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Archive 2012 · The door and window problem
  
 
RustyBug
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p.3 #1 · The door and window problem


Ben ... I don't think construction metal workers use a micrometer too often either. Conversely, I use vernier calipers to cut my wood pieces down to .001" tolerance when I make intricate cutting board designs. Craftsmanship has a degree of relativity involved to both the tools available and the need for the precision. Besides "5 little marks" (1/16, 1/32, 1/64 depending on measuring device) can be pretty darn precise when you realize that wood moves with atmospheric changes.

Seeing a Boy Scout build a lean-to with only his knife available to him requires a different level of appreciation than marveling over the grandeur of the Taj Mahal, or taking four days aligning a motor to .0001" that no one will ever visually detect.



Oct 19, 2012 at 04:55 PM
ben egbert
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p.3 #2 · The door and window problem


I appreciate high tolerance woodwork, I just have not seen it applied to many doors. I once saw a Porch Engine all in wood at a gallery at Newport OR. a thing of beauty.

I also appreciate well done hand carved wood and well done furniture or musical instruments. Wood can be beautiful if done by a craftsman.

Almost anything used in home construction be it metal or plastic or wood is shoddy to my way of thinking.

Sadja was right, that shed was never high quality, its just old.

I do admire the log construction barns in the Tetons. Not micrometer precision, but well fitted anyway.



Oct 19, 2012 at 05:12 PM
sadja
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p.3 #3 · The door and window problem


Hi Ben, I know you have a thing about color and it shows in your attempts at B&W. However, since no digital capture can possibly recapture the event as you saw it I would say abandon that as a goal. Instead work with the compromises that are intrinsic to photography: recangular or square clip of the scene, color bias imposed by the medium (in film days these were the chemistry of the film), monocular vision. etc, etc. etc...

Among the 1st limitations accepted by photographers was B&W because there was no color chemistry. A number of photogs of the era peformed magic within this restriction. Most viewers recognize those achievements. It is your shortcoming that you cannot.



Oct 19, 2012 at 06:28 PM
ben egbert
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p.3 #4 · The door and window problem


sadja wrote:
Hi Ben, I know you have a thing about color and it shows in your attempts at B&W. However, since no digital capture can possibly recapture the event as you saw it I would say abandon that as a goal. Instead work with the compromises that are intrinsic to photography: recangular or square clip of the scene, color bias imposed by the medium (in film days these were the chemistry of the film), monocular vision. etc, etc. etc...

Among the 1st limitations accepted by photographers was B&W because there was no color chemistry. A number of photogs of the era peformed
...Show more


If I had an original print of Moonlight Hacienda, I would just sell it. I really appreciate the craftsmanship, but it would not displace one of my very inferior landscapes.

I understand that B&W has a lot more tonal gradations available, but I never see it, just something I have read someplace I guess. Color is never accurate, but at least there is something red where I saw red in person. Skys are blue not black.




Oct 19, 2012 at 07:03 PM
RustyBug
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p.3 #5 · The door and window problem


I can appreciate Ben's bent toward color.

I used to have a similar viewpoint @ B&W ... I heard & read about it. I tried to add it to my arsenal via taking B&W class, but it didn't do squat for me. I was a FujiChrome guy (VPS for weddings). Today, is a different day and my tonal value appreciation is very different from before, but I can still understand Ben's current perspective. That may change in the future ... but then again, he just may be a color guy forever.



Oct 19, 2012 at 08:44 PM
 

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ben egbert
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p.3 #6 · The door and window problem


Hi Kent:

I tried B&W 7-8 years ago, even entered some prints in CC. But they got pretty badly mauled for tonal range. I watched various judges critique B&W and I could never guess in advance which ones would win. Never the ones I prefered.

But as I get older and my eyes get dimmer, color is one part of seeing I can't afford to give up.

Last year I had a blown vessel in my left (best) eye and got it stitched in the nick of time to avoid losing vision in that eye. Still see floaters. I just don't want to give up any part of vision.




Oct 19, 2012 at 08:51 PM
HiredGoon
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p.3 #7 · The door and window problem


ben egbert wrote:
So when I decided to try my hand at pointless art or whatever this is called, I knew the old building that I walk by in the evening would need my attention. I see photographers here frequently using it as a background for family pictures.


I can't offer a critique on shooting doors, but I'm curious about this old building that you mention. I lived in that area and I wasn't aware that there was a popular place for photographic backdrops. Where is it?

(unless you mean the old gas station, or perhaps the property on E 1100 N, perhaps)



Oct 23, 2012 at 09:28 AM
ben egbert
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p.3 #8 · The door and window problem


Its right across the street from the Jack and Jill bowling alley on 700 and Bamburger. Right by my house. Its actually a tin roof shed. I don't consider it photogenic at all. I love old barns, but if they have tin on the roof, forget it. This one also has modern siding on one side.

You might be interested in this Wasatch Front write up. Have you ever been to the end of Squaw Peak road? Great view of Timp from there but I was too late for the color.

http://ben-egbert-photo.com/?page_id=960



Oct 23, 2012 at 02:50 PM
HiredGoon
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p.3 #9 · The door and window problem


ben egbert wrote:
You might be interested in this Wasatch Front write up. Have you ever been to the end of Squaw Peak road? Great view of Timp from there but I was too late for the color.


Squaw Peak Rd got too rough for my wee car. I turned around about where the trail from Rock Canyon meets the road. Looks great, though.



Oct 26, 2012 at 11:46 AM
ben egbert
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p.3 #10 · The door and window problem


Yep, this was a pickup truck drive.


Oct 26, 2012 at 02:51 PM
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