Home · Register · Search · View Winners · Software · Hosting · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Canon Forum | Join Upload & Sell

1      
2
       3       end
  

Archive 2013 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question
  
 
Jeff Nolten
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #1 · p.2 #1 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


How about a G1X, 5D3, 17-40, 35 f2 IS, 70-200 f4 IS, with 270 EX, 1.4x, Gitzo 1058 w/ BH25 (1.9 lb) in my checked luggage? My wife will primarily use/carry the G1X, she also wants to use a walking stick/monopod while doing the hikes. So thats 5 3/4 lb. carry-on camera gear for me and about 2 lb. for my wife. I'll feel naked without my trusty 24-105. The Delhi to Bhutan carry-on limit is 17.5x13.5x8 inches and 11 lb.


Jan 16, 2013 at 05:04 PM
hardlyboring
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #2 · p.2 #2 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Just spent 3 months in Nepal with only an X100 an X10 and my wife had an RX100. We did not need anything else. When in Nepal you will have so many other things to worry about. Having huge cameras would totally be a PITA. Forget the big stuff and take something small so that you can travel light and inconspicuously.
With that said the airline restrictions from place to place are a joke. We had to fly back to Kathmandu from Lukla and were only allotted like 15kilos each (15 for me and 15 for my wife) and we ended up bringing back way more than that. A little sweet talking from our Sherpa and perhaps a little money and off we went. I carried on my trekking pack which is a Marmot Compressor pack it def. weighed more than 11lbs.

IMO you are taking way to much gear.



Jan 16, 2013 at 05:17 PM
Sneakyracer
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #3 · p.2 #3 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


hardlyboring wrote:
Just spent 3 months in Nepal with only an X100 an X10 and my wife had an RX100. We did not need anything else. When in Nepal you will have so many other things to worry about. Having huge cameras would totally be a PITA. Forget the big stuff and take something small so that you can travel light and inconspicuously.
With that said the airline restrictions from place to place are a joke. We had to fly back to Kathmandu from Lukla and were only allotted like 15kilos each (15 for me and 15 for my wife) and we
...Show more

I agree with all this!

Realistically unless the trip is purposely for photography (be realistic) then go as light as possible. The heaviest I would take is my 5D3 and 24-105mm IS. Ideally I would also take a small p&s to hang from my backpack straps in front so as to have it accessible.



Jan 16, 2013 at 07:43 PM
Jeff Nolten
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #4 · p.2 #4 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Well, I suppose I could just take my G1X, but eek! Coming back with great pictures of the trip is at least half the purpose of going. But I think the G1X would be just as good at taking yak fat lamp pictures (can't get that out of my brain, thanks Monito) as a 35 IS or the 24-105. So the 17-40 70-200 combo may be all I need for the 5D. Without the 100-400 and 1.4x the 5D3 wouldn't gain much over my current 5D2 so I'd save some money now. No IS on the 17-40 though.

What do you guys think? Thanks for the input.



Jan 16, 2013 at 08:34 PM
Monito
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #5 · p.2 #5 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


I would decide on your optimum kit for the trip, and sell everything that isn't part of it to buy the rest of the optimum kit.

Jeff Nolten wrote:
But I think the G1X would be just as good at taking yak fat lamp pictures (can't get that out of my brain, thanks Monito) as a 35 IS or the 24-105.


You are welcome. While sitting in the glow, you can sip your fermented horse milk.

But a 50 mm f1.8 on the 5D2 would do even better, especially with an ultrapod. You can fit a 50 and Ultrapod in just about any pocket.

Instead of the G1X, you could take a cheap Rebel or a 5D classic and leave the 50 on it and that can fit in a (large) pocket too. Then in the event of 5D2 failure you can still use your lenses. And in fast-paced situations like markets or horse riders you can get wide angle and telephoto shots at the same time.

If you could swing it, sell the G1X (lovely camera though it is) and get a second 5D2. That way you don't have to carry two sets of batteries and an extra charger, though a spare charger is a good idea too. Build your optimum kit around two 5D2s and you will avoid a lot of lens changing and missed shots.

Jeff Nolten wrote:
So the 17-40 70-200 combo may be all I need for the 5D. Without the 100-400 and 1.4x the 5D3 wouldn't gain much over my current 5D2 so I'd save some money now. No IS on the 17-40 though.


You hardly need IS at all on a 17-40 (not my favourite lens though), so don't worry about that. At 28 mm, you can shoot at 1/50 sec on a 5D2 without straining. If you can lean against a wall or sit on the ground or a rock, you can easily go lower, say 1/15 at 28mm and make very large prints. With ISO 2500 (very doable on 5D2) at f/4, you are into yak fat lamp light, if the lamp is a couple of feet from the person's face.

