Home · Register · Search · View Winners · Software · Hosting · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Canon Forum | Join Upload & Sell

1
       2       end
  

Archive 2013 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!
  
 
StillFingerz
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #1 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


A Canon shooter gets a bit too close to his subject, good thing his gear got in the way...

http://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2013/06/26/deer-attacks-photographer-video



Jun 26, 2013 at 10:36 PM
jeffdjohnston
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #2 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


And that's why I get harassed regularly by park personnel in the states when I'm 50-75 yards away with a 500mm +1.4X


Jun 26, 2013 at 10:59 PM
Mescalamba
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #3 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


Well, good thing it wasnt hungry bear..


Jun 26, 2013 at 11:06 PM
snapsy
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #4 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


I'm ready for my closeup Mr Demille.


Jun 26, 2013 at 11:12 PM
big country
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #5 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


was that lens a tamron 16-28?


Jun 26, 2013 at 11:13 PM
Jeffrey
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #6 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


"30 years of vegetarian just came to a finish". What if he was hit with a stalk of broccoli?


Jun 26, 2013 at 11:22 PM
time2clmb
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #7 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


What a moron. He deserved it for being such a clueless fool.


Jun 26, 2013 at 11:34 PM
Pixel Perfect
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #8 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


StillFingerz wrote:
A Canon shooter gets a bit too close to his subject, good thing his gear got in the way...

http://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2013/06/26/deer-attacks-photographer-video


The lens looks like a Nikon 14-24 to me. This was on TV two weeks ago.



Jun 26, 2013 at 11:34 PM
Bones74
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #9 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


I often shoot in Richmond Park, London which has dozens of large wild Red Deer stags (Many sets on my flickr). The only time it's dangerous to get close is during the rut or if they're fighting each other. I've often seen people standing 2 yards away from a stag shooting it with a cell phone or a compact. The stag either ignores them or just walks away. I try not to get within 10 yards of the stags but sometimes they walk close by and then I just stand still or move slowly away to give them space.

Based on my experience I can understand why he thought it was ok to get out and get close, but it wasn't the best move. Stags in some areas of the UK are obviously safer to get close to than others.



Jun 27, 2013 at 02:44 PM
Access
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #10 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


Bones b'cos if the animals live in the vicinity of people or see people often, than they become accustomed to them. Versus wild animals that may have never seen a person before, or that have been threatened by people in the past (ie. hunters). If it's a popular park where people are often interacting with them, they might have lost all their natural fears.


Jun 27, 2013 at 03:04 PM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



pKai
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #11 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


As a much younger and foolish photographer I found myself needing some frame-filling images of wild bison. Armed with my longest lens of 200mm and more balls than brains, I decided it was a good idea to solve this dilemma by waltzing into the middle of a herd of the beasties at Custer State Park in South Dakota....

At first, they completely ignored me, which emboldened me to go deeper into the herd. I guess I must have crossed some invisible line because after some minutes a large male took an interest in this biped that had invaded their space......

It was a bit heart-stopping to see a 2,000 pound unhappy animal 10 meters away staring you down and making not-so-funny snorting noises. I tried to slowly crawl away, but they were having none of that... it was obvious they wanted me to stay put. Luckily, they also weren't attacking. I managed to crawl a few meters to a boulder the size of a small car which I figured I could use for cover if they charged. My plan was to keep the boulder between me and them and hope they weren't smart enough to attack from multiple sides simultaneously. This sounds silly now, but at the time it made me feel better. As I sat there for the next hour or so, I acknowledged that my fate was in their hands either way and got over the anxiety by "owning" my bad decision.....

I shot all 10 or so rolls of Kodachrome I had with me and came away with some pretty awesome images... Worst case, I figured someone would sooner or later find the film next to the body and be able to figure out what happened. I felt relieved when eventually, they meandered away and I was able to finally change my underwear.

I consider myself lucky I am here to tell the story..... I have since invested in longer lenses and never let myself be surrounded by wild animals....

Edited on Jun 27, 2013 at 03:37 PM · View previous versions



Jun 27, 2013 at 03:16 PM
jeffdjohnston
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #12 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


I've heard too many stories where a wild or habituated animal "never did that before". Its always alright and everything's cool.... until it's not.


