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Archive 2013 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?
  
 
Jeephoto
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


Which Nikkor, AF or MF, zoom or prime, would be a good wide-angle choice for Architecture? I shoot DX; D90, D7000. Looking for low-or no- distortion. Speed not important. Possibles are: 12-24 Dx, 25-50 ais, 20mm 4.0 ai prime. Any suggestions?




Mar 13, 2013 at 10:39 PM
lukeb
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


IMHO 24mm f/3.5 PC-E


Mar 13, 2013 at 11:04 PM
Zebrabot
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


skip the 20mm if you're worried about distortion.






Mar 13, 2013 at 11:10 PM
ADCOLE
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


I would suggest the Tokina 11-16 if you are shoot DX.


Mar 13, 2013 at 11:51 PM
VinnieJ
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


A TS lens would be in order to meet your low/no distortion requirement.


Mar 14, 2013 at 04:06 PM
jamgolf
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


Like others have suggested already a T/S lens such as the Nikkor 24mm PCE would be a good choice. Other brands also make T/S lenses for Nikon F mount eg. the upcoming Samyang 24mm t/s or Hartblei, Arsat and others.


Mar 14, 2013 at 07:31 PM
rffffffff
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


thread hijack attempt: I have a 14-24, I think it would be an awesome choice for architecture, but I know little... Here's the question... I assume it depends on how close and how tall something is, but for a given building, how does the T/S 24 compare in final output to the 14-24 in terms of usable FOV?

clarification: if I stand close to a building and shoot it at 14mm, then 'undistort' it in post, I might end up with an effective 20mm crop or 28mm crop or something like that... is there any way to quantify what that crop is and compare it to the 24mm t/s?



Mar 14, 2013 at 09:09 PM
ChrisDM
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


You're in luck, the Nikon 12-24 is a miracle of distortion-free glass in a world of distorted glass. It is flat out the least distortive zoom lens in Nikon's lineup. In fact it has less barrel distortion that the 24PC-E at most focal lengths!! Your search is over.

The 14-24 is ruled out by lack of filter threads (and price, and weight...) Circular polarizers are key to my exterior work, to eliminate glare from windows, and of course to make sky and clouds look great.



Mar 14, 2013 at 09:23 PM
wil_ret
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


ChrisDM,
I use my 14-24 with the Fotodiox filterholder and Pola filter.
It works very well!
W



Mar 15, 2013 at 05:26 AM
ChrisDM
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


wil_ret wrote:
ChrisDM,
I use my 14-24 with the Fotodiox filterholder and Pola filter.
It works very well!
W


Thats a lot of unnecessary expense, bulk, weight and apparatus for architecture photography unless you absolutely need 14mm. As a working professional I strive for business efficiency, and the ROI isnt there for that lens/filter holder setup. If measuring corner sharpness at maximum aperture is a hobby of yours and you've got money to burn then more power to you.

But of course the point is mute as the OP shoots DX, where the Nikkor DX12-24 easily beats the 14-24 for distortion control and is wider to boot. Oh and a LOT less expensive, much lighter, accepts filters without an expensive adapter etc etc.



Mar 15, 2013 at 12:54 PM
 

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pr4photos
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


When I shot DX the Tokina 11-16mm is what I used and I honestly haven't found better on DX or FX


Mar 15, 2013 at 02:54 PM
Andre Labonte
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p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


10-24 DX


Mar 15, 2013 at 06:47 PM
sic0048
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p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


The "secret" to using a non tilt/shift lens is that the lens must be completely level and plumb. If the lens is tilted on either plane, you will get distortion that can be very hard to get rid of in PP.

The beauty of a t/s lens is that you can tilt the lens to get the composition that you need, and then correct the distortion using the t/s feature so that you get a distortion free shot in camera.

If you are really serious about taking architectural pictures, a t/s lens is absolutely required. You might be able to get away with using a regular lens for a little while, but the t/s in invaluable for this type of photography.



Mar 15, 2013 at 07:31 PM
Tommy_D
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p.1 #14 · p.1 #14 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


sic0048 wrote:
If you are really serious about taking architectural pictures, a t/s lens is absolutely required.


Absolutely required may be a bit extreme. Its not absolutely required. A tilt-shift lens can offer you compositions you may be able to get with a standard wide angle lens, but it is certainly not a requirement. I shoot with my Nikkor 12-24/4 almost exclusively for interior architecture shots and it does fine. It needs distortion correction in post, but you will get distortion with any lens.



Mar 15, 2013 at 09:18 PM
Jammy Straub
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p.1 #15 · p.1 #15 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


I've used the 12-24 successfully. I do agree if you do it professionally you'll likely want a shift lens.


Mar 16, 2013 at 02:21 AM
ChrisDM
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p.1 #16 · p.1 #16 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


Tommy_D wrote:
Absolutely required may be a bit extreme. Its not absolutely required. A tilt-shift lens can offer you compositions you may be able to get with a standard wide angle lens, but it is certainly not a requirement. I shoot with my Nikkor 12-24/4 almost exclusively for interior architecture shots and it does fine. It needs distortion correction in post, but you will get distortion with any lens.


"Absolutely required" is more than a bit extreme, it is just false, unless you're shooting very tall buildings in a tight urban environment. I've been shooting commercial and residential real estate professionally for over 5 years now and have come across the need for a tilt shift lens only one time. The basis of this misconception of "absolutely required" is poor camera position. When many shoot interiors, they have the camera too high, causing them to have to "shoot down" into a room, causing converging lines. Conversely, when shooting exteriors many get too close to the structure and have to shoot up at it, once again resulting in converging lines. And this is where the tilt shift lens may be necessary: If you're shooting a very tall structure in a tight place, you may not be able to back up or get high enough (however if a neighboring building is in your way just shoot from that building ).

And also remember in this scenario: When we view a tall structure with the naked eye, guess what we see? Converging lines. You can leave a little convergence for very tall structures, especially viewed up close. This is how we naturally see them. For interiors they are pretty much a no-no, but once again they can look natural for very tall, close structures as this is how we see them naturally.



Mar 16, 2013 at 11:57 AM
akul
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p.1 #17 · p.1 #17 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


I think it may depend on the client. If you are shooting for architect or for architectural magazines, I imagine T/S would still be required. They tend to be rather conservative / boring. - My opinion from designer point of view, not from a photographer.


Mar 16, 2013 at 12:03 PM
lxdesign
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p.1 #18 · p.1 #18 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


24mm T/S


Mar 16, 2013 at 12:31 PM
dubaiphil
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p.1 #19 · p.1 #19 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


No one's mentioned if the 24 T/S will have enough clearance on a D7000 body

I thought not...



Mar 16, 2013 at 03:05 PM
Tommy_D
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p.1 #20 · p.1 #20 · Best Nikkor for Architecture?


That is very true. When Nikon designed the D3,D300, and the D700 they intentionally raised up the penta prisim and the flash to allow clearance for the new T/S lenses that were coming out around the same time. They did not do this for the D90 and all subsequent follow up cameras to that model, ie. D7000 and D7100. The 3000 and 5000 series cameras are also built a bit smaller and dont have enough clearance for the T/S lenses to be fully operational.

This makes me wonder if the D600 has enough clearance as it is based off the D7000 platform. Also since the D800 has an entirely new body (not a successor of the D700 body) I wonder if it has enough clearance.



Mar 16, 2013 at 04:50 PM
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