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Archive 2012 · Teton's Print
  
 
Grantland
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Teton's Print


hi,

i was able to spend a couple days in Jackson last week and wanted to make a print of the Tetons for my personal use.

My 2 question on the print below:

1. Do I go with "The Grand Tetons" or just "Grand Tetons"

2. Do i use texture around the Teton's picture or just plain white?

thanks,

grant







Oct 09, 2012 at 01:14 PM
killersnowman
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Teton's Print


are you going to print those mattes? why not get it matted for real? or is this just a mock up?


Oct 09, 2012 at 01:33 PM
ckcarr
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Teton's Print


Polar White mat board.

No words at all.




Oct 09, 2012 at 01:34 PM
Grantland
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Teton's Print


killersnowman wrote:
are you going to print those mattes? why not get it matted for real? or is this just a mock up?


good questions.

the matte is just from FM i should have left it off.

i think i will get it matted for real.

thanks.








Oct 09, 2012 at 01:39 PM
Grantland
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Teton's Print


ckcarr wrote:
Polar White mat board.

No words at all.



okay, so if i take out the words do i center the picture vertically?

thanks



Oct 09, 2012 at 01:40 PM
Ear Mountain
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Teton's Print


Most professional framers leave a little more space on the matte on the bottom than there is on the top and sides.


Oct 09, 2012 at 02:19 PM
Genes Home
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Teton's Print


agree with ckcarr and ear mountain.......no wording needed, use "real" matting, any frame specialist will leave slightly more space at the bottom than at the top/sides.

If you want, add you name in small lettering of an appropriate typeface at the bottom right of the print in a slightly contrasting color.

If you must have a title for the print, I highly recommend a SMALL brass plate inset into the bottom matte that has the title and your name. Talk to your local framer, they probably have some nice examples on hand to show you.

As shown above, the title is far, far too large. It simply overwhelms the print.

Gene



Oct 09, 2012 at 04:33 PM
Grantland
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Teton's Print


thanks for all the help.





Oct 09, 2012 at 08:30 PM
stickshift
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Teton's Print


It's simply just "The Tetons". There is no "Grand" in there. The mountain range is the Teton range. The specific peak is called Grand Teton. There is not more than one Grand Teton.


Oct 10, 2012 at 12:10 AM
 

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JimFox
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Teton's Print


That's a very cool shot you have there. Definitely just white matte, as to the wording, if you like it, go for it. You said it was for personal use, so I see no reason not to use wording.

Jim



Oct 10, 2012 at 12:27 AM
briangg
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Teton's Print


I agree that you should sign your name on the mat in light pencil, just below the lower right corner of the image. Always sign your work.

Brian



Oct 10, 2012 at 12:59 AM
killersnowman
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p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Teton's Print


ckcarr wrote:
Polar White mat board.

No words at all.



i agree with the no words, but i must disagree on using a white mat. when we look at an image our eyes go to the brightest point and strongest contrast first. in the case of a white mat the eye gets hung up on the border between the image and the mat and only leaves under tension. the eye should go straight to the mountains wich are the brightest and strongest part of image

i suggest going to a local framer and just ask them for some ideas as to what would go well with this image. i actually just got a bunch of b/w square prints matted and framed and went with a charcoal/slate mat with a dark beveled frame. they look stunning and showcase the print, not the mat.

go in to the framers with an open mind



Oct 10, 2012 at 01:21 AM
Greg Norrell
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p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · Teton's Print


If you use text, it should be The Tetons, as correctly pointed out by Stickshift above. The Grand is a specific peak (nicely captured btw). Also, Jackson Wy is not in your picture. It was behind you when taking the shot. The valley is commonly called 'Jackson Hole' but Jackson is just the town.


Oct 10, 2012 at 01:54 AM
Grantland
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p.1 #14 · p.1 #14 · Teton's Print


Greg Norrell wrote:
If you use text, it should be The Tetons, as correctly pointed out by Stickshift above. The Grand is a specific peak (nicely captured btw). Also, Jackson Wy is not in your picture. It was behind you when taking the shot. The valley is commonly called 'Jackson Hole' but Jackson is just the town.


thanks!



Oct 10, 2012 at 04:10 AM
gdanmitchell
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p.1 #15 · p.1 #15 · Teton's Print


Quick thoughts...

