Home · Register · Search · View Winners · Software · Hosting · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Nikon Forum | Join Upload & Sell

1
       2       end
  

Archive 2013 · "designed for digital" lens
  
 
beanpkk
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · "designed for digital" lens


I just visited my local camera shop, where they told me that oldish lenses like the Nikkor 35mm f/2.0D designed for film will not work as well on a digital camera as newer lenses designed for digital cameras. I think I know about the reflectivity problem, wherein a digital sensor reflects light back onto the lens which then can reflect the light back onto the sensor and affect the image. But I was told that light comes straight out the camera end of a digital lens but at an angle for a non-digital lens, and that this would affect image quality too.

Can someone shed a little light (no pun intended NOT!) on digital lenses vs. film lenses?

Thanks!
Keith



Jun 06, 2013 at 10:18 PM
davidnholtjr
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · "designed for digital" lens


beanpkk wrote:
I just visited my local camera shop, where they told me that oldish lenses like the Nikkor 35mm f/2.0D designed for film will not work as well on a digital camera as newer lenses designed for digital cameras. I think I know about the reflectivity problem, wherein a digital sensor reflects light back onto the lens which then can reflect the light back onto the sensor and affect the image. But I was told that light comes straight out the camera end of a digital lens but at an angle for a non-digital lens, and that this would affect image
...Show more


The 35mm f/2.0D works just fine on a digital camera. I had it and it's a great lens. It's all really about the coatings that the lenses have, but the old lenses work fine. I've never had any problems with them on digital.





Jun 06, 2013 at 10:36 PM
Zebrabot
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · "designed for digital" lens


It's just sales BS talk, unless you're buying view camera lenses for a digital back.


Jun 07, 2013 at 12:55 AM
jhinkey
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · "designed for digital" lens


Totally on a case-by-case basis. Lenses that sucked on film will suck on digital, but many older lenses shine on digital SLRs - you just have to know which ones will work well.

It's amazing what one can hear from a photo sales guy at times. Even at the local pro shop here in Seattle sometimes I overhear conversations between the sales folks (who are all photographers for the most part) and customers and I just want to reach out and strangle the sales people because of the mis-information that comes out.

- John



Jun 07, 2013 at 01:02 AM
pburke
Online
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · "designed for digital" lens


pure marketing talk. Anything these days is "digital" or "HD" or "cloud based" - whatever works to make people want to buy something new.

Most of my lenses are older than the first Nikon digital camera and work just fine.

light coming out at an angle? that's a new one






Jun 07, 2013 at 01:04 AM
beanpkk
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · "designed for digital" lens


Thanks all for the responses. You echo pretty much what I was thinking.

Keith



Jun 07, 2013 at 03:34 AM
Gregstx
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · "designed for digital" lens


When I got my first DSLR, I already had some really nice pro level "film" lenses. I was very disappointed to discover that those lenses that were so amazing with film were less sharp than some of the new consumer level "digital" lenses that I got with my DSLR. I was told that "digital" lenses were better on digital cameras. My second DSLR did not look that terrific with the "film" lenses either. However, when I got my D7000, suddenly those old "film" lenses got to the level of pretty darned amazing again.


Jun 07, 2013 at 03:45 AM
Dustin Gent
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · "designed for digital" lens


Don't buy from that shop


Jun 07, 2013 at 06:43 AM
Stdon
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · "designed for digital" lens


All my lenses are older including going back 40 years they've all worked a treat on a D50, D1X, D700, D7000 and D800. I also mount the D800 piggyback on a Busch Pressman Model D and use it with 60-70 year old lenses and bellows. I never bought into the digital or DX lens hype. Bad lenses are bad lenses good lenses are good lenses no matter what you hang them on.


Jun 07, 2013 at 08:23 AM
Slug69
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · "designed for digital" lens


The biggest change was when the D90, D3, D300's came out the JPEGs had the purple fringing mapped out giving a new lease on life of many older lenses.


Jun 07, 2013 at 08:39 AM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



Makten
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · "designed for digital" lens


beanpkk wrote:
I just visited my local camera shop, where they told me that oldish lenses like the Nikkor 35mm f/2.0D designed for film will not work as well on a digital camera as newer lenses designed for digital cameras. I think I know about the reflectivity problem, wherein a digital sensor reflects light back onto the lens which then can reflect the light back onto the sensor and affect the image. But I was told that light comes straight out the camera end of a digital lens but at an angle for a non-digital lens, and that this would affect image
...Show more

It's true if you are a DX shooter. DX lenses have a smaller image circle and thus often give higher resolution per sensor area than FX lenses (this has of course nothing with film or digital to do).
The thing with the angle of light is also true, but doesn't matter very much on SLR cameras where the exit pupil always is at least as far from the sensor as the mount.

If you have a bunch of lenses you can try to stop them down and look at the aperture from the rear. You will notice that the distance from the mount to the aperture is not the same for all lenses. Nothing to worry about on a Nikon SLR though, but a major problem for mirrorless cameras with some lenses (Leica M wides).



Jun 07, 2013 at 11:54 AM
Osai
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · "designed for digital" lens


beanpkk wrote:
But I was told that light comes straight out the camera end of a digital lens but at an angle for a non-digital lens, and that this would affect image quality too.

