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Archive 2013 · lighting leather
  
 
khwaja
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · lighting leather


lighting leather is driving me crazy... each type of leather needs a different lighting setup.
All i've found after a morning of shooting is... nothing

And i'd rather not use a light tent. though i'vrealised i need one softbox from the top on a boom.

























Edit: totally forgot why i posted here...

I used a 24" square softbox on camera right, kept changing the angle just beside me i had white chartpaper (A2 size) in a V shape diffused by thin cloth. in some shots, i held a bare flash above the bag which gave a really nice look but had a dark patch where there was less light.
Then i thought of how metal is lit, so i laid white cloth near the bottom of the bag, outside the frame, this had an effect but it was a bit too dull.






So, black is a no go for shooting leather. white gives instant results but not the look i'm going for. tomorrow i plan on using metal foil to add more light.

can i see your bag shots please?



Jun 08, 2013 at 06:51 AM
Gregg Heckler
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · lighting leather


Try placing your softbox on a boom directly overhead and down and low as you can get it without it being in the frame. Then play with moving the box backward and forward to control the spill on the BG and the amount light on the subject. Then, use a white reflector or white card to bounce a little light from the bottom onto the subject. This reflector will probably cause a high light as well so play with it or you may not need it at all. You might also try using/holding a 30" or larger translucent reflector between the the softbox and subject to further diffuse the light and soften the specular highlights.

Also, try a few shots with Black cards or flags close to either side of the subject negative fill. You might also try a translucent plastic bottom and place a light under to shoot through it.



Jun 08, 2013 at 04:40 PM
khwaja
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · lighting leather


thanks...
i scoured the internet, it's almost like leather lighting is an industrial secret



Jun 08, 2013 at 06:11 PM
Micky Bill
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · lighting leather


For shiny leather you don't really light the leather but instead use a large white card and point the light at the card, often a spot light works well so you don;t just have an even tone across the board. Then place the card so it's reflected into the leather item.

So I have found a combination of the above, combined with direct or softbox light and black cards for negative fill to be a good technique.



Jun 08, 2013 at 06:24 PM
rico
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · lighting leather


Big fan of hard light speaking, but these pics could use some fill - otherwise, very nice. When shooting objects this size, I like to have a 3'x4' SB boomed over the table. That contributes most of the fill, and shiny surfaces are attractively rendered. I also avoid pure white or pure black b/g. Very dark can work but, with a dark subject, you really need rim lighting for most all edges.


Jun 09, 2013 at 07:56 AM
 

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cgardner
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · lighting leather


In concept shiny leather is like shooting a chrome ball or the metal parts of jewelry - curved surfaces which will reflect the light source when it it pointed directly a the object.

The solution to control the appearance of the specular reflections is to put the object in a small white room (e.g. a white tent) and aim the lights at the walls, not the object being photographed then "killing" the reflections selectively with "flags" to block the light where shadows would normally be seen in natural lighting (lower and opposite the direction of the "key" light.

To eliminate the specular highlights you'd want to use the same indirect lighting strategy but surround the object with black draping so the camera sees only the reflections of it not the light sources to the extent that's possible. Then instead of flags to block light and create the illusion of shadows white reflector cards are used to create shape defining accent highlights.

The two strategies are opposites. A white "tent" creates all highlights and flags create the illusion of shadows and 3D shape in the 2D photo. It's like an overcast day outdoors. With a black "tent" approach you start with the object in uniform shadow then selectively at reflectors (or direct sources) to create shape defining highlights. That approach is more like shooting on the shady side of a house outdoors.

As for background middle gray would provide the best visual separation for widest variety of purses.



Jun 09, 2013 at 12:30 PM
khwaja
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · lighting leather


is this better?








edit: forgive the post processing.



Jun 12, 2013 at 06:52 AM
khwaja
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · lighting leather


swallowed my ego and shot this on white... only color corrected, no retouching.







Edit: Stretched a white bedsheet at 45 degrees and in front of the leather (2 Yongnuo 560mk3 at half power), bag at 45 degrees to the camera.



Jun 15, 2013 at 09:03 AM
jasoncallen
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · lighting leather


Big, soft light is your friend here. Get the light as close as possible, and as wide of an area as possible. Light it the same way you would light a model's skin.


Jun 20, 2013 at 05:21 PM





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