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Archive 2013 · Birds of the Philippines
  
 
morris
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p.2 #1 · p.2 #1 · Birds of the Philippines


Great job and it looks like a tricky exposure

Morris



Mar 10, 2013 at 10:47 PM
40Driggs
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p.2 #2 · p.2 #2 · Birds of the Philippines


I enjoyed viewing these unique birds. Nicely captured as well!


Mar 10, 2013 at 10:55 PM
jfwoodman
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p.2 #3 · p.2 #3 · Birds of the Philippines


Wonderful to see these birds, the first shot is my favorite.

Jim



Mar 11, 2013 at 03:10 AM
dolina
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p.2 #4 · p.2 #4 · Birds of the Philippines


Thank you morris, Driggs and Jim.


Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea) by alabang, on Flickr

The Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea) is breeds in colonies in reed beds or trees close to large lakes or other extensive wetlands. It builds a bulky stick nest.

It feeds in shallow water, spearing fish, frogs, insects and small mammals. It will often wait motionless for prey, or slowly stalk its victim. It tends to keep within reedbeds more than the Grey Heron, and is often inconspicuous, despite its size.

It has a slow flight, with its neck retracted. This is characteristic of herons and bitterns, and distinguishes them from storks, cranes and spoonbills, which extend their necks. The long neck of Purple Heron looks particularly snake-like, with more of an S-shape in flight. The call is a loud croaking "krek".

The Purple Heron is one of the species to which the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA) applies.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purple_Heron

Taken at Candaba Wetlands

Settings: 1/2000 ƒ/5.6 ISO2500 800mm



Mar 12, 2013 at 05:18 AM
Lars Johnsson
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p.2 #5 · p.2 #5 · Birds of the Philippines


Beautiful bird and shot Paolo


Mar 12, 2013 at 05:34 AM
dolina
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p.2 #6 · p.2 #6 · Birds of the Philippines


Thank You Lars.


Brown Shrike (Lanius cristatus) by alabang, on Flickr

This shrike is mainly brown on the upper parts and the tail is rounded. The black mask can be paler in winter and has a white brow over it. The underside is creamy with rufous flanks and belly. The wings are brown and lack any white "mirror" patches. Females tend to have fine scalloping on the underside and the mask is dark brown and not as well marked as in the male. The distinction is not easy to use in the field but has been tested with breeding birds in Japan where the female can be identified from the presence of a brood patch. The use of multiple measurements allows discrimination of the sex of about 90% of the birds Subspecies lucionensis has a grey crown shading into the brown upperparts and the rump appears more rufous than the rest of the upperback. The tail is more brownish and not as reddish as in the Red-backed Shrike. Younger birds of lucionensis have brown crown and lacks the grey on the head. Supspecies superciliosus has a broad white supercilium and richer reddish crown. The tail is redder and tipped in white.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_Shrike

Taken at UP Los Banos

Settings: 1/2000 ƒ/5.6 ISO1600 800mm



Mar 15, 2013 at 12:18 AM
birdphotog007
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p.2 #7 · p.2 #7 · Birds of the Philippines


Brilliant shots!

http://www.birderz.com



Mar 15, 2013 at 11:28 AM
dolina
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p.2 #8 · p.2 #8 · Birds of the Philippines


Thanks 007.


Long-tailed Shrike (Lanius schach) by alabang, on Flickr

This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend is not known, but the population is not believed to be decreasing sufficiently rapidly to approach the thresholds under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Source: [url]http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/106007758/0[/url]

Taken in Muntinlupa City

Settings: 1/160 ƒ/5.6 ISO400 800mm



Mar 15, 2013 at 12:21 PM
dolina
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p.2 #9 · p.2 #9 · Birds of the Philippines


Thank you mishele.


Black-crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) by alabang, on Flickr

Despite being fairly ubiquitous on a global level, the slightly unusual nocturnal habit of the black-crowned night heron renders it less conspicuous than most other herons (2) (3) (4). Of moderate size for a heron, this stockily built species has short legs and a short neck, with the male, on average, being the slightly larger of the sexes (2) (5). As its name suggests, the adult black-crowned night heron has a glossy, black cap that extends down the upper back, while the rest of the body plumage generally ranges from white to ashy grey (2) (5). The nape is adorned with two to three long, white plumes reaching up to 25 cm in the breeding season (5). The stout bill is black in colour, the eyes, a piercing crimson, and the legs, yellow-green for most of the year but becoming pink during the breeding season (2) (5). Juveniles are mostly brown, with heavy striping and pale spots, but as they grow towards the adult plumage, become more solidly dark above and pale below (2). Four subspecies that differ subtly in appearance and occupy different ranges are currently recognised: Nycticorax nycticorax nycticorax, N. n. hoactli, N. n. obscurus and N. n. falkandicus (2) (5).(5)[/URL][/SUP].

