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Archive 2013 · D7100 high ISO samples
  
 
rd4tile
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p.1 #1 · D7100 high ISO samples


Looks like the production cameras are starting to get out there. A guy posted some high ISO samples on DPR FWIW:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/51030751



Mar 13, 2013 at 03:07 PM
rd4tile
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p.1 #2 · D7100 high ISO samples


Another shot comparing the 7100/800E

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/51030236

More chroma noise in the 800E shot?



Mar 13, 2013 at 03:23 PM
hjanssen
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p.1 #3 · D7100 high ISO samples


When you test iso , you have to dim the light too to maintain the same shutterspeed. Even a D70 was good at 1600 iso in bright sunlight.


Mar 13, 2013 at 03:27 PM
snapsy
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p.1 #4 · D7100 high ISO samples


hjanssen wrote:
When you test iso , you have to dim the light too to maintain the same shutterspeed. Even a D70 was good at 1600 iso in bright sunlight.


That's why the shutter speed is usually scaled (faster) for High ISO testing. The method by which light is reduced at the sensor doesn't matter - a lower ambient LV or higher shutter speed produce the same lighting density on the sensor.



Mar 13, 2013 at 03:35 PM
NathanHamler
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p.1 #5 · D7100 high ISO samples


snapsy wrote:
That's why the shutter speed is usually scaled (faster) for High ISO testing. The method by which light is reduced at the sensor doesn't matter - a lower ambient LV or higher shutter speed produce the same lighting density on the sensor.



It absolutly DOES matter!! Shooting high iso when there is little or NO shadow detail, is stupid, stuff always looks great....i've shot f22 macro stuff in full sun at iso 4000 on a d7k that looks like iso 100...



Mar 13, 2013 at 03:51 PM
snapsy
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p.1 #6 · D7100 high ISO samples


NathanHamler wrote:
It absolutly DOES matter!! Shooting high iso when there is little or NO shadow detail, is stupid, stuff always looks great....i've shot f22 macro stuff in full sun at iso 4000 on a d7k that looks like iso 100...


What you're describing is a lower exposure level (and/or higher dynamic range scene). My point was that any given exposure level can be achieved by either reducing ambient LV or by increasing shutter speed - there is no difference which method is used since light density is intensity x time. This means a "low light" scene can be reproduced in sunlight and a "high light" scene can be produced at night.



Mar 13, 2013 at 04:00 PM
dannywkyang
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p.1 #7 · D7100 high ISO samples


I think what they're trying to say is that high ISO should really be tested as you would use it in real life - low light environments.

No one (even Auto ISO) really uses ISO 6400+ when there's good light.



Mar 13, 2013 at 04:05 PM
snapsy
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p.1 #8 · D7100 high ISO samples


dannywkyang wrote:
I think what they're trying to say is that high ISO should really be tested as you would use it in real life - low light environments.

No one (even Auto ISO) really uses ISO 6400+ when there's good light.


Understood, but "low light" means the amount of light the camera/sensor sees, not the amount of light we see.



Mar 13, 2013 at 04:17 PM
paparazzinick
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p.1 #9 · D7100 high ISO samples


snapsy wrote:
Understood, but "low light" means the amount of light the camera/sensor sees, not the amount of light we see.



to make it relevant you need to show examples of images shot in dark settings using high iso.

I shoot weddings and a real example would be an evening shot in a dark church at high iso. not bright day or with flash.



Mar 13, 2013 at 04:33 PM
jtra
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p.1 #10 · D7100 high ISO samples


hjanssen wrote:
When you test iso , you have to dim the light too to maintain the same shutterspeed. Even a D70 was good at 1600 iso in bright sunlight.


No. Amount of light should not matter if other exposure parameters (mainly speed) are adjusted in ISO test.

However, crappy light compared to bright sunlight often differs in white balance. White balance below 4000kelvin means that blue channel has to be amplified much more than in regular day light. This significantly increases noise. So my D90 is sort of ok at ISO 1600 at daylight, but quite crappy at same ISO with low light with orange/yellow compact fluorescent lights.



Mar 13, 2013 at 04:35 PM
 

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Javier Munoz
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p.1 #11 · D7100 high ISO samples


those images look pretty good to me.

I think that wildlife-sports shooters using long lenses will appreciate higher speeds in relatively good light.



Mar 13, 2013 at 05:16 PM
2of9
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p.1 #12 · D7100 high ISO samples


Those images look really good. looks like it will shoot at 6400 without a problem. Darn...now it's going to be this vs a D700...but I so much love the DOF on FF's!! maybe the 7100 will make for a great back up!


Mar 13, 2013 at 06:32 PM
Cubfan
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p.1 #13 · D7100 high ISO samples


Looks like it's a very good thing I clicked the Preorder button on Amazon right after the announcement.


