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Archive 2013 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...
  
 
gugs
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p.2 #1 · p.2 #1 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...


Mine is ok, too. It is an excellent camera. Only small things, like said above, prepare to use bigger cards (16GB was my standard, I moved to 32GB). Disk space is not really an issue, I had lots of TBs anyway on several NASes. In the field, shutter speed is more critical than with other cameras and this is not an action camera (sometimes takes 'forever' to empty the buffer to the card). If you are aware of this, the D800 is among the best cameras I have used.

Guy



May 05, 2013 at 01:45 PM
Dpedraza
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p.2 #2 · p.2 #2 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...


BenV wrote:
While people did have some issues with early models, the issues had the internet megaphone effect. It's safe to buy one now.

yeah I agree it's like those stupid lawsuit commercials on tv. my d800 is fine and focuses perfectly fine.



May 05, 2013 at 05:31 PM
EB-1
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p.2 #3 · p.2 #3 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...


wizb2013 wrote:
I have been holding back buying the Nikon D800 (new)
after reading all the focusing issues. So has the issues been
addressed in the latest units from the factory? Anyone who
bought a D800 recently care to comment or provide some
data points? Thanks.

PS: I hate the idea of buying a new $2.8K camera and finding out
I have to either return it (eating return shipping cost) or dealing
with Nikon repair services (which could be hit or miss...)


There is no complete certainty. Buy it from a reputable dealer, test and return if necessary.

EBH



May 05, 2013 at 05:39 PM
ckcarr
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p.2 #4 · p.2 #4 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...


How can you go back in the water if you've never gone in the water?

My D800e is Sn# 350

It's been fine. I was an early adopter.

There's an old saying "Throw the baby out with the bathwater."
So assess your intended usage and make a determination.
Landscapes, no brainer. But, what are you going to do with the camera?

Anyway, buy one from Amazon, B&H, or Adorama - test it (without racking up 10,000 shots), return it if there is a real problem (not an imaginary one). The reputable dealers will work with you.






May 05, 2013 at 05:40 PM
wellsjt
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p.2 #5 · p.2 #5 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...


Nikon_14 wrote:
A few things are certain:

1) Your workflow will take 3x longer w/ 36mp files;
2) You will need to 3x more HDD and memory cards;
3) You'll need to double your shutter speed to avoid blur.


These are certain, are they?

If you have a halfway decent computer #1 is not true. I use LR and have no issues and no significant slowdown in workflow. Importing images does take longer, but that's only one part of the workflow. I don't find working with the photos and exporting JPGs slower. As far as #2, it depends again on your equipment (eg. if you were already maxing out your HD or memory cards with a much lower res camera, then yes, you may need to look at updating). #3 is a myth and is wrong.



May 05, 2013 at 06:11 PM
Kerry Pierce
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p.2 #6 · p.2 #6 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...


Nikon_14 wrote:
A few things are certain:

1) Your workflow will take 3x longer w/ 36mp files;
2) You will need to 3x more HDD and memory cards;
3) You'll need to double your shutter speed to avoid blur.

wellsjt wrote:
These are certain, are they?

If you have a halfway decent computer #1 is not true. I use LR and have no issues and no significant slowdown in workflow. Importing images does take longer, but that's only one part of the workflow. I don't find working with the photos and exporting JPGs slower. As far as #2, it depends again on your equipment (eg. if you were already maxing out your HD or memory cards with a much lower res camera, then yes, you may need to look at updating). #3 is a myth and is wrong.


I have used the same computer since about 2005. It was high end for its day, but certainly needs replaced. I don't have any huge issues editing my d800 files, but I certainly notice the difference and on complex operations, it certainly can consume a lot more time. This is especially true when saving backups to external hard drives over USB. Glacial is the word that comes to mind.

Storage, however, is certainly a problem. You can't put 20lbs of crap into a 10lb bag. I had plenty of room on my main image drive on my system, about 40% free of 500gigs. The free space dwindles at alarming rates now. I have to be much more ruthless about culling the best shots out of the batch, which was something I simply never worried about with 12mp cameras.

