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Archive 2013 · D600: green tint
  
 
dholl
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · D600: green tint


Hi all.

I already have an epic sensor dirt spot problem (after one week of use I literally have hundreds of spots, mostly piled top-left...the infamous issue amplified...).

But I wonder if I also have a less common problem...

Ever since my first test-pic with the camera, I noticed a green tint to its images (confirmed by viewing on a calibrated monitor, so not just the D600's LCD). I quickly offset the WB by stepping down from green a few notches. This made the images look better (tho' still not ideal).


Here are two pics (each with a 100% crop), neutral JPG's, no post-processing at all...One is at standard WB, and the other is with the green turned all the way down.

I'm sure you see the green lines...looks like a green version of chromatic aberration, but the lens was stopped down to f8. This green is seen in any image...with or without flash. Only when I take it out of the WB-configuration does its influence wane.


What do you think? Please see pics:











Jan 19, 2013 at 02:11 AM
VinnieJ
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · D600: green tint


Even at f8 if you're really close you're going to get a really shallow depth of field. In that second picture I can see the green fringing behind the focus point and the purple fringing in front of it. The top two look normal to me on my iMac.


Jan 19, 2013 at 02:26 AM
dholl
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · D600: green tint


VinnieJ wrote:
Even at f8 if you're really close you're going to get a really shallow depth of field.


Obviously. Why are you telling me this? You mean that the green tint is simply a case of green chromatic aberration? It seems quite extreme, especially at f/8.


VinnieJ wrote:
In that second picture I can see the green fringing behind the focus point and the purple fringing in front of it. The top two look normal to me on my iMac.


I don't see purple fringing. To me the top two look like they have an unwelcome green tint. What's an imac? Is that a monitor? Is it calibrated?



Jan 19, 2013 at 02:40 AM
JimFox
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · D600: green tint


I second Vinnie's eyeballs. I also see purple fringing in the first one. What happens if you shoot a standard color chart rather then some rope?

Jim



Jan 19, 2013 at 05:05 AM
 

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dholl
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · D600: green tint


JimFox wrote:
I second Vinnie's eyeballs. I also see purple fringing in the first one. What happens if you shoot a standard color chart rather then some rope?

Jim


Ok, but don't you find the green fringing of the first two pics extreme? And can something like that really be wiped out simply by turning down the green WB?

Colour chart is a good idea...I'll see if I can organise it.



Jan 19, 2013 at 05:14 AM
wellsjt
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · D600: green tint


According to the exif of the shots above, the colorspace settings are not consistent between the images. Images one and three contain no embedded color profile, which is a recipe for incorrect/inconsistent colors when viewed (depending on computer, OS, browser, etc.). I agree with Vinnie and Jim, and I also find it difficult to judge anything by this because I have no idea what the correct colors should be and trying to judge colors in a photo with mostly OOF areas with lots of CA is not ideal.


Jan 19, 2013 at 05:30 PM
SloPhoto
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · D600: green tint


Say hello to LoCA (longitudinal Chromatic Aberration)

It is a lens issue, not a sensor one.



Jan 20, 2013 at 01:31 AM
pburke
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · D600: green tint


regarding white balance - shooting jpeg with a monochrome subject puts you in a bad position: the camera is bound to guess wrong not having a lot of contrast or color diversity to go by, and the in-camera conversion ditches the raw data you could have used to correct it.

For images like the examples above, I recommend to get a wibal card, shoot a control image with the card in the frame, and then shoot the actual images as RAW and do the rest in post. You're going to get much closer to what you saw.




Jan 20, 2013 at 01:43 AM





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