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Archive 2013 · Birds of the Philippines
  
 
dolina
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p.1 #1 · Birds of the Philippines



Chestnut Munia, (Lonchura atricapilla) by alabang, on Flickr

The Chestnut Munia, (Lonchura atricapilla) (formerly considered as a subspecies of the Tricoloured Munia Lonchura malacca atricapilla) also known as Black-headed Munia, is a small passerine bird. This estrildid finch is a resident breeding bird in Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Burma, Nepal, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam and Hawaii. Known as mayang pula ("red maya", to distinguish it from the predominantly brownish Tree Sparrow which is also called maya) in the Philippines, perhaps because of its brick red patch on the lower back that shows only when it flies. The Black-headed Munia is the former national bird of the Philippines (the Philippine national bird is now the Philippine eagle).

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chestnut_Munia

Settings: 1/640 /5.6 ISO640 800mm

Taken at Candaba, Philippines



Feb 12, 2013 at 02:38 PM
DonGut
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p.1 #2 · Birds of the Philippines


Nice image and a very attractive bird. Don


Feb 12, 2013 at 02:45 PM
douter
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p.1 #3 · Birds of the Philippines


Beautiful colors on this bird.
Douglas



Feb 12, 2013 at 04:53 PM
Conrad Tan
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p.1 #4 · Birds of the Philippines


Man that's nice Paolo! I've got to get back to my home someday!


Feb 12, 2013 at 04:56 PM
David Leask
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p.1 #5 · Birds of the Philippines


Lovely shot Paolo, well captured
David



Feb 12, 2013 at 06:52 PM
Lil Judd
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p.1 #6 · Birds of the Philippines


Lovely shot Paolo

well done

Lil



Feb 12, 2013 at 08:06 PM
kmunroe
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p.1 #7 · Birds of the Philippines


great lookin bird Paolo.. nicely done


Feb 12, 2013 at 09:38 PM
canon.eos30d
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p.1 #8 · Birds of the Philippines


Very colorful bird on the great perch.

- Tam



Feb 12, 2013 at 09:56 PM
Shasoc
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p.1 #9 · Birds of the Philippines


A very pleasing image, Paolo
Socrate



Feb 12, 2013 at 10:34 PM
KCollett
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p.1 #10 · Birds of the Philippines


That is quite a nice image Paola! Well done.


Feb 13, 2013 at 02:51 AM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



dolina
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p.1 #11 · Birds of the Philippines


Thank you Don, Douglas, Conrad, David, Lil, munroe, Tam, Socreate and Collett.


Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea) by alabang, on Flickr

The Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea) is breeds in colonies in reed beds or trees close to large lakes or other extensive wetlands. It builds a bulky stick nest.

It feeds in shallow water, spearing fish, frogs, insects and small mammals. It will often wait motionless for prey, or slowly stalk its victim. It tends to keep within reedbeds more than the Grey Heron, and is often inconspicuous, despite its size.

It has a slow flight, with its neck retracted. This is characteristic of herons and bitterns, and distinguishes them from storks, cranes and spoonbills, which extend their necks. The long neck of Purple Heron looks particularly snake-like, with more of an S-shape in flight. The call is a loud croaking "krek".

The Purple Heron is one of the species to which the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA) applies.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purple_Heron

Settings: 1/2000 /5.6 ISO2500 800mm

Taken at Candaba, Philippines






Feb 14, 2013 at 05:23 AM
dolina
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p.1 #12 · Birds of the Philippines



Philippine Duck (Anas luzonica) by alabang, on Flickr

Anas luzonica is endemic to the Philippines, being recorded from all the major islands and eight smaller islands. Records since 1980 derive from c.30 localities, most on Luzon and Mindanao. Records from Siquijor and the Sulus remain unsubstantiated. A steep population decline was evident by the mid-1970s, with high numbers recorded at only a few sites in the following decade, e.g. Candaba Marsh (Luzon) which probably supported many thousands in the early 1980s. Subsequent local extinctions and near-disappearances have occurred in several significant sites, including Candaba Marsh and Buguey wetlands (where several thousand were recorded in 1983). Important current areas include Polillo Island (240 seen and an estimated 3,000 present in 1996), Subic Bay (600 seen in 1997), Magat dam (2,000 were seen in 2001) and Malasi lakes (1,320 were recorded in 2002), Luzon. Other recent records come from Mangatarem, Pangasinan (east of Zambales Mountains IBA) where 70 individuals were counted on the Barabac River inside the Manleluag Spring National Park, Cantilan mangroves in Surigao del Sur and from a mangrove fishpond in Bicol Region, Southern Luzon (B. Tabaranza in litt. 2007). In 1993, its population was estimated at 10,000-100,000, but by 2002 fewer than 10,000 birds were thought to remain.

Source: http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=439

Settings: 1/160 /8 ISO320 800mm

These uncaptive birds were recorded in the Philippines



Mar 04, 2013 at 07:08 PM
KF
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p.1 #13 · Birds of the Philippines


Lovely bird shots Paolo!
Well done sir!
Nothing beats the 800

Koen.