Jun 27, 2013 at 03:36 PM
Access
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #13 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


pKai or anyone else who finds themselves in a situation like that.
Generally, playing dead is the best option. Most animals, both predators or prey animals, respond to movement. If you are surrounded by a herd of aggressive animals, or even a single dangerous animal that you can't outrun (ie. a bear), dropping to the ground and staying perfectly still is the best strategy for survival. In most cases it/they will lose interest and eventually move on, after which you can get back up and walk away.



Jun 27, 2013 at 03:40 PM
Bones74
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #14 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


Access wrote:
Bones b'cos if the animals live in the vicinity of people or see people often, than they become accustomed to them. Versus wild animals that may have never seen a person before, or that have been threatened by people in the past (ie. hunters). If it's a popular park where people are often interacting with them, they might have lost all their natural fears.


Hence my last sentence: "Stags in some areas of the UK are obviously safer to get close to than others." Most wild places in UK have walkers and photographers most of the year round. Obviously the most dangerous animal you'd encounter is an aggressive or defensive Red Deer Stag, which are the UK 's largest wild land mammal. My point is that photographer may have had "safe" close interaction with stags in other areas which is why he thought this time would be no different. Time of year (mating season) is also important, as is that fact that maybe some Hinds were close by and out of shot. There are instances of stags going for people in Richmond Park, but as a rule, unless it's during the rut they're fairly mild.

Here is Fenton the dog in Richmond Park, which has spawned many funny spoof videos.



Jun 27, 2013 at 03:43 PM
Access
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #15 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


Well what's the worst is when people feed the animals. When animals start to see people as food sources then they'll actively follow them around and expect to be fed, and if you try to shoo them away or don't feed them it only encourages them. In some places I've been harassed by ducks, goats, etc. and the rangers say that people have feed them too much in the past so they learned to think of people as sources of food.


Jun 27, 2013 at 03:49 PM
Bones74
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #16 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


Bushey Park is just a few miles from Richmond Park. This poor fella must have got the fright of his life. This video shows how aggressive the stags in Richmond Park can be.

Last year I came across an old stag very worse for wear who had copped an antler tine to the eye area. It had got infected and was weeping puss. He was so weak we could walk right past him with little reaction. I emailed park staff with a photo and told them where I'd last seen the stag. I don't know if any action was taken.

The original video was shot in the Scottish Highlands where the deer are definitely a lot wilder.

Edited on Jun 27, 2013 at 04:06 PM · View previous versions



Jun 27, 2013 at 03:55 PM
DtEW
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #17 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


Pixel Perfect wrote:
The lens looks like a Nikon 14-24 to me.


I think you're right. I thought it also looked like a Tokina 16-28, but a search of his Wordpress blog shows no evidence of that particular Tokina, but plenty of reference to the Nikon 14-24.



Jun 27, 2013 at 06:26 PM
Gochugogi
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #18 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


Access wrote:
Well what's the worst is when people feed the animals. When animals start to see people as food sources then they'll actively follow them around and expect to be fed, and if you try to shoo them away or don't feed them it only encourages them. In some places I've been harassed by ducks, goats, etc. and the rangers say that people have feed them too much in the past so they learned to think of people as sources of food.


Deer are very adaptable and, when we destroy their habitat, they start living among us. I lived in a city where deer were everywhere, nobody fed them, and they boldly walked down main street, hung out in parking lots, raided trash, could jump any fence and strip your garden bare, etc. And, yeah, if you messed with them they would kick the crap out of you...



Jun 27, 2013 at 06:36 PM
Access
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #19 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


Gochugogi wrote:
Deer are very adaptable and, when we destroy their habitat, they start living among us. I lived in a city where deer were everywhere, nobody fed them, and they boldly walked down main street, hung out in

Where I live it is more often that the deer have destroyed their own habitat than anything that people would or even could do.



Jun 27, 2013 at 07:38 PM
pKai
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #20 · They're 'wild' animals, and horns are dangerous!


Access wrote:
Where I live it is more often that the deer have destroyed their own habitat than anything that people would or even could do.


Deer "destroy their own habitat" only after humans kill off all the predators that keep their numbers in check.

Deer evolved having their numbers kept in control by being eaten. Mother nature did not prepare them to control their own overpopulation... When this happens, they eat everything in sight, including our gardens and when that's all gone, they starve to death.

Due to the lack of animal predators and given the fact that in many places human hunters for one reason or another do not kill enough of them to make up for the lack of wolves, we have many nuisance deer in the US.



Jun 27, 2013 at 08:37 PM
1
       2       end




FM Forums | Canon Forum | Join Upload & Sell

1
       2       end
    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Retrive password