As for #3 being a myth, I would like to know your thinking on this, because it seems to imply that no extra effort is required to achieve the same levels of acuity that one can achieve with a 12mp camera. Is that what you're saying?

thanks
Kerry



May 05, 2013 at 06:55 PM
wellsjt
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p.2 #7 · p.2 #7 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...


Kerry, as I said, #1 and #2 depend on your equipment. If for example you're running an 8 year old PC and have small hard drives, USB 1.1 instead of USB 3, etc., then yes, things could be slow. But that would hold for the new 24 MP cameras out now too. Those raw files aren't exactly tiny either.

On the shutter speed issue, that was a hot topic of conversation when the D800 came out: Small pixel pitch, need higher shutter speeds to avoid blur due to this, etc. Basically, a general message that you can't use the D800 normally: You need to use a tripod or super-fast shutter speeds all the time. That's what I react to, because it's wrong and it's a myth. A lot of comparisons I saw involved people comparing D800 images at 100% vs. cameras of lesser MP at 100%. To do this comparison properly, you need to downsize the D800 image to be same, then compare. When this is done properly, you don't really see any proof that higher shutter speeds are required.

Of course good shooting practice helps with the D800 like it does with any camera.



May 05, 2013 at 07:47 PM
gugs
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p.2 #8 · p.2 #8 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...


I don't want to restart the discussion but a higher shutter speed is definitely needed if you want to exploit the pixels, that's mathematical. If you compare at a similar resolution, it does not matter, but then why use a D800 in the first place ? I don't think that comparing a D3 @12MP with a D800 @12MP is a 'proper' comparison, I want 35 correct and 'sharp' megapixels.

Guy



May 05, 2013 at 07:57 PM
Mark_L
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p.2 #9 · p.2 #9 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...


wellsjt wrote:
These are certain, are they?

If you have a halfway decent computer #1 is not true. I use LR and have no issues and no significant slowdown in workflow. Importing images does take longer, but that's only one part of the workflow. I don't find working with the photos and exporting JPGs slower. As far as #2, it depends again on your equipment (eg. if you were already maxing out your HD or memory cards with a much lower res camera, then yes, you may need to look at updating). #3 is a myth and is wrong.


I agree these are overstated but tests in the wedding forum have shown most operations taking 3x as long as a 12MP file.

The problem is most people keep EVERY RAW file they ever shoot forever and ever (why?) and import ALL their RAWs into LR rather than using photomechnic/faststone to quickly cull beforehand (again, why?) I don't use any faster shutter speeds on the D800E to the D700, the D700 still needed 1/160 with an 85mm for pixel level sharpness. 36MP is always going to be as good or better than 12MP, anything is better than upsampling.

My first shoot with my D800E I shot 1600 frames over 8 looks, culled 70% in photomechanic and retouched 1 per look in PS all on my 6 year old PC. No drama.



May 05, 2013 at 08:05 PM
 

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Kerry Pierce
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p.2 #10 · p.2 #10 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...


wellsjt wrote:
Kerry, as I said, #1 and #2 depend on your equipment. If for example you're running an 8 year old PC and have small hard drives, USB 1.1 instead of USB 3, etc., then yes, things could be slow. But that would hold for the new 24 MP cameras out now too. Those raw files aren't exactly tiny either.

On the shutter speed issue, that was a hot topic of conversation when the D800 came out: Small pixel pitch, need higher shutter speeds to avoid blur due to this, etc. Basically, a general message that you can't use the D800 normally:
...Show more

My thinking is the same as Guy's, [gugs]. I rather doubt that most folks buy a d800 so they can get the same levels of detail that they can get with a 12mp camera. I know that I did not. It's not really that big of a deal to keep in mind that shutter speeds often need to be higher and technique is more important, than it used to be.

I'm talking about the times when you're shooting hand held, especially in poor lighting. It should go without saying that if one wants to extract max IQ from any camera, then excellent support, lenses, and technique are mandatory. But, most of us don't expend that kind of effort for the majority of our shots.

I think that we are in agreement. Thanks for the clarification.
Kerry



May 05, 2013 at 08:40 PM
Kerry Pierce
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p.2 #11 · p.2 #11 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...


Mark_L wrote:
I agree these are overstated but tests in the wedding forum have shown most operations taking 3x as long as a 12MP file.