Bring a lightweight compact flash, like a Canon 90EX (1.8 ounces, under $150) or a 270EX (5.7 oz, under $160) and some orange coloured gels for the flash about the same colour temperature as yak fat lamps.



Jan 16, 2013 at 09:53 PM
Jeff Nolten
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #6 · p.2 #6 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Thanks Monito. I look forward to fermented horse milk Actually I'm an ex-field biologist so I'll eat just about anything

Lots of ideas to think about. I have a 50 f1.8 but I tend to prefer the 35 f2 for most similar uses. I'm not so good at buying and selling, for example I have two 70-200 f4s and two 100 macros that I need to sell the non-IS versions of. I like using two bodies when weight and circumstances allow, I have 5D2 and 7D for wide and long. I'm thinking of getting the 5D3 to replace one or the other of those and be both for single body trips (with f8 & 1.4x). A 270 EX is already part of my kit. I'll look into some orange gels. You know, I'm going to be really disappointed now if I don't get to take some pictures by yak fat lamp light.

I've been out playing with my 17-40 and my walking stick/monopod to see if I need IS. I'll play with the two small primes as well.

I really like my G1X, its as good as any Rebel (IQ) and makes a versatile 2nd body. I'll be using it with an UW housing on the included rafting trip. My wife usually appropriates it during these trips although she packs an Elph and lets me pack the G1X. Go figure.

Thanks everyone for helping me think this through.



Jan 17, 2013 at 12:45 AM
Paul Mo
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #7 · p.2 #7 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Have fun and don't let the gear get in the way of enjoying yourself!


Jan 17, 2013 at 01:50 AM
Jeff Nolten
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #8 · p.2 #8 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


It's fun to agonize over this now. When I get on the trip I'll be in a different world, use what I have and come home with great images I can enjoy the rest of my life! Thanks 'aita pe'ape'a (no worries)


Jan 17, 2013 at 02:40 AM
AGeoJO
Online
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #9 · p.2 #9 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


I was in Bhutan and Nepal in 2010. I had my 5D Mark II and 3 lenses, the 24-105mm, 50mm f/1.2 and 70-200mm f/2.8 II. The most used lens, by a fairly wide margin, was the 24-105mm, followed by the 70-200mm. I didn't feel the weight was a burden and I am in the 60's... . Nobody at the airport, both ticketing agent and security officers going into and out of both countries, say anything about the gear I carried.

On a side note, you will be frisked individually as a part of the security procedures inside a small room at the terminal at all airports in both countries. Ladies and gents are separated, of course .



Jan 17, 2013 at 03:18 AM
ZWhitford
Offline

Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #10 · p.2 #10 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Went to Bhutan last year. You will really enjoy it.


Jan 17, 2013 at 06:09 AM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



Ulan
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #11 · p.2 #11 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


I've been twice to Nepal. So many things to see and photographs to capture : street photography in Katmandu and other valley cities, buddist and Newar architecture, people, festivities and events, magic himalayan landscapes. I agree 24-105 mm is an ideal zoom to couple on a FF frame camera, either for trekking, either for city visit. Some would like to add a 16-35 mm range zoom to take pictures of beautiful mountains while on trekking (like Annapurna Base Camp or the Khumbu valley). But a 70-200 mm, even f/4, can be nice for people, architectural details or landscape photography. Some need a longer focal length for animal watching in Chitwan national park. Of course, the complete gear is heavy and, on trekking, the lighter the better, especially above 3000 m. But many trekkers do it, some of them older than 60 !

Enjoy your trip. Nepal is a beautiful country and a paradise for photographers.



Jan 17, 2013 at 07:46 AM
hardlyboring
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #12 · p.2 #12 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Ok so I went back and re-read your OP and put some thought into your kit.
I cannot speak to Bhutan having never been there but I can speak to pretty much all of Nepal having been to Kathmandu, Lukla, Jiri to Everest Base camp and everywhere in between, Pokhara, and Chitwan National Park.

1st and foremost the electrical situation is dodgy at best. There are rolling outages in Kathmandu and I would plan on being without power for at least 12 hours a day. If you are staying in Thamel the tourist ghetto they will have power during "prime time" aka the afternoon and evening. The power supplies are decent in the nicer hotels but I would beware of bare wires, shorts, and just about every electrical nightmare you can imagine.

I am not sure if you are trekking but power along the way is decent (by decent I mean you can find someone with it). The only benefit of having the larger DSLRs is that the batteries last WAY longer than the smaller cameras we took.

Trekking: Hopefully you have a porter(s) to help carry your stuff and a good guide if you are going to trek. Carry as little as possible. I am not sure of your travelling or trekking experience but it is hard. You will have so many other things to worry about, that the camera situation (and weight) will be way down on the list. You will no doubt see thousands of people with huge cameras and if you are like us and take the small ones with go "damn that is a lot of extra weight to carry around!)... if you here a Sherpa call you a "bonduki" you know you have to much camera stuff!
In the case of trekking I would ONLY take the 5d3 and 24-105. For 99% of the trip that is all you will need unless you are a bokeh feign and need a faster lens. I might also take a small fast prime because you will encounter many situations inside where you will want to take shots and f4 is not going to cut it.