Don't use the apostrophe (as in the thread title) in Tetons.

As others pointed out, don't include "Grand."

Including that giant text on the image is more in line with producing a poster than a fine art print - is that what you want? If not, simply sign, title, and perhaps number the print in the margin below the image and mount in a window mat that is larger than the image area by .5 to 1 inch so that the signing shows.

Someone was very emphatic about not using a white mat. That is a true outlier notion, since the standard, traditional method of mounting is to use a white mat. There are other options, but most people feel that mats in colors or black are more likely to over power the print itself.

Regarding prints versus online presentation - and not unrelated to the white mat question... prints that look fine on the screen, where the light "glows" though the monitor, can end up looking too dark as prints, where the light comes from "on top of" the print. One way to ensure that you don't get caught in this trap is to work on the screen with a white background. I know that black backgrounds look great, and that some recommend neutral 18% gray, but both of these can trick you into thinking that your image will make a fine print when it is actually too dark. The truth is that much of the work done to prepare a photograph for print is about adding light to the image - working to optimize highlight levels, doing various things with curves, and so forth. You are most likely to end up with a beautiful, light-filled print if you work against a white background on the screen.

If you are not familiar with this stuff, some things to consider:

1. If you go to a frame shop that knows about mounting photographs, they can give you some pointers and ideas that may help. They can also help you with frames. There are all kinds of ideas about frames. Many photographers prefer simply, narrow metal frames that do not overpower the print. I like the black Nielsen metal frames, though the silver version are also a nice alternative.

2. I assume you are sending your print out to a printing service. They may also be able to help you with these decisions.

3. If you have not done so, visit some shows or galleries that include photographs of the sort you do and see what kinds of presentations are used and which appeal to you.

4. Some interesting alternative presentations also are available including canvas printing, mounting directly to metal and plastic materials, and so forth.

5. I would avoid printing anything on the paper other than the print itself in most cases - no printed borders, text, etc. (There are exceptions, but they usually are not for large wall-mounted photographic prints.)

Good luck.

Dan



Oct 10, 2012 at 07:36 PM
PeaktoPeek
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p.1 #16 · p.1 #16 · Teton's Print


I agree with whoever said no to the white matte -- go through the matte samples at the frame shop and pick something like a warm gray. I've also matted in black which really makes bright colors pop. I would also go with no words -- I'm pretty sure everyone knows what mountains those are, plus imo it looks cheesy.


Oct 10, 2012 at 10:48 PM
killersnowman
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p.1 #17 · p.1 #17 · Teton's Print


gdanmitchell wrote:
Someone was very emphatic about not using a white mat. That is a true outlier notion, since the standard, traditional method of mounting is to use a white mat. There are other options, but most people feel that mats in colors or black are more likely to over power the print itself.



not emphatic, i wasnt forcing anyone to do anything, just suggesting that a white mat would overpower an image because the eye is drawn the the brightest points of an image first, which in the case of a white matted image would be the mat.

i highly doubt that most people feel that colors or blacks overpower an image, its more of an issue with the whole gallery display phenomenon where most things are matted white because it is considered a more middle of the road option.

ill take a few snaps of the frame jobs i just had done and ill show you how a darker grey mat can actually get out of the way of an image and showcase the image more than a white mat.


eek.... now i might be getting emphatic whilst defending my choices.

thanks!

-Tyler



Oct 11, 2012 at 01:09 AM
gdanmitchell
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p.1 #18 · p.1 #18 · Teton's Print


Not saying you cannot mat in any color you want, but take a look around at the most typical choice and you'll note that it is white. White is regarded, as you point out, as the most neutral color for mats.

I think that what I wrote, and what you quoted from my post, is a point of view that has wide support.

Take care,

Dan

killersnowman wrote:
not emphatic, i wasnt forcing anyone to do anything, just suggesting that a white mat would overpower an image because the eye is drawn the the brightest points of an image first, which in the case of a white matted image would be the mat.

i highly doubt that most people feel that colors or blacks overpower an image, its more of an issue with the whole gallery display phenomenon where most things are matted white because it is considered a more middle of the road option.

ill take a few snaps of the frame jobs i just had done
...Show more



Oct 11, 2012 at 05:09 AM





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