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Archive 2012 · Exposure compensation dials
  
 
alfarmer
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p.1 #1 · Exposure compensation dials


The Nikon 7700 and Canon G15 sport exposure compensation dials. Is this an increasing trend? Do people use exposure compensation enough to warrant a special dial just for it?

In tricky lighting situations (such as moving clouds on a sunny day), I've always found it much more efficient to use AE-Lock or switch to Manual exposure mode using image review as a light meter. Either of those options allows for much more dynamic control when you need to change settings swiftly.

Exposure compensation assumes a lighting consistency that I just don't usually get outside of a studio, and if you're in a studio you shouldn't need compensation?

IMHO if they're going to put a special-purpose dial on a camera, an ISO dial would be more useful to a broader base of users. But since manufacturers are adding exposure compensation dials, it makes me wonder if I'm missing out on some technique involving their use?



Nov 24, 2012 at 11:15 PM
jcolwell
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p.1 #2 · Exposure compensation dials


My Fujifilm X100 and X-Pro 1 have dedicated exposure compensation dials. They're well positioned for making EV adjustments without removing my eye from the finder. Similar to my Canon bodies, but on the top right corner, instead of on the back. I use them all the time. Love them!


Nov 24, 2012 at 11:21 PM
EB-1
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p.1 #3 · Exposure compensation dials


On an SLR I always use the rear dial for exposure compensation in auto exposure modes. It allows quick access without removing your eye from the viewfinder. IIRC it has been that way since the 90s for good reason. I suppose the P/S cameras are just catching on.

Every camera should have two dials for quick access to critical settings. Several combinations such as aperture/shutter speed, aperture/exp. comp., shutter speed/exp. comp., program shift/exp. comp., ISO shift/exp. comp., etc. should be available. If I had my way a camera would have three control dials - one on the rear and two on the front at right angles. That would provide more options without pushing buttons.

EBH



Nov 24, 2012 at 11:32 PM
15Bit
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p.1 #4 · Exposure compensation dials


My Fuji X10 has one too, and i do use it.


Nov 25, 2012 at 08:32 AM
 

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alfarmer
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p.1 #5 · Exposure compensation dials


Would you mind explaining under what circumstances you use exposure compensation instead of just manually setting the exposure or using AE-Lock, as well as why that's a better choice for you?

Just trying to determine if I'm missing out on some sort of technique I should be using or if it's just a matter of personal preference.

Thanks,
ALF



Nov 25, 2012 at 05:53 PM
Kenneth Farver
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p.1 #6 · Exposure compensation dials


one example is aiming the camera at something white, you just dial up another stop or more of exposure while the camera is still to your eye.


Nov 25, 2012 at 06:03 PM
EB-1
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p.1 #7 · Exposure compensation dials


alfarmer wrote:
Would you mind explaining under what circumstances you use exposure compensation instead of just manually setting the exposure or using AE-Lock, as well as why that's a better choice for you?

Just trying to determine if I'm missing out on some sort of technique I should be using or if it's just a matter of personal preference.

Thanks,
ALF


It's a matter of working fast and keeping your eye on the prize. AE-lock is not so great for example when you are photographing a moving target in servo mode, changing the AF point, and meanwhile light is changing. You know the reflectance of the primary subject and compensate exposure accordingly, taking into account various factors learned through experience. As good as the auto multipattern metering is these days, it is not a substitute for the human eyes and brain. Obviously when shooting landscapes for example, one can stare at the histogram and make various adjustments relatively leisurely. Seeing light and understand metering is one of the hardest parts about photography for many people. It sure has changed significantly from film, but the general principles are the same.

EBH



Nov 25, 2012 at 06:35 PM
Todd Warnke
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p.1 #8 · Exposure compensation dials


Shooting aperture priority at sunset and wanting a subdued image, not an 18% grey exposure. Dial in -1 stop exposure w/o moving eye from viewfinder nor having to change the composition to find a brighter part of the image for exposure lock. Since I shoot a lot of sunrises, sunsets and in snow, exposure compensation is an essential tool.

Peace,

Todd



Nov 25, 2012 at 08:24 PM





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