Home · Register · Search · View Winners · Software · Hosting · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Alternative Gear & Lenses | Join Upload & Sell

  

Archive 2013 · Filters work best with snow
  
 
PhotosbyAlexis
Offline

Account locked
p.1 #1 · Filters work best with snow


Last week after we got hit with a major snowstorm and 15" of snow, I found many of my shots just had trouble with glare of snow despite filter usage. What filters have you had luck with, brand, style color?


Feb 15, 2013 at 09:34 PM
jcolwell
Online
• • • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #2 · Filters work best with snow


You would use a Circular Polarizer filter to control reflected light. I use B+W MRC KSM filters for this. Other types of filters (except for a Linear Polarizer) would have no positive effect, and could make it worse.



Feb 15, 2013 at 10:11 PM
runamuck
Online
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #3 · Filters work best with snow


Also, shoot with the sun low in the sky. Think golden hour, here, or close to it.


Feb 15, 2013 at 10:35 PM
PhotosbyAlexis
Offline

Account locked
p.1 #4 · Filters work best with snow


Thanks Jcolwell, I just need to work on adding filters and I agree about the low sun. I have to say, nothing better than a fresh snow fall from a storm. Will post some pics eventually of it to get more input.


Feb 19, 2013 at 12:59 AM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



mMontag
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #5 · Filters work best with snow


Posting a pic with exif info will help with a more definitive answer....

Is the "glare" reflective or from overexposure?

A polarizer is most efficient when the light source (sun) is 90* to the subject, from where you're shooting - and some variation of efficiency as to how far off that 90* you may be - i.e. - if the sun is in front or behind the camera shooting the scene, the polarizer has zero effect, except from slowing the shutter speed 1.5 to 2 stops.

Are you exposing properly for "snow" (overly white) scene conditions? Many times a snow type scene will require using a higher (longer) exposure compensation - i.e. - if you're getting a really dark blue sky, you may need a longer exposure. Of course, exposure bracketing is always a good technique for finding that correct exposure.



Feb 19, 2013 at 03:14 AM
RustyBug
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #6 · Filters work best with snow


Specular reflection off snow isn't a whole lot different from specular reflection of a mirror, except that you've got a zillion little mirrors in a zillion directions, associated with AI=AR.

What direction/orientation/type of lighting conditions are you shooting in ... any pics you can post?



Feb 19, 2013 at 03:28 AM
DoubleNegative
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #7 · Filters work best with snow


Polarizing fiter, absolutely will provide the most benefit by removing glare, reflections (from non-metallic objects) and deepen colors. Avoid using on ultra- and even some wider-wides.

Even a neutral density filter (or ND) will help in some cases; as it will allow you to use a wider-open aperture for subject separation/isolation with all that light.



Feb 19, 2013 at 03:55 AM





FM Forums | Alternative Gear & Lenses | Join Upload & Sell

    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Retrive password