Home · Register · Search · View Winners · Software · Hosting · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | General Gear-talk | Join Upload & Sell

  

Archive 2013 · Effect of direct sun on sensor
  
 
ben egbert
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Effect of direct sun on sensor


As I was recently shooting mesa Arch into a direct unfiltered sun, I started wondering what this does to the sensor. I was using live view and immediately turned it off between shots.

I have been doing this for years and see many others do it too, but this has to be tough on the sensor and possibly other electronics. Especially when you are bracketing for shadows and the sun is heavily blown so that you are not getting protection from a small aperture.

I don't recall seeing any warnings other than not leaving live enabled too long. Does anyone have a good answer?



Mar 31, 2013 at 02:53 PM
Mescalamba
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Effect of direct sun on sensor


On CMOS, usually nothing. What can kill surely sensors are lasers, sun is usually ok. I mean, how many photos with sun in composition you saw?

Tho maybe not best idea during peak hours (around 12 - 2). I would probably avoid LV during that time.. Anyway, most ppl dont shoot landscapes during those hours.

Btw. I shot quite a few shots (including HDR) with old Panasonic G1 (which is live-view only device) into sun, and nothing happend. So Im assuming that unless you really push it (LV left for half an hour focused on sun) its fine.



Mar 31, 2013 at 03:09 PM
Guari
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Effect of direct sun on sensor


I don't know the answer Ben, but I'm also interested.

I have seen a couple threads here and there about the sun killing a sensor though... when left like 20 minutes or so...



Mar 31, 2013 at 03:18 PM
Mescalamba
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Effect of direct sun on sensor


Guari wrote:
I don't know the answer Ben, but I'm also interested.

I have seen a couple threads here and there about the sun killing a sensor though... when left like 20 minutes or so...


Well, its like burning ant with loupe.. If you are that devious being. Short time is ok, wouldnt try it for long.



Mar 31, 2013 at 03:37 PM
rchb
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Effect of direct sun on sensor


You can think of a pixel diode as a valve that’s actuated by light. Direct sunlight will turn it 100% on (saturate it!) and the digital data reflects that value. The shutter duty cycle also eliminates any exposure concern in normal photographing. The extreme test conditions beyond the cameras normal intended use IE 20 minutes ON saturated are just that!!! With regard to lasers in public use, the power level and duty cycle on exposure to sensors shouldn’t be a concern again other than the same blooming effect of full sunlight. However, these lasers shouldn’t be construed as safe for direct eye exposure.

Rick



Mar 31, 2013 at 05:26 PM
Guari
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Effect of direct sun on sensor


Mescalamba wrote:
Well, its like burning ant with loupe.. If you are that devious being. Short time is ok, wouldnt try it for long.


yes yes, agreed



Mar 31, 2013 at 05:29 PM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



EB-1
Offline
• • • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Effect of direct sun on sensor


rchb wrote:
You can think of a pixel diode as a valve that’s actuated by light. Direct sunlight will turn it 100% on (saturate it!) and the digital data reflects that value. The shutter duty cycle also eliminates any exposure concern in normal photographing. The extreme test conditions beyond the cameras normal intended use IE 20 minutes ON saturated are just that!!! With regard to lasers in public use, the power level and duty cycle on exposure to sensors shouldn’t be a concern again other than the same blooming effect of full sunlight. However, these lasers shouldn’t be construed as safe for
...Show more

That is fine, but you need to look at the temperature. A semiconductor can only heat a finite amount before it is damaged. Depending on the magnification and aperture of the lens and local solar irradiance, the energy absorbed may generate excessive temperatures despite any IR/UV/AA filters.

It is also possible to damage other components in the mirror box, such as the shutter when the mirror is up. Most of the components are black, which allows them to absorb plenty of energy.

EBH



Apr 02, 2013 at 04:48 AM
rchb
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Effect of direct sun on sensor


EB-1 wrote:
That is fine, but you need to look at the temperature. A semiconductor can only heat a finite amount before it is damaged. Depending on the magnification and aperture of the lens and local solar irradiance, the energy absorbed may generate excessive temperatures despite any IR/UV/AA filters.