Not sure who you are flying with but if you have a knowledgable guide (you said you booked through a service) they will help you get anything anywhere no matter how much it weighs.
Remember this as well. If you are staying high in the Khumbu or anywhere above 14,000ft it is going to be hella cold no matter when you are there. We almost always had to sleep with all of our electronic stuff in our sleeping bags because we would have ruined the LCD screens and batteries leaving them out in the sub zero temps. My wife literally hugged her Mac Book Air at night so it did not freeze and I ruined a few batteries by leaving them out.

You will most likely always have a small backpack with you at all times with your day gear in it. Jacket, pants, extra layers, hat, gloves, something to cover your face, medicine, sunscreen, water, etc. This does not leave a lot of extra room for camera stuff. It was nice to be able to throw the X100 over my neck and put an extra battery in the pocket and be done with it.

Dust: It is everywhere and it will COAT your stuff. I do not mean that as a joke. You will literally get coated in dust and pollution. The pollution is not as bad as Beijing but it is serious stuff.
#1 thing I can tell you is to get something to cover your face and use it 247. Also make sure you get Tinadazole as soon as you get there. That is the medicine for giardia. Giardia is airborne there because of the dust and even a single drop of unfiltered or unbottled water and you will have serious problems. Even the most in the shower is bad. Most of us developed a technique whereas we were not in direct contact with any water mist. My wife and I were in Nepal for the better part of 3 months and we both got Giardia quite bad a number of times. The Tinadazole will help but it is good to familiarize yourself with the Wilderness Guide to Medicine handbook before you go so you can pick out symptoms of different things you may catch.

Drink drink drink... water that is. It will be dry and if you are going up in the mountains the #1 problem people have is AMS. Nothing ruins a trip like Acute Mountain Sickness.

Extra memory cards. Take them.

Do not trust any of the camera shops you see in Thamel or anywhere for that matter. Fake stuff, 2nd hand garbage, and scams. The only thing they are good for sometimes is getting a passport picture.

PM for more info.



Jan 17, 2013 at 07:55 AM
Jeff Nolten
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #13 · p.2 #13 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Thank you HardlyBoring for the detailed advice. Good things to think about when preparing for a trip. Fortunately or unfortunately we won't be doing nearly as adventurous a trip as you did. We will only be day hiking and not doing any overnights in tents and sleeping bags. I don't think we'll be doing much above 10,000 feet. I'm an experienced backpacker and have always carried just a G series camera. Like you I'm one of the ones usually posting about keeping your pack weight down to enjoy your trip.

It sounds like the consensus is back to the 24-105 as my base lens. I've been traveling with a 5D 24-105 since 2006 so this is natural and comfortable for me. What I'd appreciate advice on is how useful focal lengths wider than 24 or longer than 200 might be. We will be visiting Chitwan but I'm not sure that justifies the 100-400. I can easily meet the carry-on restrictions without that lens. I'll also bring my 35 f2 and 1.4x but I can probably check those for the flights on small planes - or pocket them. Thanks for the info everyone.



Jan 17, 2013 at 04:40 PM
Xavier Rival
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #14 · p.2 #14 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Jeff Nolten wrote:
Thanks Xavier, this is the kind of experience I'm hoping to hear. I've done in-country air in Costa Rica and Tahiti with ridiculous weight limits and found they didn't check if you were reasonable but I've never been to this part of the world.

The iPad contains my reading material and previous trip photography to share with fellow travelers. I always laughed at those who rushed to the hotel hot spots, I travel to get away from that.

Maybe a 70-200 f4 instead of the 100-400 if there is no wildlife to expect. I'd appreciate input on that. We won't
...Show more

Sorry it took me that long to reply, just no time left in the last few days.

Ok, the iPad makes more sense then. Indeed it is good to share pictures.

I think the idea to bring a 70-200/4 instead of the 100-400 is just great. I do use the 70-200/4 quite a lot whenever I am in Nepal, as it makes great mid-tele landscape shots, works perfectly for the occasional portrait, and does not weight much. I would recommend to take wildlife photography equipment on a trip to Nepal only to someone who knows very precisely what they are going after. There are some parks in the south with some wildlife (I never went there so no first hand experience), and the wildlife equipment would be useful there of course. But other than that, I do not think serious wildlife photography opportunities will just show up on a hike not dedicated to that.