Mar 13, 2013 at 06:37 PM
curious80
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p.1 #14 · D7100 high ISO samples


snapsy wrote:
Understood, but "low light" means the amount of light the camera/sensor sees, not the amount of light we see.


Its not just about the amount of light but also about quality of light. The noisiest APS-C DSLR that I have used was a Sony A100 and even that camera could produce a virtually noiseless ISO1600 shot if I for example took the picture of a white sheet in broad daylight. Whereas in real world low light indoor shots I preferred to not use it above ISO 400.

The first factor is the white balance issue that jtra described above. The second factor is that in low light indoor shots, you get dark shadow areas with very little light. In daylight there is a substantial amount of ambient diffused light which ensures that even the "shadow" areas get a lot of light. At any given ISO the noise in dark areas is much higher than the noise in bright areas. So this combination of artificial lights and dark shadows ensures that in practice the noise performance is much worse in real world low light shots compared to these types of "simulated low light" shots.



Mar 13, 2013 at 06:47 PM
snapsy
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p.1 #15 · D7100 high ISO samples


curious80 wrote:
Its not just about the amount of light but also about quality of light. The noisiest APS-C DSLR that I have used was a Sony A100 and even that camera could produce a virtually noiseless ISO1600 shot if I for example took the picture of a white sheet in broad daylight. Whereas in real world low light indoor shots I preferred to not use it above ISO 400.

The first factor is the white balance issue that jtra described above. The second factor is that in low light indoor shots, you get dark shadow areas with very little light. In daylight
...Show more

Lighting temperature is separate from exposure, and low-spectrum lighting will yield more sensor noise than daylight spectrum due to amplification of the blue channel to adjust the WB. The second factor you describe is not lighting quality but the dynamic range of the scene - you can produce deep shadows in both high-exposure and low-exposure scenes.



Mar 13, 2013 at 07:09 PM
Steve Perry
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p.1 #16 · D7100 high ISO samples


All ISO test shooting arguments aside and based on the photos shown...

Honestly, at least for me, 100-400 looks good, 800 is just OK, and 1600 is looking rough. I don't think I'd personally use 3200+ on this one unless it was an "emergency" or something. I might be too picky though - I don't go much above 3200 on my D4 either



Mar 13, 2013 at 07:27 PM
afm901
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p.1 #17 · D7100 high ISO samples


snapsy,

Don't forget where you are working in the EV range. While the D7100 works in a range of -2 to 19 EV, it might only have a dynamic range of 10 to 12 stops. The sensor is going to exhibit different noise levels at higher ISO settings when photographing scenes in the upper EV range versus the lower EV range.

Moist of the time we use higher ISO settings when we are working in the lower EV range of available light. So, when comparing high ISO performance of two cameras, it doesn't make sense to take photographs in a the higher EV range.

Scott



Mar 13, 2013 at 07:33 PM
snapsy
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p.1 #18 · D7100 high ISO samples


afm901 wrote:
snapsy,

Don't forget where you are working in the EV range. While the D7100 works in a range of -2 to 19 EV, it might only have a dynamic range of 10 to 12 stops. The sensor is going to exhibit different noise levels at higher ISO settings when photographing scenes in the upper EV range versus the lower EV range.

Moist of the time we use higher ISO settings when we are working in the lower EV range of available light. So, when comparing high ISO performance of two cameras, it doesn't make sense to take photographs in a the higher
...Show more

The captured EV range is a function of exposure rather than ambient lighting level. There is no difference in IQ between high LV lighting vs low LV lighting if the absolute exposure is the same. Again, lighting density is intensity x time, meaning intensity and time are interchangeable, short of any minor differences in non-uniform noise from very long exposures (ie, digital reciprocity failure).



Mar 13, 2013 at 07:39 PM
afm901
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p.1 #19 · D7100 high ISO samples


snapsy wrote:
The captured EV range is a function of exposure rather than ambient lighting level. There is no difference in IQ between high LV lighting vs low LV lighting if the absolute exposure is the same. Again, lighting density is intensity x time, meaning intensity and time are interchangeable, short of any minor differences in non-uniform noise from very long exposures (ie, digital reciprocity failure).


X amount of light hitting the sensor for 1/100 of a second is not the same as 10x the amount light hitting the sensor for 1/1000 of a second. The noise characteristics will be different.

This is why you need to test high ISO noise in lighting conditions that you are actually going to use it.

Scott



Mar 13, 2013 at 08:58 PM
time2clmb
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p.1 #20 · D7100 high ISO samples


A fine example of how you can have a whole bunch of book knowledge yet still be completely lacking any experience or applied knowledge in the real world.


Mar 13, 2013 at 09:06 PM
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