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Archive 2013 · light
  
 
Alpi07
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p.1 #1 · light


I've tried to use some studio light. Here I was trying some Rembrant light before my model got tired.
I've been told the shadows are totally wrong even if it was not a Rembrant light. Is it technically that poor? Can I have more deep CC please?

Thank you all.




Alpi07 2013

  Canon EOS 5D Mark II    EF50mm f/1.4 USM lens    50mm    f/8.0    1/200s    50 ISO    0.0 EV  




Apr 07, 2013 at 10:28 AM
RustyBug
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p.1 #2 · light


Can you post up the sooc for comparison. The degree of pp makes it a bit challenging to discern between the variables.

As to the shadows (comment from others), are they trying to say that your lighting placed your shadows in the wrong places. Or were they saying that they felt the image showed shadows/non-shadows that were incongruous with where they should be due to changes in post work? Seeing the sooc will help for comparison here.



Apr 07, 2013 at 01:31 PM
Alpi07
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p.1 #3 · light


here

The sentence was simply "as for the last picture (this one) the lighting is simply very bad, sorry"

when asked why, I've been told that it is just not right.

If I had understood I wouldn't have asked here (the person wasn't happy with the PP either)

Just wanted to add that there is a light in the bkg, very visible in the pp




  Canon EOS 5D Mark II    EF50mm f/1.4 USM lens    50mm    f/8.0    1/200s    50 ISO    0.0 EV  




Apr 07, 2013 at 03:52 PM
RustyBug
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p.1 #4 · light


Here's a WB adjustment & some USM to give us something to look at for evaluating lighting.

As to the comment at the lighting being very bad ... I'd suggest that the comment was lacking much information as to what they viewed was the problem regarding the lighting. Part of me wants to think they meant the WB was off and the lighting was kinda flat without much dynamic interest.

Personally, I think the lighting was fine enough (albeit a bit boring & safe). But, having an improper WB (as shot @ 3750) isn't a necessarily a lighting problem, it is a camera WB setting issue (semantics ). Not sure, if you were using AWB and the camera perceived all the yellow in the BG as influence to the recommended WB setting, or if you set it to that temp intentionally for some other reason.

Since it looks like you used some off camera flash (assuming it was around 5000K-5500K), that would be putting a different color light on your subject while your camera was assuming you were being using 3750K colored light. This would account for the cast variance ... an easy fix.

But for me, the lighting is not as problematic as the distracting background. Even though it is mildly oof compared to the subject, the bg still stands out like a sore thumb, with the vertical lines and grain patterns, as well as being a bright tonal value to compete for our attention away from our subject as well as the rogue BG reflections. Possibly another aspect of the "very bad" lighting.

Taking a read on things as to where your OP was and where the sooc was:

1. Move subject away from that BG (both in terms of distance and different BG)
2. Move your light closer to your subject so that you get more rapid falloff to the shadow side
3. Match your camera's WB setting to your lighting

The low contrast/low falloff lighting required you to try and push things harder in PP. Doable, but comes with penalties or requires more extensive effort to minimize the penalties.

Anyway ... my .02.
Chuck & Karen (et al) can speak more to the lighting setup relative to portraiture modeling, etc.

HTH







Apr 07, 2013 at 07:27 PM
AuntiPode
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p.1 #5 · light


Some very basic format portrait lighting set ups:

http://www.sekonic.com/whatisyourspecialty/photographer/articles/the-five-basic-portrait-lighting-setups.aspx

The above set-ups are good, but are set with four lights. I consider four light sources the basic studio light requirement, but it's fully possible to make do with fewer sources by using broad sources and/or reflectors.



Apr 08, 2013 at 04:37 AM
 

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Alpi07
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p.1 #6 · light


Thank you!

I honestly don't know the kelvin of the lights, haven't thought about balancing my camera (which as in awb) whit the light. will do. It was a simple Elincrhorm Quadra.

I believe that for learning, I will start with an Elincrhom duo, so I can afford 4 lights instead of two. they are only 200w, but I suppose for 1 - 3 persons basic portrait they should do.

AuntiPode, thank you for the link. Do you have any idea is the book is a good buy in order to learn lighting?

Does anyone know a good book about it? Something that goes behind the "ready recipes" and actually teaches how to light.






Apr 08, 2013 at 07:47 AM
RustyBug
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p.1 #7 · light


Flash temperature is typically around 5000k-5000K. I looked at the product manual for the Quadra and didn't see any spec saying what the K temp was, but just go with the flash icon (same as if you were using a hotshoe flash) on your camera and you should be fine. Post up a question over in the Lighting Forum, and I'm sure someone there will have a more definitive answer @ the Kelvin temp. The indication that you did actually use AWB, explains the color shift with the camera trying to contend with all that yellow.



As to a book that teaches how to light, the go to for a baseline reference on lighting by many is considered to be:

Light: Science & Magic
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/light-science-and-magic-fil-hunter/1100697225?cm_mmc=googlepla-_-textbook_instock_26to75_pt107-_-q000000633-_-9780240812250&cm_mmca2=pla&ean=9780240812250&isbn=9780240812250&r=1

It isn't going to give you "ready recipes" ... but, instead it addresses a multitude of conditions and scenarios relative to the physics (in a layman's language) of how light behaves and how we garner control of those unchanging behavioral characteristics of light. It is a good read and comes highly recommended by many FM'ers ... many good ones over in the Forum.

The link is to version 4, but there aren't going to be many changes from version 3 since light hasn't changed any since Creation so there is really no reason a person shouldn't have this in their library for reference. You'll certainly want more "application specific" books like Karen has recommended as they will steer your toward the nuances of the subject, whereas Light: Science & Magic is instructive @ light behavior as it works through (and builds upon) a variety of advancing scenarios.

It is a must read, imo, no matter what genre you're shooting. That way, when an "application specific" recommendation is being made, you can see the rationale behind what it is intended to help you achieve.

Understanding relative to your subject genre (i.e. portraiture, flowers, cars, industrial, scenic, etc.), and understanding light itself ... then putting the two together @ how you envision and want to present them is limitless. I think you are good to approach understanding vs. formulaic emulation (although it can be a quick result producer). It takes a bit longer to digest ... but once you've got it, it's like the difference between being a chef or reading from a recipe card, it starts in your head and comes out of you, rather than you replicating someone else ideas.






Apr 08, 2013 at 01:53 PM
Alpi07
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p.1 #8 · light


Yes thanks! I have that book and I'm actually reading it
It's just that sometimes I feel it's not enough, and I have problems into practice what I know. (Still it is extremely interesting and clear)

At times I have the feeling to try to hold some blob in my hands, if I grasp focus, wb will slide out, I hold it and exposure try to escape... So frustrating this tridimensional learning



Apr 08, 2013 at 03:53 PM
AuntiPode
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p.1 #9 · light


I learned the basic lighting set-ups in a photography class at University many many years ago. I just found the above link by googling "Rembrandt lighting". I'd suggest searching Amazon and reading the book reviews for basic lighting books. Also, I'd recommend learning how to light with simple incandescent lights in photoflood reflectors so you can see how the light looks as you change positions. Trying to learn lighting with flash is doing it the hard way.


Apr 08, 2013 at 09:13 PM
Alpi07
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p.1 #10 · light


Thank you!


Apr 09, 2013 at 12:11 PM





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