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Archive 2013 · Digital photo archive can die fast
  
 
Michael White
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p.2 #1 · Digital photo archive can die fast


Right now I'm working on my solution I have a 3tb time machine, a 3 tb stora and on order a 4 tb buffalo NAS plus the following drives and backup devices wd3tb, 2tb, 1tb my books, a 1tb ColorSync UDMA II, a 1 tb USB drive to backup the ColorSync in the field. I plan on at least two physical 1tb HDD in my lapto and Mac mini plus a raid of 4 2tb HDD in my desktop. The time machine will do hourly backups of my computers the stora will be upgraded to 4tb and store my photos, music and movie files with the buffalo backing it up plus storing my downloaded files and document plus those that I create. Another buffalo will be purchased and wire in off site to backup all the above off site.

For my photos the plan is shoot dump cf card to ColorSync,backup ColorSync in the field ( 3 copies , cf card, ColorSync, and bu of ColorSync). When return to room or studio burn DVD of cf card, import into LR from ColorSync , verify DVD erase cf card in camera. Go through ingest, keywording, and rating backup LR and images to a backup on the stora. Continue workflow under develope module, bu LR and files. Do this backup upon completion of each module once files are completed do final backup and burm final files to DVD. The hourly bus will be scheduled to be deleted after two days of daily backups are done. Eventually the my books will be used to alternat weekly backups and stored elsewhere off site. Ans swaped out weekly.
The key is no file is older than a month from time of writing so you don't give the chance to have bits to lose data. Different raid formats for different advantages the raid one allows drive to be rebuilt mirror copies drive as it is written etc. good archival DVDs stored properly and copied annual to avoid lose data on the original and final files. I also convert all raw files to dng format to make it easyier to maintain. Eventually a full server farm will be used to insure my digital media prevails. I still need to convert my negs to dng plus photos and pubs that I have no negatives for using my flatbed scanner. I hope to have this complete system in place by the end of the year. The only thing missing is an cloud storage but that can be expensive as currently I'm looking at 2 tb for photos, 1 tb for music and podcasts, 2 tb for movies/DVDs, and another 2 tb for files.

In the sort term I need 4 x1 tb 2.5 HHS, 8x 2tb 3.5hdds with future plans for 6x4tb 3.5hdds and a wd my book to cover the stora, time machine and both buffaloes plus two each large enough for weekly backups. Al had that get replaced will be used for project drives so no waste there. I developed this system after reading the Dam Book and watching chase Jarvis's workflow vid. It hardware may not be the same quality or cost but the idea is similar . How much is you data worth. Mine is priceless thus the effort to prevent any loss of data more than an hours work.



May 22, 2013 at 06:10 AM
rico
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p.2 #2 · Digital photo archive can die fast


Michael, it sounds like a comprehensive plan, although perhaps a few too many moving parts and disparate technologies.

BTW, the 50TB of tape mentioned in my previous post does not mean you need 50TB of live storage to back up. Customary usage is some division of those (20) tape cartridges for incrementals, and an offsite repository. For example, 7+7+6 would allow a 17.5TB Level 0 to reside offsite, a 17.5TB Level 0 in the office, and 15TB of incrementals in the office. When the incrementals are taking too long (due to accumulated change), you swap the Level 0 locations and start again.



May 22, 2013 at 06:41 AM
Tim Wild
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p.2 #3 · Digital photo archive can die fast


I did look into tape, but you're right it's much more expensive than disks.


May 22, 2013 at 08:30 PM
Beni
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p.2 #4 · Digital photo archive can die fast


We are using tape, LTO5 for our backup, it's not just that once you get to the larger amounts it's cheaper but the idea of having data on a disk which may or may not fire up 5 years from now which worries me.


May 23, 2013 at 06:55 PM
rico
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p.2 #5 · Digital photo archive can die fast


Hi, Beni. I'm about to pull the trigger on LTO-5 (current sweet spot for price/GB media-wise). Transfer rates are also very nice @ 140MB/sec native.