Source: http://www.arkive.org/black-crowned-night-heron/nycticorax-nycticorax/

Taken in Valenzuela City, Philippines

Settings: 1/640 ƒ/4 ISO400 500mm



Mar 17, 2013 at 10:19 PM
dolina
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p.2 #10 · p.2 #10 · Birds of the Philippines



Blue-tailed Bee-eater (Merops philippinu) by alabang, on Flickr

This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence 30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Source: http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=1179

Taken in Candaba, Pampanga, Philippines

Settings: 1/800 ƒ/8 ISO800 800 mm



Mar 18, 2013 at 11:46 PM
 

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birdied
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p.2 #11 · p.2 #11 · Birds of the Philippines


Beautiful set. So much variety and beautiful colors.

Birdie



Mar 18, 2013 at 11:58 PM
Wayne Willison
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p.2 #12 · p.2 #12 · Birds of the Philippines


This is quite a show. Wonderful images, Paolo. I don't like to pick favorites often, but that Long-tailed Shrike image is awesome.

Wayne



Mar 19, 2013 at 12:12 AM
dolina
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p.2 #13 · p.2 #13 · Birds of the Philippines


THank you Birdie and Wayne.


Yellow-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus goiavier) by alabang, on Flickr

The Yellow-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus goiavier) is a member of the bulbul family of passerine birds. It is resident breeder in southeast Asia from southern Thailand and Cambodia south to Borneo and the Philippines.

It is found in a wide variety of open habitats, but not deep forest. It is one of the most common birds in cultivated areas. They appear to be nomadic, roaming from place to place regularly.

The Yellow-vented Bulbul builds a well-camouflaged but fragile, loose, deep, cup-shaped nest from grass, leaves, roots, vine stems, and twigs. The nest is untidy on the outside, but it is neatly lined with plant fibers. It may be built in a wide range of places from low bushes to high trees. This is a species adapted to humans and may even nest in gardens. The Yellow-vented Bulbul lays 2-5 eggs in February to June.

The Yellow-vented Bulbuls eats berries and small fruits. They also sip nectar, nibble on young shoots, and take some insects.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow-vented_Bulbul

Settings: 1/160 ƒ/4 ISO800 600mm



Mar 20, 2013 at 03:18 AM
dolina
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p.2 #14 · p.2 #14 · Birds of the Philippines



Spotted Munia (Lonchura punctulata) by alabang, on Flickr

The Scaly-breasted Munia or Spotted Munia (Lonchura punctulata), known in the pet trade as Nutmeg Mannikin or Spice Finch, is a sparrow-sized estrildid finch native to tropical Asia. A species of the genus Lonchura, it was formally described and named by Carl Linnaeus in 1758. Its name is based on the distinct scale-like feather markings on the breast and belly. The adult is brown above and has a dark conical bill. The species has 11 subspecies across their range and differ slightly in size and colour.

This Munia eats mainly on grass seeds apart from berries and small insects. They forage in flocks and communicate with soft calls and whistles. The species is highly social and may sometimes roost with other species of munias. This species is found in tropical plains and grasslands. Breeding pairs construct dome-shaped nests using grass or bamboo leaves.

The species is endemic to Asia and occurs from India and Sri Lanka east to Indonesia and the Philippines. It has been introduced into many other parts of the world and feral populations have established in Puerto Rico and Hispaniola as well as parts of Australia and the United States of America. The bird is listed as of Least Concern by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scaly-breasted_Munia

Taken in the Muntinlupa City, Philippines

Settings: 1/1000 ƒ/4 ISO250 600mm



Mar 20, 2013 at 11:27 PM
dolina
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p.2 #15 · p.2 #15 · Birds of the Philippines



Pied Fantail (Rhipidura javanica) by alabang, on Flickr

Pied Fantails are named for their habit of fanning out their beautiful long tails. It has been suggested that by revealing the white tips of the tail, insects are startled into movement.

Pied Fantails eat mainly insects. Unlike their relatives the flycatchers, Fantails forage close to the ground in the dark understorey, perching on a root or low branch, teetering at the ready to launch into flight. They catch their prey on the wing and rarely miss. Their broad bill is ringed with spines (rictal bristles) which may help them catch insects even in the dim light of the understorey.

They move actively in the undergrowth, lurching from perch to perch; dashing in acrobatic flights. They make short flights from one cover to the next. They are generally quite inquisitive and not shy. They hunt alone or in pairs.

Source: pied fantail (rhipidura javanica): info fact sheet, photos

Take at Muntinlupa City, Philippines

Settings: 1/2000 ƒ/4.5 ISO10000 600mm



Mar 22, 2013 at 12:47 AM
dolina
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p.2 #16 · p.2 #16 · Birds of the Philippines



Indigo-banded Kingfisher (Alcedo cyanopectus) by alabang, on Flickr

The Indigo-banded Kingfisher (Alcedo cyanopectus) is a species of bird in the Alcedinidae family. It is endemic to the Philippines, where it is a generally uncommon but locally common resident of the northern and central islands. There are two subspecies, the nominate race, which occurs on Luzon, Polillo, Mindoro, Sibuyan and Ticao, and A. c. nigriostris, which is found in Panay, Negros and Cebu. It forms a superspecies with the Silvery Kingfisher of the southern Philippines.[1]

The Indigo-banded Kingfisher feeds on fish and aquatic insects. It perches on rocks and overhanging branches and foliage and dives steeply into the water to catch its prey. Once caught, it returns the prey to the perch where it is beaten and swallowed. Little is known about its breeding behaviour, although it is known to nest in tunnels dug into the banks of streams and rivers.[1]

Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests.