It is also possible to damage other components in the mirror box, such as the shutter when the mirror is up. Most of the components are black, which allows them to absorb plenty of energy.

EBH


I’m very familiar with semiconductor performance and thermal characterization. Please be a little more specific as to a situation exceeding my terminology “normal photographing” or “cameras normal intended use”?

Ben et al were looking for a little affirmation that they wouldn’t be compromising the camera sensor while photographing with direct sun light. Please enlighten me if I am in error. Also, is there a reason to raise the mirror for long periods of time in direct sunlight?



Apr 02, 2013 at 06:45 AM
Ian.Dobinson
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Effect of direct sun on sensor


rchb wrote:
!! With regard to lasers in public use, the power level and duty cycle on exposure to sensors shouldn’t be a concern again other than the same blooming effect of full sunlight. However, these lasers shouldn’t be construed as safe for direct eye exposure.

Rick



Have a look at the video in this link , you may change your view on that

http://www.petapixel.com/2010/07/28/what-laser-light-can-do-to-your-precious-dslr-sensor/



Apr 02, 2013 at 08:39 AM
ben egbert
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Effect of direct sun on sensor


rchb wrote:
I’m very familiar with semiconductor performance and thermal characterization. Please be a little more specific as to a situation exceeding my terminology “normal photographing” or “cameras normal intended use”?

Ben et al were looking for a little affirmation that they wouldn’t be compromising the camera sensor while photographing with direct sun light. Please enlighten me if I am in error. Also, is there a reason to raise the mirror for long periods of time in direct sunlight?


Before getting the 5dmkIII I never used live view for extended periods, the 1DS-mk3 was not a great live view camera. But the 5dmkIII is and I have become very dependent on it. It is so easy to just watch the scene changing on live view and snap the shutter when the sun position is ideal for a sunburst.

However as soon as I thought of the possible damage, I started shutting it off between shots.



Apr 02, 2013 at 02:23 PM
rchb
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Effect of direct sun on sensor


Ian.Dobinson wrote:
Have a look at the video in this link , you may change your view on that

http://www.petapixel.com/2010/07/28/what-laser-light-can-do-to-your-precious-dslr-sensor/


I’ve studied that video in the past over and over again alongside of another video and it’s suspect at best. I’m guessing those green lasers above the crowd are Argon at about 30~35mW but the light sources galvo scanning the crowd are white. The only way that’s going to be coherent light is if you multiplex coherent RGB sources. Why would you want to do that? If the white source is in fact non-coherent, the power level is meaningless and it would be understandable why it would be allowed to scan a crowd. If it is coherent, the liabilities are unfathomable and the operators would be very familiar with that!!! With regard to the sensor, pixels are addressed in rows and columns and each independently conducts across an intrinsic material regulated by light levels. When the light source is high, the pixel reads bright IE white. If a pixel has a catastrophic failure as implied here, it would be more attuned to an open fuse and the pixel would go dark. Also, the laser was able to perfectly align and take out an entire pixel row and leave them all conducting. Really? That’s pretty good shooting!!! And lastly, when a 30mW (That’s 30/1000 of a Watt!) 1mm coherent point source goes screaming across a large area in milliseconds, how long did it have time to stop by a 6 micron area and warm it up? Oh! And a wee bit of attenuation and beam spreading from the air particulates!!! All good questions and no DPA analysis!!! Should I change my view?



Apr 02, 2013 at 04:04 PM
runamuck
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Effect of direct sun on sensor


Guari wrote:
yes yes, agreed

A magnifying glass will take the sun's rays and focus them in a 1/4 inch circle. That will fry an ant. Doing this as a kid required about a 3 inch magnifying glass. Using a lens, however, is rather iffy. Figuring 95% of the light gets through an element, by the time it gets through 13 elements, there isn't a whole lot left.

Ordinary window glass passes 76% of the light. I am using 95% because I have never found a statement as to how much light a piece of lens glass will pass, but I think it has to be far higher than window glass.



Apr 02, 2013 at 05:01 PM





FM Forums | General Gear-talk | Join Upload & Sell

    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Reset password