Thanks!
Keith



What?? What a load of crap. Do NOT do business with this guy.



Jun 07, 2013 at 02:14 PM
beanpkk
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · "designed for digital" lens


Thanks for the info. Just for fun I'll look at the aperture location for a couple of lenses, and I'll put the D lens I was considering back on the list.

k



Jun 07, 2013 at 08:40 PM
jbouchard
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #14 · p.1 #14 · "designed for digital" lens


pburke wrote:
pure marketing talk. Anything these days is "digital" or "HD" or "cloud based" - whatever works to make people want to buy something new.


Don't forget when Music CD's first came out, all the speakers were "CD Ready"

Realistically, if you have what was a cheap kit zoom from the 80's (or whenever kit zooms started to become popular), and put it on a 24mp DX body it will probably look like crap. The lens was OK for film and 4x6" prints, but it probably would have looked like crap if you tried to print 20x30", but the average hobbiest didn't print large prints, so most people were OK with the lens. Now it's easy to take a 24mp image through that lens and display 100% on your screen, and it looks like crap, because that's like printing that 20x30". The bar has been raised. Like other people have said "an old crappy lens is still crappy, and a old good lens is still good", and actually "an old crappy lens is really really crappy now" because the average person views a resolutions they didn't before.



Jun 07, 2013 at 08:41 PM
FredAz
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #15 · p.1 #15 · "designed for digital" lens


There is a hint of truth to this.
Image sensors have an angle known as the "CRA" or Chief Ray Angle" that is the maximum angle that light can cleanly enter the photo-site. Although a much greater issue in small imagers like cell-phones, it does apply to early, front-lit sensors. The outer edges of the image circle provide by some lenses is coming in at significant angle and might exceed some sensors' CRA.

Newer BSI imagers suffer less from the problem since the photo well is less deep.



Jun 08, 2013 at 01:02 AM
beanpkk
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #16 · p.1 #16 · "designed for digital" lens


SmokinJoe: I had forgotten about the "CD ready" speakers. :-)

FredAz: Interesting. So if light coming in exceeds the CRA, does it just vignette? Or does it alter the color content as well?

Thx,
Keith



Jun 08, 2013 at 12:30 PM
tobicus
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #17 · p.1 #17 · "designed for digital" lens


My 35/2 is glued to my D700 all day long when shooting weddings or personal stuff. This guy's trying to take you for a riiide.


Jun 08, 2013 at 01:04 PM
CGrindahl
Online
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #18 · p.1 #18 · "designed for digital" lens


For someone who shoots almost exclusively with Nikon manual focus lenses, many of which are forty years old and had to be converted so I could mount them on my D700, all I can do is laugh. The 35 f/2D that was part of my first kit of lenses after moving from Canon to Nikon is long gone but not because it didn't perform but because I enjoyed manual focusing and found the 35 f/2 O AI'd a better fit.

As noted, DX lenses are designed for a smaller sensor and we've all been educated about "Chief Ray Angle" but methinks the salesman was simply trying to sell. You'll not likely get in too much trouble in photography if you take your questions to FM. There are quite a few knowledgeable people here willing to lend a hand. AND you might want to consider some manual focus lenses. Great lenses can be bought for a song... and they work. If you doubt me, check the last few hundred pages of the Manual Focus Nikon Glass thread. Folks from around the world are sharing some pretty fine work produced with OLD lenses mounted on digital cameras.



Jun 08, 2013 at 03:17 PM
molson
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #19 · p.1 #19 · "designed for digital" lens


beanpkk wrote:
I just visited my local camera shop, where they told me that oldish lenses like the Nikkor 35mm f/2.0D designed for film will not work as well on a digital camera as newer lenses designed for digital cameras.


While there is some truth to this, it's really only applicable to certain lens designs (such as ultra-wide lenses for rangefinder cameras). In practical terms, it's more of a marketing ploy that was developed by a certain camera company that abandons its product line every few years, and needed to convince consumers to buy their latest products.



Jun 08, 2013 at 03:43 PM
Chestnut
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #20 · p.1 #20 · "designed for digital" lens


FredAz wrote:
There is a hint of truth to this.
Image sensors have an angle known as the "CRA" or Chief Ray Angle" that is the maximum angle that light can cleanly enter the photo-site. Although a much greater issue in small imagers like cell-phones, it does apply to early, front-lit sensors. The outer edges of the image circle provide by some lenses is coming in at significant angle and might exceed some sensors' CRA.

Newer BSI imagers suffer less from the problem since the photo well is less deep.


+1

I was going to say that... but FredAz said it better than I could have.

Earlier DSLR cameras did indeed suffer from light coming at the sensor at shallower angles, and they modified the lenses so light would come out closer to straight at the sensor. However, that's much less of an issue now as FredAz explained.

But that was also not always necessary, and varied by lenses. Some older lenses worked perfectly fine as is, without any changes... it all depends on the lens itself. I've used the 35/2, and it can perform fairly well on a modern sensor.



Jun 09, 2013 at 04:29 PM
1
       2       end




FM Forums | Nikon Forum | Join Upload & Sell

1
       2       end
    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Reset password