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Archive 2013 · Workflow between PS and LR
  
 
Luta13
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Workflow between PS and LR


For some of the more experienced retouchers, what file type are you using to move between PS/LR and back and forth. I am learning PS and still on a trial copy. I am downloading my pics into LR as I have always done. But when I have an image I know I want to make PS adjustments to I have been saving as a .PSD and loading into PS. When I am done in PS, I will save image once again in .PSD and bring into LR and make all my usual adjustments to curves, etc. When I am done I export final as a .JPEG from LR.
Is this what most do? Any issues with doing it this way? Any need to use .TIF or any other file type?



Mar 16, 2013 at 02:43 AM
James_N
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Workflow between PS and LR


Your workflow appears to be unnecessarily complicated. Once you open your file(s) in Lightroom, do all the processing you can possibly to there. If the file(s) still need additional adjustments that can only be done in Photoshop, press the CTRL + E keystroke combination (the Edit in Photoshop command) and Lightroom by default will automatically transfer a 16-bit TIFF to Photoshop. There's no need to manually export a PSD file out of Lightroom and then open it into Photoshop.

You can then edit the TIFF file in Photoshop and once completed, click on the Save command and the edited file will be saved and automatically stacked in Lightroom with the original file. Then if you still need a JPEG, simply export it out of Lightroom.

Note that what I've described here is the default behavior of the interaction between Lightroom and Photoshop. You can certainly modify how they interact by editing Lightroom's preferences. For example if you want to send a PSD to Photoshop instead of a 16-bit TIFF you can change it in Preferences. You can also change the color space that your file is initially rendered in but I don't advise that unless you understand what you're doing.

I'm also curious as to why you'd edit a file in Lightroom, send it to Photoshop, then bring it back for basic adjustments like Curves. All those adjustments should be completed BEFORE sending the file to Photoshop; then if it still needs additional color and tonal adjustments do them in Photoshop. The Curves functionality in Photoshop is still much more robust than what you'd find in Lightroom.



Luta13 wrote:
For some of the more experienced retouchers, what file type are you using to move between PS/LR and back and forth. I am learning PS and still on a trial copy. I am downloading my pics into LR as I have always done. But when I have an image I know I want to make PS adjustments to I have been saving as a .PSD and loading into PS. When I am done in PS, I will save image once again in .PSD and bring into LR and make all my usual adjustments to curves, etc. When I am done
...Show more



Mar 16, 2013 at 04:51 AM
Luta13
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Workflow between PS and LR


James - Thank you for the in-depth reply. I do need to get better at PS so that I further understand the more robust features. I discovered a cause for some part of my problem late last night. CTRL + E was not working to transfer the file. As it turns out, I needed an update to Camera Raw 7.3. Now transfers from LR to PS are seamless and i dont have to go through the above hassle. Thank you.

Since you asked, and it it would help my understanding to hear from people more experienced, here is why I was working with LR, then PS, and then LR again:

I have been using LR for some time and want all my pictures downloaded into LR for cataloging and organisation. I will make most of my adjustments in LR because its faster and seems a bit easier to work with. I feel as though I can do 80-90% of my photo editing in LR only.
Once I have brought my photos into LR, I will occasionally see a photo that I would like to make a PS only adjustment to, such as adding a blur to a moving vehicle or making an unsightly power line disappear. If I want to do this I have been taking the unedited, but converted, file and sending to PS, making changes to the very particulars that I can only do in PS, and sending it back to LR to make adjustments to whitebalance, exposure, highlights shadows, etc.
Is this not Okay to do? I know PS probably has a more robust system for editing items on photos but will it make that much of a difference if I make the adjustment to, say highlights, in LR versus PS?

For fun, here is a shot I downloaded into LR with rest of card, identified a need for PS (in this case using some motion blur on crowd, rotational blur on wheels, and a gradient mask left to right to increase blur behind rider), made the adjustments in PS, and brought back into LR for all the global wb, highlight, shadow, sharpening, adjustments:

2013 Daytona Supercross by Luta13, on Flickr



Mar 16, 2013 at 01:10 PM
James_N
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Workflow between PS and LR


I really think you should work on streamlining your workflow; I realize that some of the complication is because you aren't familiar with Photoshop but I don't see the need to be making round trips between Lightroom and Photoshop and then back to Lightroom. The key is to do all your global adjustments to color and tone in Lightroom first. Then send the file to Photoshop for the specific or "local" adjustments that can't be done in Lightroom. The general rule in post processing is that you address the global or non-specific adjustments first, then do the local or specific adjustments after. From your description it seems you're doing the locals first then the general in Lightroom.

But if you must make the trip from Lightroom to Photoshop and then back to Lightroom I'd suggest using "Open as Smart Object" command in the Edit In menu. By clicking on the layer thumbnail in Photoshop, you can then reopen and re-edit your image in Adobe Camera Raw (note, not Lightroom) after sending it from Lightroom to Photoshop.



