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Archive 2012 · Newbie question: Lens reversing, extension tubes, and sta...
  
 
cmcfalls
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p.1 #1 · Newbie question: Lens reversing, extension tubes, and stacking


Greetings macro gurus!

I am thinking about getting into more macro photography. I am a VERY green beginner in this area and was thinking about trying some of the "tricks" for macro photography to see how I am going to like it before dropping the cash on a new lens.

I've read a bit about lens reversing, extension tubes, and stacking, all of which seem to be different means to the same end. But I cannot find any sort of decent comparison between the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

I may have paralysis by analysis, something that happens with me a great deal, but I can't seem to decide on a method. Considering all of them are cheap, I am considering just getting a reversal ring, a few extension tubes, and a stacking adapter and trying them all out to see what I like best.

But, those of you who are more knowledgeable on the macro subject, care to weigh in? I won't ask which method is better, because I know that is subjective. But what are the advantages and disadvantages? What will give me the best magnification while maintaining image quality and sharpness?



Nov 15, 2012 at 03:07 PM
LordV
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p.1 #2 · Newbie question: Lens reversing, extension tubes, and stacking


Optically reversing a lens onto the camera body or reversing a lens onto another lens (or adding a diopter) or using extension tubes, can all give good magnification and IQ.
The main point is ease of use. Here using either auto extension tubes or reversing a small lens onto a larger lens (or adding a diopter) score well because you can maintain control of the aperture. Reversing a lens onto the camera body looses direct aperture control.
To see what may be good value to you we need to know what lenses you already have.
Brian v.



Nov 15, 2012 at 03:50 PM
Tom Hicks
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p.1 #3 · Newbie question: Lens reversing, extension tubes, and stacking


http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/663112
http://www.shutterfreaks.com/Tips/tomhicksmacros.html
http://www.shutterfreaks.com/Tips/tomhicksSeeingPhotographs.html
http://www.shutterfreaks.com/Tips/tomhicksBasicComposition.html



Nov 15, 2012 at 11:45 PM
 

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e6filmuser
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p.1 #4 · Newbie question: Lens reversing, extension tubes, and stacking


A major consideration is diaphragm control with the reversed lens. Some mounts e.g. Nikon A keep the detached lens with the aperture you select. Others, such as Olympus OM maintain maximum aperture.

Some lenses woek as well reversed, other are no nearly so good when turned around.

I have been playing with this recently:

http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?p=117843#117843

http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=18452

http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=18455

Harold



Nov 16, 2012 at 09:10 AM
kwoodard
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p.1 #5 · Newbie question: Lens reversing, extension tubes, and stacking


If you get a lens with a manual aperture ring, you don't have to worry about that when reversing a lens.


Nov 18, 2012 at 02:48 AM
e6filmuser
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p.1 #6 · Newbie question: Lens reversing, extension tubes, and stacking


kwoodard wrote:
If you get a lens with a manual aperture ring, you don't have to worry about that when reversing a lens.

I am refering to lenses with manual aperture rings and I use them all the time.

You can modify a lens, where the detached lens does not allow the diaphragm to remain closed down, for reversed operation e.g.:

http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=18243

Or, as mentioned in the linked topic, get the same effect by fitting it with an adapter e.g. with an OM lens, the widely-available OM to 4/3 adapters, which can be used, irrespective of the system for your camera or its sensor size, .

Both of these techniques can be used for reveresed lenses on film cameras too.

Harold



Nov 18, 2012 at 07:55 AM





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