start with wrinkles, but does nothing to hold the mat down. Note, I am printing two sizes, 16x24 and 16x29. Thats the printed size, mats and frame are larger. Mats for example are 22x28.



Aug 07, 2013 at 03:02 PM
ben egbert
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p.2 #8 · p.2 #8 · How do you mount your prints?


Scotch adhesive rolls questions.

1. Does it have a release liner that you remove after attaching it to the foam core?

2. Would you recommend using 11 inch wide in two strips for a 22 inch wide mat? The 11"x50' product is much cheaper than the 24"x50".

4. What sort of paper do you use to protect the image while applying pressure?

5. Do you use a roller?




Aug 08, 2013 at 05:33 PM
SSISteve
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p.2 #9 · p.2 #9 · How do you mount your prints?


I have tried all kinds of methods, including dry mounting,and I now use the archival corners. With dry mounting the matt boards can warp and I just wasn't perfectly happy with it. I have lots of prints hanging at home that came from the Ansel Adams gallery and they were dry mounted and many of them are warping. With the archival corners I can stick the corners and the images on the back of the cut matt board. I have around 30 images hanging in my office and the nice thing about this method is I can open the frame, pop the print out, and just insert another image and put the frame back together. I works great and the images have stayed flat without any warping. The paper I use is Epson Exhibition Fiber which is a heavier paper.

Steve



Aug 09, 2013 at 04:25 AM
JakeD
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p.2 #10 · p.2 #10 · How do you mount your prints?


Ben Egbert, sorry for the belated reply. I keep a few things in mind. First use a heavy paper, something like a 325 g/m2. Exhibition Fibre is that, but there are of course others. Sheet paper is generally better than roll, but roll paper can be flattened with a 'de-roller'. That works for me on roll paper. Hinge mount it at the top onto a sturdy backing, not the window mat. Inert drop corners on the bottom, with room for the work to drop if the frame is ever dropped by accident. The hinges should then tear, not the artwork. Edge strips are made either from mulberry paper and stuck down with natural ph Pure Rice Starch. (Prepare it correctly), or from mylar with an adhesive strip pre-attached. Lineco make and supply them. The main objective should be to mount and frame your work in a way in which it can be reduced to its original state by de-construction of the matting and framing. There is no adhesive in existence that doesn't do damage to the substrate. Some are slower to cause the damage, but they all get there in the end. With glass on the mat, there should be no problem with the mat not lying flat. 8 ply matting is even better than 4 ply, of course. Many art galleries mount their artwork using edge strips. That's purely non-invasive and completely reversible.


Aug 09, 2013 at 08:40 PM
 

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wsheldon
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p.2 #11 · p.2 #11 · How do you mount your prints?


ben egbert wrote:
This is what I do now, and it works pretty good for the image if it does not start with wrinkles, but does nothing to hold the mat down. Note, I am printing two sizes, 16x24 and 16x29. Thats the printed size, mats and frame are larger. Mats for example are 22x28.


Interesting. Do you hinge the mat to the backing? The mat is sandwiched pretty tightly when I mount this way and I haven't had any issues with mat movement or flexing.



Aug 09, 2013 at 09:47 PM
ben egbert
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p.2 #12 · p.2 #12 · How do you mount your prints?


wsheldon wrote:
Interesting. Do you hinge the mat to the backing? The mat is sandwiched pretty tightly when I mount this way and I haven't had any issues with mat movement or flexing.


The mats tend to bow away from the image. They are tight where the frame-mat-image-backing is joined, but not so much at the inner edges and you can see gaps between the image and the mat. I don't use glass because of reflections. When I used to use plex, it helds the mats down, but I never found any glass that did not reflect.





Aug 09, 2013 at 09:53 PM
hugowolf
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p.2 #13 · p.2 #13 · How do you mount your prints?


ben egbert wrote:
The mats tend to bow away from the image. They are tight where the frame-mat-image-backing is joined, but not so much at the inner edges and you can see gaps between the image and the mat...

Tight is not what you want if you are framing unglazed. TIght at the frame edges will force a gap at the mat window side. What you want is the mat hanging from the hinge at the top of the backing board.

An alternative to matting would be linen liners. They are made of wood, and only some of them are covered in linen. They are a little too decorative for me, but they may suit you.

Brian A



Aug 10, 2013 at 08:55 PM
ben egbert
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p.2 #14 · p.2 #14 · How do you mount your prints?


hugowolf wrote:
Tight is not what you want if you are framing unglazed. TIght at the frame edges will force a gap at the mat window side. What you want is the mat hanging from the hinge at the top of the backing board.

An alternative to matting would be linen liners. They are made of wood, and only some of them are covered in linen. They are a little too decorative for me, but they may suit you.

Brian A


Mine are not that tight. Here is what I was planning to do next. I will hinge mount the image to the foam core rather than the mat. Then I will tape the mat to the foam core near the boundary between the image and mat cutout. They tend to have gaps near the middle so I can just use a short strip of double sided tape at each edge.

The matted image will be a dedicated job with only the frame being re-usable.

