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Archive 2013 · D610 replacing the D600
  
 
seaum
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p.3 #1 · p.3 #1 · D610 replacing the D600


Rodolfo Paiz wrote:
Maybe, maybe not. It could be that 99% of the D600 bodies are depositing oily spots on the sensor array, but it could also be that only 1% are doing it... that'd still be enough to generate some volume of complaints. It's probably not 1% if someone can get three cameras that do it, but it's still an unknown.

All we know is that some people are complaining about the issue and that the issue is real -- though we don't yet know if it's a break-in issue that goes away or whether it's a constant. But we don't know
...Show more

Exactly! We and several other members of several other forums would not even be discussing this if Nikon simply provided us with the relevant information.



Jan 30, 2013 at 09:30 PM
ckcarr
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p.3 #2 · p.3 #2 · D610 replacing the D600


Note that I said "A 1%er compared to what I read here."
Who knows the real number. I bet it's somewhere between 1% and 99% though!



Jan 31, 2013 at 02:32 AM
JTMeuret
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p.3 #3 · p.3 #3 · D610 replacing the D600


Wow. Wondering why anyone would even purchase a D600 if you know of "oil" spots as a major problem. I know a good way to get Nikon to either fix and/or admit the issue... ----> Stop buying D600's, folks! But, unfortunately people will keep buying them in the meantime, mostly because they haven't read reviews or forums like this. So, the problem will continue on. If you want to wet clean more often than normal, go for it. Buy one! Sure you can get great shots, but why would you want to clean the sensor constantly. I use a rocket blower more often than wet cleaning. But oil spots? What the hell! Stop buying D600's!!!! Hello!!!


Jan 31, 2013 at 04:24 AM
williamkazak
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p.3 #4 · p.3 #4 · D610 replacing the D600


Agree with the above, JT. I am currently with a pair of D300 bodies that have never needed a wet cleaning. It would be foolish for me to get a D600. I am not getting one. Nikon is suspect to me all across the board now with the "service" horror stories. I have been shooting B&W film for two months with a Nikon F100. Someone once wondered why DSLR's are so expensive when you can get a nice film body for $200. Good question.


Feb 02, 2013 at 03:34 AM
ckcarr
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p.3 #5 · p.3 #5 · D610 replacing the D600


williamkazak wrote:
I have been shooting B&W film for two months with a Nikon F100. Someone once wondered why DSLR's are so expensive when you can get a nice film body for $200. Good question.


Shooting only black & white is a false argument. To compare apples to apples you need to price quality color slide film. Because even the most rudimentary digital camera can produce nice color images. However, the economic argument no longer exists for film over digital.

Color film photography is more, possibly far more expensive than shooting digital depending on how often you shoot. If you were to shoot and develop two rolls of 36 exposure Velvia color slide film per week, 52 weeks per year (only 72 shots per week) it would cost the following:

Fujifilm RVP 135-36 Fujichrome Velvia 50 Professional Color Slide (Transparency) Film (ISO-50 $8.59 per roll x 2 rolls x 52 weeks = $893.36

Development @ $6.20 per roll x 2 rolls x 52 weeks = $644 (a price I found).

Total $1,538 for film and developing alone, or $ .41 per shot based on 3,744 shots. Of course you still have to scan, or digitize somehow, which is a further expense, or piece of equipment you buy.

You still have to buy lenses, tripods, lighting, travel, etc. regardless of which path you take, which is the real cost in photography. See Thom Hogans, "Tip of the Iceberg" article, it put's it in perspective.

There are plenty of people on this forum that are shooting 100 shots per day or more, several days per week. Just look at Nature & Wildlife. Now start computing that out. In my case, I shoot a minimum of 100 shots each time I'm out doing landscape. At least three days per week. 300 shots per week x 52 x $ .41 = $6,396 per year for film and development.

Nice digital bodies and memory cards aren't that expensive anymore. Not everyone can afford the latest, greatest, D4, D800e, D800, D600, etc. but there's plenty of new or pre-owned bodies available for under that (minimal) $1,538 annual expense. And you're buying an asset with (hopefully) a 3-5 year useful life, not paying a recurring expense (true, the asset depreciates but always has some residual value). Buy a D7000 used, a memory card or two, and you're good to go for $700 to $750 .... Or, apply that $1,538 per year for a couple years and get a D800 or D4 on a payment plan. Digital is one of the greatest bargains out there now, and a huge enabler for budding photographers to shoot and learn without going broke.

I had always been slightly curious about the math and this question forced me to do a very quick computation since I think of getting a film body once in a while, but the economics are just not there.




Feb 02, 2013 at 04:42 AM
 

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seaum
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p.3 #6 · p.3 #6 · D610 replacing the D600


Interesting position by the Chinese government on the faulty D600:


The Nikon D600 had a rocky introduction in 2012, with countless users noting that the camera often produces images with dust/oil spots. The company released the D610 a year later that is virtually identical to the D600, but with this issue seemingly corrected.

Nowhere though is the D600 having as rough a time as China, were the government has issued an order to Nikon to stop selling the D600 entirely following an investigative report on CCT (China Central Television) that captured dealers trying to avoid refunding money to angry customers.

The program, which aired March 15th to correspond with World Consumer Rights Day, showed customers complaining about the image quality from the D600 and dealers attempting to blame dust and smog — despite Nikon's acknowledgement of the issues as being part of the camera’s construction.

Nikon had already stopped directly selling the D600 but now will be forced to recall them from dealers in China. This step comes after the company announced in February that it would offer D600 users free inspection, cleaning and replacement of the shutter assembly, even if the warranty has expired.

Source: Bloomberg News


www.dpreview.com/news/2014/03/18/chinese-government-orders-nikon-to-stop-selling-d600




Apr 15, 2014 at 06:31 PM
MDoc9523
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p.3 #7 · p.3 #7 · D610 replacing the D600


I bought my D600 as a refurb from Adorama a year ago. Even though it did not have an oil problem it did not have the new shutter either. I sent mine in anyway and they adjusted everything, installed a new shutter plus extra parts. It was great before but much better when I got it back. Quieter shutter sound and much more color and clarity. Turn around was three weeks.


Apr 15, 2014 at 07:30 PM
cadman342001
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p.3 #8 · p.3 #8 · D610 replacing the D600


I would personally buy a D610. No reports of problems with them is there ?

The fact that the 610 shutter won't fit in the 600 means they can't replace the shutters in the recalls with the newer design and so are simply replacing the 600 shutters with 600 shutters hence IMO the 'if you're not happy we'll replace it'. Maybe the replacement shutters are a redesign or have different oil/lube but I wouldn't risk it myself.

Andy



Apr 17, 2014 at 12:37 PM
runamuck
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p.3 #9 · p.3 #9 · D610 replacing the D600


Maybe you wouldn't, but many are. The new shutters have (apparently) cleared up the problem. Engineers have figured out the defect and have batches of redesigned shutters with which to replace the defective units.

Reports aare that Nikon repair tests each new shutter by firing off several hundred test shots and checking for any sign of oil splatters. So, they are not only replacing shutters, but also testing new ones after installation.



Apr 18, 2014 at 03:34 AM
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