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thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)
  
 
sjms
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p.1 #1 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


here I thought thunderbolt had legs. oh well. even with thunderbolt 2 coming.

http://www.neowin.net/news/acer-dumps-thunderbolt-ports-from-new-pcs-in-favor-of-usb-30



Jul 15, 2013 at 06:45 PM
Ian.Dobinson
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p.1 #2 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


Considered getting a thunderbolt drive for my Imac . then I saw the price above USB 3 variants of the same drive . I just cant see the benefit (to me) . USB3 is fast enough for my needs

however if TB drives were a more sensible cost then of course I would consider a couple and love the speed



Jul 15, 2013 at 07:52 PM
EB-1
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p.1 #3 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


The USB 3.1 spec was finalized. It is twice as fast as 3.0. SuperSpeed USB 10 Gbps Ready for Development

EBH



Aug 01, 2013 at 01:15 AM
sjms
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p.1 #4 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


yes that was due and in the pipeline awhile back


Aug 01, 2013 at 03:39 PM
rodmcwha
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p.1 #5 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


Really doesn't matter how fast the connection is, if it is faster than the drive, itself! A 7200 rpm drive can only generate data at so high a speed.



Aug 01, 2013 at 03:41 PM
BenV
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p.1 #6 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


rodmcwha wrote:
Really doesn't matter how fast the connection is, if it is faster than the drive, itself! A 7200 rpm drive can only generate data at so high a speed.


Mechanical drives are slowly becoming obsolete. Solid state is the future.



Aug 01, 2013 at 04:22 PM
Gochugogi
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p.1 #7 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


BenV wrote:
Mechanical drives are slowly becoming obsolete. Solid state is the future.


At $1000 per GB of SSD, that future is still far away for audio, video and photo storage. The future is already here here for consumer use.



Aug 01, 2013 at 05:24 PM
Ian.Dobinson
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p.1 #8 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


Gochugogi wrote:
At $1000 per GB of SSD, that future is still far away for audio, video and photo storage. The future is already here here for consumer use.



Im presuming you mean TB ?.



Aug 01, 2013 at 06:27 PM
Gochugogi
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p.1 #9 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


Ian.Dobinson wrote:
Im presuming you mean TB ?.


yep!



Aug 01, 2013 at 07:42 PM
EB-1
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p.1 #10 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


BenV wrote:
Mechanical drives are slowly becoming obsolete. Solid state is the future.


Fours years ago everyone was predicting that SSDs would grow dramatically and practically replace magnetic drives in short order. Now you will find that the predicted growth rate charts are far less optimistic. SSDs have plenty of limitations, namely that at smaller process sizes the write cycles are decreasing to a level that is unacceptable for many purposes. The process sizes are not shrinking that fast either and we are increasingly seeing fractional nodes. Meanwhile HAMR and BPM are on the way to increase HDD capacity and lower costs as well.

EBH



Aug 02, 2013 at 01:01 AM
 

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justruss
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p.1 #11 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


I think we have Intel to blame for the slow adoption of Thunderbolt.

It's not going to die, but it is languishing as a for-the-masses interconnect. Which is sad, because it is SO much faster/more useful than even the newly announced USB 3.1. The key is low-overhead, daisy-chaining, and actual real throughput that matches maximum specs/burst throughput. Same as USB/USB 2 vs. Firewire in a lot of ways... which hasn't ended that well for Firewire as a for-the-masses interconnect.

But Thunderbolt and Firewire are different. And Thunderbolt can carry a variety of signals, including the various USB flavors.

But $30-50 cables, restricted licensing, and subsequent massive delays on promised innovated products is really dampening support for Thunderbolt-- which is really a fantastic technology. We may see some reversal with the release of the new Mac Pro-- which kind of depends on TB for a lot of things-- but hopefully it won't be too late. Remember, until the NEW Mac Pro ships, Apple still has yet to ship a Mac Pro with TB support. Kinda nutty.



Aug 02, 2013 at 06:45 AM
lsquare
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p.1 #12 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


BenV wrote:
Mechanical drives are slowly becoming obsolete. Solid state is the future.


That's non-sense. Mechanical drives will continue to exist due to its low per GB price.



Aug 02, 2013 at 06:49 AM
lsquare
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p.1 #13 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


EB-1 wrote:
The USB 3.1 spec was finalized. It is twice as fast as 3.0. SuperSpeed USB 10 Gbps Ready for Development

EBH


USB have the advantage of a larger install base and having none of the restrictions that Intel/Apple have applied to TB. It's sort of sad to see that TB isn't really gaining any traction despite having superior specs.



Aug 02, 2013 at 06:51 AM
EB-1
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p.1 #14 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


It's not really sad. TB isn't solving enough of a problem to be needed much, especially on the PC side. I suppose it is fine for Macs, but they have often had various bizarre constraints. One still needs USB 2/3 for numerous peripherals.

EBH



Aug 02, 2013 at 11:50 AM
sjms
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p.1 #15 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


I was all in for TB, but it seems like FW in a consumer environment it has fallen well short due to its restrictive pricing structure and slim pickings in product.


Aug 02, 2013 at 12:33 PM
BenV
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p.1 #16 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


EB-1 wrote:
Fours years ago everyone was predicting that SSDs would grow dramatically and practically replace magnetic drives in short order. Now you will find that the predicted growth rate charts are far less optimistic. SSDs have plenty of limitations, namely that at smaller process sizes the write cycles are decreasing to a level that is unacceptable for many purposes. The process sizes are not shrinking that fast either and we are increasingly seeing fractional nodes. Meanwhile HAMR and BPM are on the way to increase HDD capacity and lower costs as well.

EBH


You must be mistaken, the small write processes were a limit of the early SSD's, and that was with the controller. The only limitation anymore is price vs. mechanical drives,which is pretty rapidly closing the gap. Size's will always be shrinking due to the nature of electronics, while mechanical drives will not. As we move forward in technology, all types of files increase in size, it's only a matter of time when mechanical drives cannot keep up with reading/writing at acceptable levels.



Aug 02, 2013 at 01:04 PM
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p.1 #17 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


TB is a complete waste.


Aug 02, 2013 at 01:39 PM
sjms
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p.1 #18 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


not exactly it has a few redeeming qualities.
TB2 is just around the corner just shy of USB3+

we must buy. we are consumers. must.... obey.... marketeers.



Aug 02, 2013 at 03:37 PM
15Bit
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p.1 #19 · thunderbolt losing ground (if but a little)


Thunderbolt, though great, is solving problems that most folk just don't have: USB3 is more than fast enough for most users' external storage needs, and it's cheap (hell, USB2 was good enough for most). For external arrays there is e-SATA, which is arguably better in many ways as whilst it might not offer the headline bandwidth it does offer the full SATA communication standard - command queuing, low latency etc. Similarly, everyone is happy with their existing monitor connections, be they DVI, Display Port or HDMI. And there is little evidence in history that folk are going to flock to buy external graphics processors.

A great technology i'm sure, but with little mass-market appeal cos it costs a lot more than it's immediate competitors and offers little extra that people really want.



Aug 04, 2013 at 08:09 AM





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