What focal length to bring beyond a 24-105 depends a lot on your style of photography. I could not do with just that lens on a Nepal trip and be really happy with my style of photography. I use the wide angle a lot, as there are a lot of very scenic places, both for landscapes but also in cities. I cannot really post tonight (no time, sorry), but I do have a few 17mm pics in Kathmandu that I like a lot. In the tele side, I do a lot of mid-tele landscapes (this works well at all altitudes in my experience), details in buildings in the cities, and portraitures / street photography everywhere. This is why, on my last trips, I did put the 17-40 and the 70-200 in the bag before I consider the 24-105.

Enjoy your trip!



Jan 17, 2013 at 08:18 PM
Jeff Nolten
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #15 · p.2 #15 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


It occurs to me that I have a friend who has a 20-35 f2.8 L that she would probably loan me for the trip. That would solve both the fast and wide at the expense of a bit more weight as a supplement to the 24-105.

Thanks Xavier and everyone for the suggestions. I feel much more confident about gear selection and carrying it on the plane Not that I won't do more reading between now and departure. We don't leave for a couple of months but we have to make final payment (gulp!) next week. Cheers.



Jan 18, 2013 at 01:36 AM
dmcharg
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #16 · p.2 #16 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


2 bodies, 2 lens is a cracking setup.

5D2 + 24-105
7D + 70-200f4IS

Minimal fuss and maximum flexibility. Lets you focus on enjoying your trip and also not having to change lens etc all the time. Take G1X for when you don't want to carry a DSLR.

David.



Jan 18, 2013 at 12:52 PM
Jeff Nolten
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #17 · p.2 #17 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


dmcharg wrote:
2 bodies, 2 lens is a cracking setup.


Thanks David. Ideally I agree with you 100%. My favorite setup is 5D+24-105 and 7D+100-400. On a recent Costa Rica trip I took this plus a 100L for frogs and butterflies. Airport shlepping was entirely manageable and I could leave unused camera/lenses in the room safe.

This trip is more uncertain with much more hiking and I may have to have all my gear with me all the time. Wildlife will not be a major focus but wide vistas, low light, and architecture will so I'm thinking of replacing 7D, 100-400, 100L with 70-200, 1.4x, and 20-35 f2.8. Fortunately, my wife will have the G1X to supplement as a normal zoom, backup/alternative. This is my thought process for this trip. <8 lbs carry-on camera gear. What do you think?



Jan 18, 2013 at 06:20 PM
Paul Mo
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #18 · p.2 #18 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Jeff Nolten wrote:
It occurs to me that I have a friend who has a 20-35 f2.8 L that she would probably loan me for the trip. Cheers.


I'm really enjoying my recently purchased 20-35 f2.8L a lot. I haven't had it long enough to get any 'real' shots but it's promising.



Jan 18, 2013 at 08:12 PM
dmcharg
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #19 · p.2 #19 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Hi Jeff, if your going to be doing a LOT of hiking then the G1X would be my first choice. I have done a lot of hiking myself and for sure the less kit you have to carry the better but everyone is different. A few years ago i spent 6 months travelling all over the US including extensive hiking/walking in the national parks i.e Yosemite, Yellowstone, Grand Canyon etc. Prior to the trip i wasn't sure about whether to take a DSLR etc and in the end i opted to take Canon G11 and a small pair of binoculars. Turned out to be an excellent combination. A lot depends on how extensive your walking/hiking is, i hiked to the the top of half dome in Yosemite and i was glad i wasn't carrying a DSLR i can assure you. If the main purpose of your trip is photography by all means take DSLR & lens but if you just want to get some nice shots from your hikes then the G1X will certainly give you that in a much smaller/lighter package.


Jan 18, 2013 at 08:16 PM
jonorees
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #20 · p.2 #20 · Nepal and Bhutan equipment question


Jeff, stoked that you started this. Heading to India, Kathman and Lhasa in October this year and had been thinking about gear options.

Have a slightly different kit (and no assistant) 5d3, tokina 16-28, 50 1.2, 70-200 2.8 is, 100-400 and the 50 1.2.

Along with the tripod I was thinking of taking the Tokina, and the 100-400 and picking up the 40 2.8 to cover the middle ground. While I love the 50, the 40 without the grip I feel would turn it into a oversize compact.

I mainly take landscapes and had considered also picking up the Samyang 24 tilt shift in March.

Will probably head to Chitwan and Rathambore which is why I'm thinking the 100-400 over the 70-200.

I would really think about the 24-105. I had one up until 6 months ago and it does give great flexibility but how often do you use each length? There is a plugin for Lightroom I use about 6 months ago which analysed lengths of my photos. Something like 87% were at 24 and 8% were between 40-65.

So I'd think about the 17-40 either tho 100-400 or the 70-200 and a 50. I think the ISO on the 5d3 will compensate for the IS of the 35.



Jan 18, 2013 at 11:14 PM
1      
2
       3       end




FM Forums | Canon Forum | Join Upload & Sell

1      
2
       3       end
    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Reset password