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Archive 2013 · Natural Light + Strobe + LED (Blue) lighting Help
  
 
RedOak
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Natural Light + Strobe + LED (Blue) lighting Help


Greets everyone,

So i've come about this situation of a potential client, who has artwork that incorporates LED lighting (incased) with a gently blue hue to it.

The idea is to shoot these art pieces with Natural Light and/or Strobe lights in portfolio white and perhaps in contextual settings (living room or whatnot) with more "natural light".

The problem is the big shift in light temperature; between the LED, lighting the piece (including its LED) with strobes and including environmental lighting (natural).

Any thoughts?



Feb 25, 2013 at 09:44 PM
John Skinner
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Natural Light + Strobe + LED (Blue) lighting Help


Using a device like the Passport Color Checker will ensure you're able to bring back the color YOU saw.

One piece of the workflow has a flaw... they're all flawed



Feb 25, 2013 at 10:28 PM
BrianO
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Natural Light + Strobe + LED (Blue) lighting Help


The strobe (if used) will tend to drown out the LED light, so I suggest using a tripod and dragging the shutter to allow both the lit and the light to record.

Shoot in raw capture for greatest dynamic range and color depth, rather than JPEG.

As John said, get a standardized color/exposure target into at least one frame under the same light as a reference: Color Checker, SpyderCheckr, WhiBal, etc., and use a color-managed workflow.









Feb 26, 2013 at 05:02 AM
RedOak
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Natural Light + Strobe + LED (Blue) lighting Help


Hmm i have a WhiBal, this might do the trick. I'm more worried about the temperature difference in light sources. I guess i'll eyeball it.


Feb 26, 2013 at 04:36 PM
 

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BrianO
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Natural Light + Strobe + LED (Blue) lighting Help


RedOak wrote:
Hmm i have a WhiBal, this might do the trick. I'm more worried about the temperature difference in light sources.


That is an important issue. The blue LED isn't a problem; it's part of the artwork, and is supposed to look blue. But if there's a strong color difference between the ambient light and the flash you'll need to do one of three things: balance the flash to the ambient with gels, overpower the ambient with more-powerful flash, or -- since using a tripod will allow for slow shutter speeds -- shoot under ambient only, possibly using a reflector or reflectors as needed to cover all the angles.



Feb 26, 2013 at 06:49 PM
RustyBug
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Natural Light + Strobe + LED (Blue) lighting Help



When you said "environmental lighting (natural)", I assumed/inferred you are talking about window or skylight. Is this the natural that you were referring?

+1 @ shoot ambient only ... i.e. don't mix light sources of natural ambient and flash (unless your ambient can be at the time of day/orientation that is nearly the same temp as flash ... or you gel your flash to match).

Then you are only trying to determine the correct WB for one light source ... and the "blue" of the artwork is supposed to be blue. As Brian mentions, you can also overpower the ambient with flash ... but that won't give the ambiance of the natural lighting that you've said your client wants, unless you can create a very large source for your flash.

If you do mix light sources, I would consider orienting my flash from the same direction as the natural light so they have a more homogenous effect where the key/shadow/fill are of the same color rather than having some areas be ambient, some flash and some a blend of the two. That or I would use the flash as underpowered omni-fill, so the natural light color overpowers the flash.

While it might seem pedantic, mixing two colors of light will yield three colors in various areas of the scene when they are at cross axis. For many applications, this isn't something that presents a significant issue, but for the artwork ... I stick with ONE COLOR of light source(s) if at all possible.










Feb 26, 2013 at 07:25 PM
RedOak
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Natural Light + Strobe + LED (Blue) lighting Help


Yeah i get that feeling as well, natural light is always better in those circumstances anyways.

I've also been tempted to try the very old trick of double exposure they do in product shots for Alarm clocks and night-time watches.

First exposure is natural light, long, to capture the LED/light from the alarm clock itself.
Second exposure is flash, to capture the environment or the object itself.

That could potentially fix my problem as well. Might need to use an ND filter for that as well.

Ahh possibilities.



Feb 26, 2013 at 08:53 PM





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