Source: [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigo-banded_Kingfisher[/url]

Taken at http://www.villaescudero.com/birdwatching.php

Settings: 1/320 ƒ/4.0 ISO5,000 600mm



Mar 26, 2013 at 12:21 AM
dolina
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p.2 #17 · p.2 #17 · Birds of the Philippines



Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) by alabang, on Flickr

The Old World sparrow genus Passer is a group of small passerine birds that is believed to have originated in Africa, and which contains 15–25 species depending on the authority.[10] Its members are typically found in open, lightly wooded, habitats, although several species, notably the House Sparrow (P. domesticus) have adapted to human habitations. Most species in the genus are typically 10–20 cm (4–8 in) long, predominantly brown or greyish birds with short square tails and stubby conical beaks. They are primarily ground-feeding seed-eaters, although they also consume invertebrates, especially when breeding.[11] Genetic studies show that the Eurasian Tree Sparrow diverged from the other Eurasian members of its genus relatively early, before the speciation of the House, Pegu and Spanish Sparrows.[12][13] The Eurasian species is not closely related to the American Tree Sparrow (Spizella arborea), which is an American sparrow.[14]

The Eurasian Tree Sparrow's binomial name is derived from two Latin words: passer, "sparrow", and montanus, "of the mountains" (from mons "mountain").[3] The Eurasian Tree Sparrow was first described by Carl Linnaeus in his 1758 Systema Naturae as Fringilla montana,[15] but, along with the House Sparrow, it was soon moved from the finches (family Fringillidae) into the new genus Passer created by French zoologist Mathurin Jacques Brisson in 1760.[16] The Eurasian Tree Sparrow's common name is given because of its preference of tree holes for nesting. This name, and the scientific name montanus, do not appropriately describe this species's habitat preferences: the German name Feldsperling ("field sparrow") comes closer to doing so.[17]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_Tree_Sparrow

Taken at http://www.villaescudero.com/birdwatching.php

Settings: 1/200 ƒ/4.5 ISO1,000 600mm



Mar 27, 2013 at 01:17 AM
dolina
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p.2 #18 · p.2 #18 · Birds of the Philippines



Black-crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) by alabang, on Flickr

The scientific name, Nycticorax, means "night raven", and refers to this species' nocturnal habits and harsh crow-like call.

In the Falkland Islands, the bird is called "quark", which is an onomatopoeia similar to its name in many other languages, like "kwak" in Dutch and Frisian, "kvakoš noční" in Czech, "квак" in Ukrainian, "кваква" in Russian, "Vạc" in Vietnamese, "Kowak-malam" in Indonesian, and "Waqwa" in Quechua.

Source: Black-crowned Night Heron - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Taken at Villa Encarnation II, Valenzuela City, Philippines

Settings: 1/1600 ƒ/6.3 ISO400 420mm



Apr 01, 2013 at 01:00 AM
dolina
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p.2 #19 · p.2 #19 · Birds of the Philippines



Philippine Bulbul (Hypsipetes philippinus) by alabang, on Flickr

The Philippine Bulbul (Hypsipetes philippinus) is a songbird species in the bulbul family (Pycnonotidae). It is often placed in the genus Ixos, but is better retained in Hypsipetes as long as this is not entirely merged into Ixos, as it is quite closely related to the type species of Hypsipetes, the Black Bulbul (H. leucocephalus).[1]

It is endemic to the Philippines. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests; on Mount Kitanglad on Mindanao for example it is abundant in any kind of primary forest at least between 500 and 2,250 m ASL.[2]

Fledglings of the Philippine Bulbul were recorded on Mindanao in late April, but the breeding season seems to be prolonged as females with ripe ovarian follicles were still found in April and May. Territorial songs are heard at lower altitudes as late as May, while further upslope the birds are silent at that time of year and presumably engaged in breeding activity. The Besra (Accipiter virgatus) has been recorded as a predator of young Philippine Bulbuls, and this or other goshawks might also catch adult birds.[3]

A common and adaptable bird as long as sufficient forest remains, it is not considered a threatened species by the IUCN.[4]

Source: [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippine_Bulbul[/url]

Taken: [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ternate,_Cavite[/url]

Settings: 1/80 ƒ/5.6 ISO160 800mm



Apr 07, 2013 at 07:39 PM
Frogfish
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p.2 #20 · p.2 #20 · Birds of the Philippines


This is a wonderful thread Paolo - the sad thing is that because you are adding shots to the original thread less people (who maybe opened it earlier and saw the original bird shot) will see it than it deserves because they won't open it again. You may be better off starting new threads. Thank you for the information on each bird - i do take the time to read it all and appreciate your efforts in educating us !


Apr 08, 2013 at 04:52 PM
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