The problem is most people keep EVERY RAW file they ever shoot forever and ever (why?) and import ALL their RAWs into LR rather than using photomechnic/faststone to quickly cull beforehand (again, why?)


I don't pretend to speak for others, but my answer to these questions is simple. Until now, I had no need to delete a ton of files. I had massive storage space on my system, at least it was considered massive until a couple of years ago.

I have files going back over 10 years. Why do I keep them? Because I knew that editors would always get better, as would my skill levels in processing. I still sell photos that I took when I was in Washington DC, in 2004. But, I always use the latest editing tools to see if I can make the photos come out better.

thanks
Kerry



May 05, 2013 at 08:47 PM
Jonathan
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p.2 #12 · p.2 #12 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...


Mine is great, and since the new firmware seems even better. I would never part with this one.

I shot a senior prom last night and practically all keepers. Detail is amazing and I couldn't care less about file size, etc.



May 05, 2013 at 08:48 PM
wizb2013
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p.2 #13 · p.2 #13 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...



I am the OP for this discussion thread.
From what I have gathered so far with the responses,
it seems that the focusing issue is still a problem and
it appeared to be a roll of dice. (granted that the odds appeared to
be in favor of one getting a good unit) I have a PM exchange
with one guy who indicated that he got a new D800
a few weeks ago and that unit has the left focus issue.

I will make sure that if I decide to get one, I'll get one
from dealers that have good return policy.
I DON'T want to deal with Nikon repair especially
with a brand new 2.8K camera.

Thanks for all the inputs.
BTW, I own only Canon 35mm stuffs (pretty old/dated ones..) and I
am thinking of switching to Nikon. I shot medium format for a
long time (645, 6x9..) in the past and do mainly landscape photography.




May 05, 2013 at 08:55 PM
Kerry Pierce
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p.2 #14 · p.2 #14 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...


If I were in your position, I'd be quite pleased. The stuff you have to choose from is incredible. I've only owned Nikon dslrs and I'm very happy with the d800, but if I were looking, I'd also be looking very hard at the 5dIII. Indeed, it wasn't so long ago that I was thinking of buying a 5dIII and the main reason that I didn't was because there isn't a 7dII, with the same AF as the 5dIII.

But, I decided to stay with Nikon, so I bought the d800.

No matter what camera you buy, you have double trouble over the average user. The average guy looking to buy the d800 or 5dIII already has modern lenses that he's already tested. Only the folks looking to switch camps and guys like you have to test both the new camera and new lenses at the same time. That can be a problem, determining if a given fault is with the camera or the lens.

Whether you stay with Canon or buy a Nikon, if you get good lenses and body, you've got a really fine kit, IMO.

good luck
Kerry



May 05, 2013 at 11:15 PM
Grantland
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p.2 #15 · p.2 #15 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...


wizb2013 wrote:
in the past and do mainly landscape photography.



Looks like a Nikon D800 is the way to go.

I shot Canon for many years and they have some excellent lenses but the change has been good for me.

This D800 is am awesome camera!

Grant



May 05, 2013 at 11:33 PM
runamuck
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p.2 #16 · p.2 #16 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...


For wizb2013 it will NEVER be safe, regardless of how perfect the camera is.


May 05, 2013 at 11:49 PM
wizb2013
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p.2 #17 · p.2 #17 · Is it safe to go back in the Nikon D800 water...


Kerry Pierce wrote:
No matter what camera you buy, you have double trouble over the average user. The average guy looking to buy the d800 or 5dIII already has modern lenses that he's already tested. Only the folks looking to switch camps and guys like you have to test both the new camera and new lenses at the same time. That can be a problem, determining if a given fault is with the camera or the lens.

Whether you stay with Canon or buy a Nikon, if you get good lenses and body, you've got a really fine kit, IMO.

good luck
Kerry
...Show more

You are absolutely spot-on w.r.t. my "double trouble" situation.
That's why I posted this discussion thread to see if Nikon fixed the focusing
issue for the D800 in the latest batch. My plan is to buy the
24-70mm f/2.8G ED with the D800. The thought of all the testing work
I need to do (and the worrying) to ensure I didn't get a defective new
camera is indeed holding me back.



May 06, 2013 at 12:02 AM
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