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Archive 2013 · Color temp in photoshop
  
 
matt4626
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Color temp in photoshop


I have a kelvin color temperature scale. On it a lower number = warmer - higher number = cooler.

Photoshop RAW Convertor temperature is exact opposite. Adjust to higher number warms the image.....lower cools

What's up with that?



Feb 18, 2013 at 01:00 AM
thedigitalbean
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Color temp in photoshop


Makes sense if you work out what the RAW converter is actually doing. The color temperature slider in the RAW converter allows you to account for light sources at that temperature, so what its doing is to compensate for the human perception of light at that color temperature. For example a 2800K light source is a lower number and so is "warm" as you point out, so to compensate for it and neutralize the colors the RAW converter would need to shift hues towards the cooler tones.


Feb 18, 2013 at 01:11 AM
Eyeball
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Color temp in photoshop


Here is a quick and dirty explanation:

The color (blue/yellow) on the Lightroom or Adobe Camera Raw white balance slider is showing the color that will be applied to balance the Kelvin temp of the raw file.

So for example, to balance to neutral a orange/yellowish tungsten-lit (2850) image, blue is applied. To balance a shot taken with a flash with blue gel (29000), yellow is applied.

So once you have applied white balance to the image, the numerical setting shows the approximate Kelvin temp of the raw file and the slider color indicates approximately what color was applied to make the correction.

Kelvin color temp can also be confusing since we tend to consider blue "cool" and yellow/orange "warm" but since Kelvin is based on heating a "black body radiator" (think a piece of metal), a blue glow is indicative of a hotter temperature than yellow/orange.



Feb 18, 2013 at 01:23 AM
matt4626
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Color temp in photoshop


Thanks...I was guessing that it was the compensating adjustment...now I know!


Feb 18, 2013 at 01:42 AM
James_N
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Color temp in photoshop


Using the White Balance Tool in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4

The Temperature slider scale allows you to set what “should be” the white point of the image based on the Kelvin scale. Some people get confused on this point because they assume that if 3200 K equates to tungsten-balanced film and 5500 K equates to daylight-balanced film, dragging the Temperature slider to the right makes the image cooler and dragging it to the left makes it warmer. In fact, the opposite is true. The key point to emphasize here is that the White Balance controls are used to “assign” the white point as opposed to “creating” a white balance.



Feb 18, 2013 at 01:52 AM





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