Mar 17, 2013 at 04:03 AM
Luta13
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Workflow between PS and LR


Okay. Good advice. Thanks James. I'll work on all the global edits first in LR and then move over to PS for final work and export final JPEG from there. Appreciate the advice.


Mar 17, 2013 at 12:17 PM
BigBadWolfie
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Workflow between PS and LR


James is right. It's often recommended that you adjust photos in the order that LR has it (that is you adjust the white balance and exposure first). It's really best to do as much on LR as possible before sending your files to PS. If you "get it right" in LR, you don't have to do as much in PS.

I myself haven't figured it all out myself, as I make long roundtrips from LR to PS. I like to use Nik filters so I try to send a relatively flat image to PS (I adjust the white balance and exposure and off to PS I go). I then do noise reduction and other adjustments in PS. After that, I do my cropping and use Nik's sharpening software so I end up sending Tiff files back to PS for whatever output/print.



Mar 18, 2013 at 07:52 PM
 

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Alan321
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Workflow between PS and LR


Luta13 wrote:
Okay. Good advice. Thanks James. I'll work on all the global edits first in LR and then move over to PS for final work and export final JPEG from there. Appreciate the advice.



If you do those global adjustments first in Lr then you have a working photo in Lr that can be re-processed in different ways at any time, just like all of your other photos.

At the point at which you have a decent image that needs some Ps sauce you initiate the Ps edit from Lr, do the work in Ps, and then simply save the edited file while in Ps. Saving it will automatically return it to Lr and that returned image will be in your Lr catalog. No importing or exporting required, but check your Lr external edit settings to get it right. Working this way has pros and cons associated with the way the interface works - unless you had Ps take the file from Lr as a Smart Object then any changes that you subsequently make to the original in Lr will not be reflected in the file that was returned to Lr by Ps. That can be good or bad depending on your needs.

You can also save your files as named snapshots in Lr when they are exported to Ps just so that you know what was done to them and why they differ. Plus you can branch your Lr editing into different versions without any significant storage overheads.


Another reason for doing global edits in Lr before editing in Ps is that you will have a better idea of whether or not the image can be brought up to the required standard (e.g. salvaging highlights or shadows) before you spend the time editing in Ps.

- Alan



Mar 20, 2013 at 10:53 AM
sjordan93436
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Workflow between PS and LR


One reason to go back to LR is to find your photos. I use keywording, stars, and collections. My problem is that under certain conditions LR loses track of keywords in the round trip.

I have win 7 64 machine and CS6 64. When I select images by keyword and then edit in photoshop, LR does not recognize its keywords. It has been replicated at Adobe and they will fix it soon.

My workaround is to select the image, go to the folder, then edit in PS.

I have found over time, that photoshop is _quicker_ and better than lightroom on global issues. There is a steep and deep leaning curve to get there. PS is different. On snapshots and web posts of reasonably exposed images, LR is fine.

For example, I had a series of images with shadow and highlight problems. Shadow / highlight in PS had far more control than the sliders of LR>



Mar 21, 2013 at 05:02 PM
Alan321
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Workflow between PS and LR


sjordan93436 wrote:
For example, I had a series of images with shadow and highlight problems. Shadow / highlight in PS had far more control than the sliders of LR>


Are you talking about raw images or others ? Raw handling was supposed to be identical, I thought, and if you were doing the processing in Ps instead of Lr then you would very likely process the raw files rather than convert first and then process the converted files. I don't know for sure because I just use Lr for pretty much everything at this stage.

- Alan




Mar 23, 2013 at 06:41 AM
Jman13
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Workflow between PS and LR


I don't export to Photoshop at all...I don't like having that intermediary TIFF unless I know I'm going to keep an edited copy, which I often don't. (I do if I prefer the edits in photoshop). If you have the latest versions of Lightroom and Photoshop, you can just open the RAW file directly into Photoshop with the Lightroom edits. I just right click and select "Edit In->Adobe Photoshop CS6". The RAW file then opens in Photoshop. I work on the RAW file, and if I have changes that I like, I just click Save, and then the TIFF with my edits is created, and it's roundtripped in Lightroom, so the TIFF is added to the Catalog.

It's actually one of the main reasons I upgraded to CS6 from CS5...to preserve the ability to open RAWs directly to Photoshop.



Mar 25, 2013 at 03:20 PM
sjordan93436
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Workflow between PS and LR


I do "edit in" option. That sends a tiff to PS. I do not use ACR. In other words, LR is only doing a light conversion. In PS, the shadow highlights adjustment has three sliders. Some use a default system. I adjust when needed. Not all photos need or can use it. The LR 4 shadows is much better than the prior version. It is just the Photoshop's shadow / highlights are more powerful and configurable. I had a series of jpg's that had bad shadow highlights and PS saved the day. I also find that the tools in Photoshop especially tough images do better with less artifacts.

PS is tough to learn and expensive. Normal images from modern cameras and good conditions work okay with LR. For an amateur, Photoshop is a "tar baby."



Mar 25, 2013 at 03:54 PM





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