Home · Register · Search · View Winners · Software · Hosting · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Photo Critique | Join Upload & Sell

  

Archive 2013 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography
  
 
Kaden K.
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


at IO1 Symposium (more video to be posted soon)

http://kadenca.tumblr.com/4



May 19, 2013 at 05:31 AM
Camperjim
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


I managed to make it almost all the way thru the 3 short videos. I did this because I do have an interest in how photography relates to more classical art. Even with my interest I had a real hard time listening to these videos. I could only think about the poor students who have to attend full courses from this Columbia U faculty member.

This is a great place to learn about such fascinating topics as: dehierarchizing the face while mitigating a sense of projection in portaiture.



May 19, 2013 at 11:01 PM
dmacmillan
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


Camperjim wrote:
I managed to make it almost all the way thru the 3 short videos. I did this because I do have an interest in how photography relates to more classical art. Even with my interest I had a real hard time listening to these videos. I could only think about the poor students who have to attend full courses from this Columbia U faculty member.

This is a great place to learn about such fascinating topics as: dehierarchizing the face while mitigating a sense of projection in portaiture.

Huh?

That's all above me. I only have a B.F.A. (with Honors) from a lowly trade school named Art Center College of Design.

It makes me think of Art School Confidential



May 20, 2013 at 04:48 PM
Camperjim
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


So did you watch the videos? Don't go by my assessment. I have virtually no formal training.


May 20, 2013 at 05:16 PM
Kaden K.
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


There are 8 videos from this lecture but unfortunately Alan was
limited to how much he can put up monthly on Vimeo without a
paying account. More to come, for sure.

This was a lecture at The Center for Alternative Art in NY at the
daguerreotype exhibit symposium and hence the interest of the
impact of classicism in modern daguerreotypy and contemporary
photography.


Lyle Rexer is an instructor at School of Visual Arts in NY and has
written various books including one on Photography's Antiquarian
Avant-Garde Processes, to which he makes reference. He also
mentions abstraction in photography and post-modernism's impact
in contemporary art photography.

I would also add that seldom do I find a commercial photographer
that is able to "parler" his/her photographic acumen into art and
those that can are the few exceptions to the rule. Really two very
different mind sets, different ways of perceiving the world and even
differing levels of obsession.

The same way that most people who use the term "fine art" before
the word photography haven't got the foggiest of what that means.
Needless to say, most of those who actually have a grasp of what
it is, seldom use those terms.

(my personal opinion)







May 20, 2013 at 11:35 PM
Camperjim
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


Kaden K. wrote:
....................
The same way that most people who use the term "fine art" before
the word photography haven't got the foggiest of what that means.
Needless to say, most of those who actually have a grasp of what
it is, seldom use those terms.


You might want to pass this on to Lyle and the administration at the School of Visual Arts. I was interested enough to look at the schools webpage and found that the school is dedicated to teaching fine arts and design and in the field of photography they teach commercial and fine art photography.



May 21, 2013 at 01:29 AM
Kaden K.
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


They fortunately know what they speak of as obviated in the video.

Is this what you speak of - http://www.sva.edu/undergraduate/photography

Aaaah, now that I saw your website I understand. You are both commercial & fine art.
Not a personal issue you know.






Edited on May 21, 2013 at 03:59 AM · View previous versions



May 21, 2013 at 02:04 AM
Camperjim
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


I have no idea what these videos obviated.

If you liked the videos, that is great. Let's just say they were way over my head and I was not able to appreciate them.



May 21, 2013 at 03:58 AM
Kaden K.
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


OK. Thanks for the candor.


May 21, 2013 at 03:59 AM
dmacmillan
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


Camperjim wrote:
So did you watch the videos? Don't go by my assessment. I have virtually no formal training.

I watched most from the link. I also watched some other videos on YouTube. I did some more reading and found that Lyle and I would take some of the same photography books to a desert island, especially the book with the photographs of Jacques Henri Lartigue. Others on my list include the work of Frederick Evans, Clarence White, Diane Arbus, Bill Owens and Cindy Sherman, who he mentioned.

You statement regarding formal training implies some doubt on your part on the appropriateness to respond.

Do you need to be formally trained to have a valid opinion? Let's consider music appreciation. I like all types of music. I feel my training as musician and my knowledge of music theory enhances my enjoyment of some types of music, but that knowledge is not necessary for me or anybody else to be emotionally engaged or moved by it. By the same token, there is some music, for instance 12 tone music, that I find as an interesting concept but I can't stand to listen to. Mark Twain's famous quip is an excellent summary: "Wagner's music is actually better than it sounds."

I encourage you to have an open mind and look at different types of photography, but if you don't like it, don't feel it's because you're not educated enough or sophisticated enough.

Art Center has a well respected Fine Art course of study both in photography and other media. I enjoyed the fine art courses I took while I was pursuing my degree.

