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Archive 2013 · Shooting in hot and humid conditions?
  
 
win2kpro
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Shooting in hot and humid conditions?


While on holiday I've been having some issues with my 400D and the kit lens 18-55mm IS, When leaving the car which is air conditioned and getting the camera to shoot on location I notice fog/mist builds up on the lens/sensor?

Wiping the lens does not help much as it will come back again.

What do you guys do in such a situation? Should I worry about the lens/body? Will a better lens handle hot and humidity like any L lens or a better body like 5D with a better sealing?



Jan 08, 2013 at 10:13 PM
jcolwell
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Shooting in hot and humid conditions?


win2kpro wrote:
... Will a better lens handle hot and humidity like any L lens or a better body like 5D with a better sealing?


Nope, at least not on the outside. It's a matter of the humidity in the warm air condensing on the cold camera and lens body. You can put the camera/lens in a plastic bag while you're in the AC, and this will prevent condensation from getting on the gear when you take it outside. You'll have to keep the gear inside the bag until it's warmed up to almost the ambient temperature before taking it out of the bag, or it'll condense. This is the same but different as shooting outside in cold weather, and then bringing the gear into a warm and (relatively) humid building.

I once had a 5D condense on the inside. I had swapped lenses in warm air, near a waterfall where it was really humid (Calf Creek Falls UT). A thunder storm rolled in as we walked out, with a sharp drop in temperature. Now that was a pain!



Jan 08, 2013 at 10:20 PM
Photon
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Shooting in hot and humid conditions?


Half the year here is hot and humid. Sometimes when shooting a wedding I'll come out of an air conditioned venue to do outside shots and find the lens fogging up. Actually, the first sign is usually the viewfinder eyepiece fogging, unless I'm really careful not to breath on it. When the lens fogs, wiping with a microfiber cloth will usually keep it dry for a few shots. Then I have to repeat a few times until the temp of the lens gets closer to ambient.

If you do any lens changes before you leave your air conditioned car, there shouldn't be excess humidity to condense on the sensor. You might look for a less frigid area of the car to keep your camera bag while you travel on hot days...



Jan 09, 2013 at 03:13 AM
BrianO
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Shooting in hot and humid conditions?


win2kpro wrote:
...Will a better lens handle hot and humidity like any L lens or a better body like 5D with a better sealing?


If the condensation is on the sensor, or inside the lens, then a better-sealed piece might help...or it might not. As others mentioned, taking a cold camera into a moist environment is problematic. Keeping the camera in the boot instead of in the passenger compartment can help.

(Don't keep it in the boot when the car is parked in the sun for long periods, as it can get too hot.)

I used to live in Florida, but moved to the Pacific Northwest many years ago. The last time I visited Florida during the summer I couldn't even sleep without the A/C in my hotel room going full blast. On my first morning there, I stepped out of my room and my (cold) glasses instantly fogged over, and I had to take them off until they warmed up a bit. I could see better without them than with them when they were foggy. The next morning I ran them under hot water for a few moments just before I went outside, and no more problems.

I don't suggest running your camera under hot water, but the principle is the same: if the camera and lens are as warm as or warmer than the surrounding air you won't get condensation.



Jan 09, 2013 at 07:29 AM
 

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Gochugogi
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Shooting in hot and humid conditions?


I live in Honolulu where it is 80 plus degrees and 80 plus relative humidity everyday. Condensation happens to nekid cameras and sunglasses when you exit an AC room or car. The easiest way around this situation is to keep you camera in a zipped camera bag while riding in the car. When you step outside, pull the camera out and it should be fine since it was insulated from the AC. I actually deal with this situation everyday. My sun glasses fog up as soon as I exit the car but the camera is fine.


Jan 09, 2013 at 08:20 AM
Stoffer
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Shooting in hot and humid conditions?


I was told a trick by a guy that shoots in the cold that might help: When youíre still in the cold area, put the camera and lens in a big plastic bag with some air around it, then close it. Bring it to the warm area, and the condensation should manifest on the plastic, not the camera or lens.

I havenít tried it myself, but it makes sense. It is a bit evolving, but if you have the time, it could help you out.



Jan 09, 2013 at 08:26 AM
TheObiJuan
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Shooting in hot and humid conditions?


I'm a Navy photographer on an aircraft carrier. Our equipment is kept inside the ship in my shop at 70*, the flight deck exceeds 100* and the humidity through the roof when we're around the equator.

I found leaving the camera and lenses in a bag help, but so can leaving them in a zipped up camera bag in a warmer room or enclosure.

Your trunk while driving is a great example.

I just left Hawaii and my bag and gear were in the trunk when not shooting to keep them nicely acclimated.



Jan 19, 2013 at 10:42 AM
jason.alabama
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Shooting in hot and humid conditions?


This is the same problem when shooting outside in snowy weather, and then returning to a warmer home. Or it could be your basement pipes sweating in the summer, or eyeglasses fogging up from a cool environment when entering a warmer one. The only difference here is that condensation INSIDE your camera is a very bad thing. This could happen anytime the camera body cools to the point that warmer air wants to get all dewy on you. The solution is to keep the air away (i.e. the plastic sealed bag), until the camera warms up enough that the air doesn't want to condense on it (or in it) anymore. There really isn't anything else you can do. If you wear glasses, leave your camera behind and see if the lenses fog up - if not, then you are probably ok.


Jan 29, 2013 at 11:07 PM





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