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Archive 2013 · Shooting in golden hour WB question
  
 
Liquidstone
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p.4 #1 · p.4 #1 · Shooting in golden hour WB question


I'm acutely color-blind, and always dependent on my teenage son to set the WB of my RAW conversions. As such, I'm amazed that fellow photogs who have no color-recognition issues find the WB settings of certain shooting conditions a challenge.

If I can't get WB advice from my son, I usually just convert using the camera's AWB.






May 15, 2013 at 05:19 AM
Glenn NK
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p.4 #2 · p.4 #2 · Shooting in golden hour WB question


Photon wrote:
In the spirit of Austin's post, let me suggest that every photographer who wants to master digital color reproduction should train by shooting exclusively under a mix of sodium and mercury vapor lamps, as well as each alone. Between the incomplete spectra and the rapid cycling of color temperature, one quickly learns how to deal with the problem: by relinquishing all hope of a perfect and repeatable solution.


I'm thinking that sometimes we over-think things, and I think this is one of those times.

For any and all images, I adjust in post to what I remember seeing (subjective of course), and perhaps more importantly, what I like. I try not to go overboard so as to make it not believable to others.

In effect, there is no reality, or one might say that perception IS reality.

I simply cannot imagine how dull a sunset would look if one used a WB card to "get it right".

Glenn



May 15, 2013 at 05:51 AM
Dark Slider
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p.4 #3 · p.4 #3 · Shooting in golden hour WB question


Do we really perceive sunset light as golden, or have we been trained by our experience with film that that is what we should expect from photographs? I'm not talking about the sunset itself, rather perception of a white subject under late afternoon light.

I can only suggest shooting in raw, without [significantly] clipping any channels, and adjusting in post to achieve your photographic vision. AWB is likely a good starting point, but it is not going to create what film would have seen, and perhaps what you are expecting to see.

This is an interesting subject, but I treat post production as a part of the creative process, and one that I am in control of. Color balance, like focus, is a knob that can be turned and manipulated to achieve a desired end result (far more so than in film days.) You either grab the bull by the horns, or ignore it and get what life gives you.



May 15, 2013 at 05:53 AM
timbop
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p.4 #4 · p.4 #4 · Shooting in golden hour WB question


As Fred said, the whole point of shooting during the golden hour is to get the warm light. Funny thing is, I posted some portraits from golden hour in the wedding forum and got roasted for not fixing the white balance.....

The consensus seems to be shooting raw with WB in the 5200K-5500K range - which I agree with. That essentially "balances" the picture for midday - leaving the golden hues intact.

On the other side of the coin, when I shoot blue hour shots with tungsten light for fill I use tungsten WB - which really brings out the dark blue hues of the sky



May 15, 2013 at 11:44 AM
gdanmitchell
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p.4 #5 · p.4 #5 · Shooting in golden hour WB question


Glenn NK wrote:
I try not to go overboard so as to make it not believable to others.


Believable is a very good standard for much photography - far better than the chimera of "real" or "accurate." All photographs lie and all photographs present a subjective view of the thing - by the nature of photographs and how they are produced, literal "accuracy" is impossible, and the sooner people understand that and what it implies, the sooner they can get on with making photographs.

In effect, there is no reality, or one might say that perception IS reality.

And more than some thing that we imagine to be "reality," what we really want to experience in a great photograph is how the photographer saw and felt the thing. I like to say that a great photograph most often tells us more about the photographer than about the supposed subject of the photograph. Last weekend I was reminded by John Sexton of something that I had heard before, which I'll paraphrase as a photograph is about both what is in front of the camera and what is behind the camera.

Dan



May 15, 2013 at 02:57 PM
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