Mar 04, 2013 at 08:01 PM
dolina
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p.1 #14 · Birds of the Philippines


Thank you Koen.


Great Egret (Ardea alba) by alabang, on Flickr

With its long, white breeding plumes, orange-yellow bill, and green facial skin, the Great Egret at the height of the breeding season is stunning to behold. Even at other times of the year, when it loses its plumes and its face and bill return to their typical dull yellow, this large, white wader is difficult to overlook. Male and female Great Egrets are similar (38 inches) at all times of the year. The Great Egret is widely distributed across warmer parts of the globe. In North America, the Great Egret breeds primarily in the southeastern United States, with smaller pockets of breeding territory in the Great Plains, the northeast, and in the west. Most of the Great Egrets in the southeast are permanent residents, but those in cooler climates migrate south for the winter, where they may be found along the coast of California, in the southwest, and in Texas. This species also breeds in Eurasia from southern Europe east to east Asia, wintering in North Africa, India, and Southeast Asia. Populations also exist in South America, Australia and New Zealand. Great Egrets live in and around small bodies of water. In summer, Great Egrets nest in colonies, called rookeries, in trees surrounding lakes and ponds. This species utilizes similar habitats during the winter. Great Egrets mainly eat fish, but may also take crustaceans and small vertebrates (such as frogs, lizards, and mice) when the opportunity arises. Great Egrets may be best observed wading in shallow water, where they may be seen plunging their bills into the water to catch fish. It is also possible to see Great Egrets at their rookeries, especially when they return to roost at sunset, or while flying with their feet extended and their necks pulled in. Great Egrets are primarily active during the day.

Source: http://eol.org/pages/1178488/overview

Taken at the International Rice Research Institute, Los Baos, Philippines

Settings: 1/2000 /6.3 ISO640 800mm



Mar 05, 2013 at 06:24 PM
Herb Houghton
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p.1 #15 · Birds of the Philippines


I like that purple heron and the ducks have cool colors


Mar 05, 2013 at 06:31 PM
dolina
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p.1 #16 · Birds of the Philippines


Thank you Herb.


Purple-throated Sunbird (Leptocoma sperata) by alabang, on Flickr

Purple-throated Sunbird (Leptocoma sperata) has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Source: [url]http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=8273[/url]

Taken at UP Los Banos, Philippines

Settings: 1/30 /5.6 ISO1600 800mm



Mar 05, 2013 at 11:34 PM
eyelaser
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p.1 #17 · Birds of the Philippines


Super series! Very enjoyable set of images.
Eric



Mar 05, 2013 at 11:39 PM
sritri
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p.1 #18 · Birds of the Philippines


Lovely shot Paolo. How do you get the GPS info ?


Mar 06, 2013 at 12:49 AM
dolina
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p.1 #19 · Birds of the Philippines


Thank you Eric.

sritri: Apple Aperture 3 has a feature called "Places" that converts location data from GPS-enabled cameras and other GPS devices and then displays it as pins on a Google-powered map. I sometimes do it that way but when I forget I can manually assign photos on a map. It is helpful to me because I know where/when/what was taken and helpful for others who want to know the same data as well. This feature is used on Flickr & Google+ but not by Facebook surprisingly.


Wandering Whistling duck (Dendrocygna arcuata) by alabang, on Flickr

Wandering Whistling-duck (Dendrocygna arcuata) has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). Despite the fact that the population trend appears to be decreasing, the decline is not believed to be sufficiently rapid to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is very large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Source: http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=350

These uncaptived birds were recorded at Candaba Wetlands, Philippines

Settings: 1/1000 /5.6 ISO1250 800mm



Mar 06, 2013 at 09:59 AM
dolina
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p.1 #20 · Birds of the Philippines



Little Egret (Egretta garzetta) by alabang, on Flickr

The little egret is an opportunistic hunter (5), feeding mainly during the day whilst walking through shallow, open water, stabbing prey with its bill (5) (6). It is highly dependent on visual cues when hunting and therefore its feeding is highly affected if the water is not clear (5) (6). It feeds primarily on small fish, which are usually around 1.2 to 6 centimetres in length, but bivalves, crustaceans, and other invertebrates are also consumed (5).

Little egrets breed at different times of the year depending on location. Those populations based in Europe and Asia breed during spring and summer, whilst the breeding seasons of more tropical populations coincide with rainy seasons (5). Little egrets nest in mixed or single species colonies, and lay four to six eggs in single clutch, with the chicks hatching three weeks later and fledging at four weeks old. The chicks will spend a further month in their parents' care before leaving the nest and dispersing (7).

Source: Little egret videos, photos and facts - Egretta garzetta - ARKive

Taken at the International Rice Research Institute, Los Baos, Philippines

Settings: 1/2000 /6.3 ISO500 800mm



Mar 10, 2013 at 09:30 PM
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