Since starting this series of questions, I have switched to Hahnemuhle 308 in 24x36 sheets. This required a Carl cutter which has its own learning curve and I nearly ruined my first cut. Its working good now.

I have decided I can live with 3 different aspect ratio frames, 16x9, 3x2 and 4x5. I ordered a 3rd 16x9 frame.

I also ordered some Premier Art Print Shield Spray. Still waiting for the spray so I have not mounted anything yet.

I have decided I don't need to dry mount, but simply need a way to reduce gaps between the mat and image.

I am really happy with the Hahnemuhle prints. My Red River prints were always too dark and needed a special profile. The Hahnemuhle are perfect with the standard profile. No sign of wrinkles and I like the heavier paper. I think the images have more contrast but that may be wishful thinking.




Aug 10, 2013 at 09:30 PM
biedron1
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p.2 #15 · p.2 #15 · How do you mount your prints?


I posted this a few years ago about gatorboard mounting:

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/971206/0?keyword=x#9203880

The only thing I do different now is that I get my gatorboard from FoamBoardSource.com:

http://www.foamboardsource.com/gatorfoams.html

They have very good quality control (of the cut edges and packaging), and getting boards cut to a custom size is not that much more expensive than standard sizes, should you want that.

I have a ~5Mb pdf file that illustrates much of the process, (minus the tedious sanding step!); PM me if you'd like a copy.

Bob



Aug 10, 2013 at 09:39 PM
ben egbert
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p.2 #16 · p.2 #16 · How do you mount your prints?


biedron1 wrote:
I posted this a few years ago about gatorboard mounting:

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/971206/0?keyword=x#9203880

The only thing I do different now is that I get my gatorboard from FoamBoardSource.com:

http://www.foamboardsource.com/gatorfoams.html

They have very good quality control (of the cut edges and packaging), and getting boards cut to a custom size is not that much more expensive than standard sizes, should you want that.

I have a ~5Mb pdf file that illustrates much of the process, (minus the tedious sanding step!); PM me if you'd like a copy.

Bob



This looks good for non traditional (frame and mat) work). As I have deduced, the real issue is mat lifting. The rest seems to be working fine. I either need to bond the mat to the backing, or float it as suggested above. I will of course try both methods as each is easy to do.



Aug 10, 2013 at 10:02 PM
hugowolf
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p.2 #17 · p.2 #17 · How do you mount your prints?


ben egbert wrote:
I will hinge mount the image to the foam core rather than the mat.


If you have been taping the print to the mat rather than the backing board, then that will definately cause bowing of the mat.

ben egbert wrote:
Then I will tape the mat to the foam core near the boundary between the image and mat cutout.


This isn't a good idea, you need as little connection between the two as possible. Everything should be hanging from the stiffest material: the form board or backing board. The print should be T mounted to it, the mat should be hinged to it.

Brian A



Aug 11, 2013 at 01:47 AM
ben egbert
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p.2 #18 · p.2 #18 · How do you mount your prints?


Never considered that, I always hang the image from the mat and free float the foam core. I will start with your idea, I assume you mean hinge the image and the mat to the backboard (foam core).

But in this case, why even hang the mat? It can't go anywhere, it is fully captured by the frame. Of course not tight, the frame is about 1/8 larger than the mat (outside edges).

My foamboard clamps can be adjusted for minimum pressure as well, but I really don't want visible gaps between the mat and frame either. That would just replace one problem with another.




Aug 11, 2013 at 02:55 AM
Ho1972
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p.2 #19 · p.2 #19 · How do you mount your prints?


Tagged for reference.


Aug 11, 2013 at 10:04 AM
hugowolf
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p.2 #20 · p.2 #20 · How do you mount your prints?


Taping the print to the mat (erroneously called hinging because hinging tap is often used) is easier, and there is less chance of the image becoming decentered. But the print then exerts a force which isn’t evenly distributed across the width of the mat. This is fine when you have glass supporting the mat face, but without glass the uneven weight distribution is a major cause of mat deformation. (The method labeled ‘Picture mounting – hinging photograph to mat’ in the link below.)

Taping the print to the mounting board, and hinging (and it is hinging this time) the mat to the board, is much better for weight distribution when you are not glazing. The mat is then essentially hanging, supported evenly across the top – you have both tensional and torsional support. (The method labeled ‘Picture mounting – hinging mat to mount board’ in the link below.)
http://www.framedestination.com/picture_frame_mounting.html

Museum level framers would scoff at the use of self-adhesive hinging tape for mounting the print to the board. The tape is acid free and for all intent and purposes archival, but the method isn’t because it isn’t easily removed. Moisture activated (gummed) tape is seen as better, P90 mounting tape would be even better, and truly museum quality would be mulberry paper strips (torn, not cut) and rice starch paste: http://www.framingsupplies.com/ToolsTapesGlues/ToolsTapesGlues.htm

I use Lineco self-adhesive hinging tape for both hinging and mounting.

A good post on the whole process:
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/37107364

You are right, it does have to be tight, but not too tight.

Brian A



Aug 11, 2013 at 03:25 PM
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