May 23, 2013 at 10:15 PM
binary visions
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p.2 #6 · Digital photo archive can die fast


Bump for archival-grade Blu-ray media:

http://www.mdisc.com/millenniata-celebrates-completion-of-blu-ray-optical-disc/

25 GB/disc is not bad. For those that have multi-TB archives, of course, that could get tedious, but if they are indeed archival grade, you could burn a batch and keep them in a safe deposit box or something.



Jun 06, 2013 at 01:48 PM
 

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Neven Prasnika
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p.2 #7 · Digital photo archive can die fast


pulges wrote:
Somehow I'm not quite sure about keeping todays hdd-s inanimate for 5 years without powering up. A bit cautious when reading such things:

A hard drive contains at least a couple of electric motors, and these suffer the most stress during spinup. The longer the moving parts of the motor stay stationary relative to each other, the more likely that the motor will "seize" upon being repowered. Link

Magnetic signals recorded on a hard disk are designed to be refreshed periodically. If your hard disks stay on, this happens automatically. However, if you store your projects to a removable hard drive, then
...Show more

Well... both claims are partially true, but some data in those articles is plain silly. Like one stating that the magnetic properties fade within a year and a half... It may fade all right, but I doubt its one year decay can even be measured.

I do copy ALL my backups to a new media every three to four years though. While my old CDs (15 years or so) are still here, and so are a bit younger DVD's, I use multiple HDDs for storage these days (I have a BD but never use it for backups since I find HDD more reliable and easy to work with). My data sits on three computers + one local NAS drive and a copy NAS swapped on a secondary location more or less once a month (irregular,when I find time... nothing is done automatically).

On a separate (but relevant) note...

For an exhibition in my son's school, I digged out an old Atari ST Mega with 30MB hard and few floppy's... they were sitting ever since 1990 in my shed on temperatures -20 to +45 (Centigrade... I'm from Croatia/EU) and humidity well... let's say that my shed roof needs serious repairs!

I tried to turn it on hoping it'll not burst in flames, and...

Well, not only the hard was working and all the data was still there, even floppy discs were all readable! Some of those were written 25 years ago!



Jul 07, 2013 at 02:09 PM
EB-1
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p.2 #8 · Digital photo archive can die fast


I maintain multiple copies of data and update them every few years. I used CDs for archives in the late 1990s-early 2000s and DVDs for a brief period in the early 2000s, but HDs exclusively for about 9 years. I keep archives and offsite data in containers with CRC so that I can confirm no losses/corruption when updating to newer media types over the years.

I have about 48TB of drives in the main computer and roughly 90-100TB overall, so that is more than average. Much of the data is redundant copies at different sites.

EBH



Jul 07, 2013 at 02:53 PM
BluesWest
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p.2 #9 · Digital photo archive can die fast


...(preferably on different continents.)

Not good enough - what about an asteroid hitting and destroying the Earth? I think to be absolutely safe, you should keep at least one hard drive of images on the Moon (and maybe a second one in orbit around the Earth).

John



Jul 07, 2013 at 07:23 PM
44lefty
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p.2 #10 · Digital photo archive can die fast


You might contact the Smithsonian, as they have been confronting this issue for some time, now. Also, as I understand the write process for disks, there is a real difference between disks written via computer, and those generated with commercial/professional/archival equipment.

Larry



Jul 15, 2013 at 05:49 PM
EB-1
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p.2 #11 · Digital photo archive can die fast


BluesWest wrote:
Not good enough - what about an asteroid hitting and destroying the Earth? I think to be absolutely safe, you should keep at least one hard drive of images on the Moon (and maybe a second one in orbit around the Earth).

John


I have two copies over 3000km apart and the third about 80km from the first. Password protection limits access after I am deceased or have brain damage.

EBH



Jul 17, 2013 at 02:50 AM
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