Of course we'll never agree on the definition of "Fine Art" photography. My definition is that it is photography that is done because the photographer can't help themselves. Clarence White and Jacques Henri Lartigue are excellent examples. They aren't shooting for photojournalistic reasons or on commission to create an image in a commercial environment (portrait, wedding, commercial/industrial, etc.). Using that defintion, I define myself as a fine art photographer because I am solely motivated by my love of photography and the need to create images.

Even commercial photography can become fine art. One of my favorite photo books is "Champion Pig", a collection of commercial photographs taken by local commercial photographers in the 1950's. Many of the photos are as surrealistic as anything done by Diane Arbus.

Although not all those involved in "Fine Art" photography are like this, I've noticed some traits that leave me cold. They are:
1)Self Importance - They think they are the cat's meow.
2) The "E" words - Elitism and Effeteism. Many think they are "above" the rest of us and put down people who are so coarse that they use photography to make a buck.
3)Pseudo-Intellectionalism. They make an industry of producing dense writings with convuluted language that would make Washington's best bureaucrats proud.

Personally, I have no time for navel gazing. I'm too busy doing, not talking about it.



May 21, 2013 at 02:21 PM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



RustyBug
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


Doug,

Effeteism ... is a new word for me ... google/dictionary rendered denotation, could you expand a touch on intended connotation? I'm pretty sure I've got sense of it, but just to nail it down a bit in societal context, I'd appreciate if you could expand on it some.



May 21, 2013 at 02:39 PM
dmacmillan
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


Effete: Marked by self-indulgence, triviality, or decadence:


May 21, 2013 at 02:43 PM
RustyBug
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


Gotcha, thanks.




May 21, 2013 at 03:13 PM
Camperjim
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #14 · p.1 #14 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


dmacmillan wrote:
I watched most from the link. I also watched some other videos on YouTube. I did some more reading and found that Lyle and I would take some of the same photography books to a desert island, especially the book with the photographs of Jacques Henri Lartigue. Others on my list include the work of Frederick Evans, Clarence White, Diane Arbus, Bill Owens and Cindy Sherman, who he mentioned.

You statement regarding formal training implies some doubt on your part on the appropriateness to respond. ...........


The OP was kind enough to post a link to a lecture and I then proceeded to say how little I like it. This was my way of bowing out of the conversation. Training or not, I found this talk to be boring and pretentious gibberish. How is that for some descriptive words?



May 21, 2013 at 04:12 PM
Kaden K.
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #15 · p.1 #15 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


CamperJim not everyone has to like Lyle Rex's lecture.

On the other hand, I would say that Lyle has been a very influential person in the world of art photography and shaping up tomorrow's thought process in these matters of past/present/future trajectory. This is an issue of particular relevance to contemporary daguerreotypists as they
revive hundred years old practices and seek relevance in the field of contemporary art.




May 21, 2013 at 04:54 PM
RustyBug
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #16 · p.1 #16 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


+1 @ Kaden's niche arena is not for the masses, but still it is good to be shared for those who may find it interesting.

Some days I can really get into, other days not as much (I passed on the vid's this time, noted for later). That can usually be said for most any niche' / subset ... e.g. some folks may find macro to be uninteresting, while others live for it. Some folks live for mono, for others crayons are there thing.

No worries for those who drink milk vs. those who eat meat vs. veggies only. Our palette's can be wide or narrow, but I think that we do all share the desire to improve in our chosen arena's ... and sometimes we might enjoy a little exploration into other taste's too. Contemporary daguerreotype is somewhat of an acquired taste, imo, so no worries if this one didn't strike a chord with a given person today.

As always, thanks for sharing.



May 21, 2013 at 08:05 PM
Camperjim
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #17 · p.1 #17 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


If you do decide to look at these videos, I suggest you skip the videos from Lyle Rexer or at least same them for last. The Grant Romer videos towards the bottom of the link are way better. He helps explain his interest in daguerreotypes and he does so without being pompous and pretentious. You will however need to listen to "ah" "ah" about 25 times/minute.


May 21, 2013 at 09:09 PM
Kaden K.
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #18 · p.1 #18 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


Thanks RustyBug.

I would easily say that the Contemporary Daguerreian Community is on the move
and growing fast, thanks to some great individuals who refuse to let the best ever
process die. I'll share 2 daguerreians that excel: Takashi Arai (who has a project
making a dag a day) and Eric Mertens (who does amazing portraits):

http://vimeo.com/14472775#at=0
http://www.takashiarai.com/


http://www.thedaglab.com/


Camperjim although both Lyle and Grant have different styles they are both great.
Grant Romer is a brilliant and humorous man as one can see on his lecture on
Southworth & Hawes, which ends with a very ironic twist. Often the audience is
in laughter while he speaks because he loves being congenial.



May 22, 2013 at 02:31 AM
Camperjim
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #19 · p.1 #19 · Lyle Rexer's talk on Photography


I can only imagine the level of hilarity that must permeate the crowd of daguerreotype connoisseurs. I take it you have had the joy of attending these talks in person. There is nothing like being in a crowd of people with similar interests.


May 22, 2013 at 04:14 AM





FM Forums | Photo Critique | Join Upload & Sell

    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Reset password