Home · Register · Search · View Winners · Software · Hosting · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Canon Forum | Join Upload & Sell

  

Archive 2012 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras
  
 
Mikael B
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


Hi,

I'm still in the middle of searching a new camera for myself and had one HDR related that caught my mind.

I think typical way to shoot HDR photos is to shoot photos on tripod so the three images could be combined together and create HDR photo. But, if you have camera that shoots faster framerates (7D, 1D2, 1D3, 1D4, 1DX) is it possible to shoot more easier "handheld HDR" photos?

For example, 1D3 has 10 FPS. If I would choose to shoot a burst of three images (-2,0,+2 EV) couldn't I do the three shots in 0,3 seconds? If shots would be taken with following shutter speeds 1/100, 1/400, 1/1600 wouldn't it be possible to shoot handheld HDR with 1D3? I have tried the method briefly with 1D3 and I think it worked quite well. Am I correct that such "handheld HDR" is as not easy with slower cameras (5D2?) as the time to shoot 3 FPS is more than 0,5 seconds longer than 1D3?

Mikael



Sep 26, 2012 at 06:15 PM
Monito
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


Yes, it might help at the margin. But I wouldn't worry about it. I usually shoot HDR with at least a second in between shots so that I can click to lock the mirror up and then click the shot.

I would love for a high res (32 to 50 Mp) Canon DSLR to skip Continuous mode entirely, especially if it had an HDR 3, 5, and 7 shot mode with mirror lockup between shots.



Sep 26, 2012 at 06:54 PM
Xavier Rival
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


Monito wrote:
I would love for a high res (32 to 50 Mp) Canon DSLR to skip Continuous mode entirely, especially if it had an HDR 3, 5, and 7 shot mode with mirror lockup between shots.


Totally agreed.

I have not had time to look into this, but this feature may actually be in Magic Lantern (if it is not, then here is the suggestion for the ML team; if it is, we can hope Canon will consider it in the future...).



Sep 26, 2012 at 07:34 PM
wfrank
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


Hej/Terve Mikael,

I never had the patience for tripoding but used to do a fair amount of HDRs all handheld, sometimes leaning on a post/wall or similar. I went through a XXXD series (slow), via the 7D (fast!) and now the 5D2 (slow). I got no significant difference with these cameras when doing handheld HDR. The thing is that e.g. photomatix aligns images (if you "move") and if you learn to control it somewhat you'll see no difference in the result. Moving objects and so forth demands de-ghosting, but the faster camera wont help you there, it always about shutter times for the individual images anyway.

Here are two 5D2 handheld examples (with a former favorite of mine, the Samyang 35/1.4):


IMG_7247_8_9_tonemapped 1280 by Wilhelm Frank - Stockholm, on Flickr


IMG_6964_5_6_tonemapped 20120919 1280 by Wilhelm Frank - Stockholm, on Flickr


Edited on Sep 26, 2012 at 08:58 PM · View previous versions



Sep 26, 2012 at 08:50 PM
Ben Horne
Online
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


Rather than focusing your attention on HDR, take a look at manual blending. It takes a bit more effort, but you'll end up with much better photos.


Sep 26, 2012 at 08:57 PM
RobDickinson
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


A lot of my recent stuff has been HDR or blended using magic lanterns hdr/bracketing functions.


Northshore Sunrise by robjdickinson, on Flickr


little hagley springtime by robjdickinson, on Flickr

This one is a manual blend of 4-5 shots.

Sumner Dawn by robjdickinson, on Flickr

This one is hand held, with handheld shots be prepaired for reduced sharpness and smaller print sizes, even more so than with single shots.

Dyers Pass sunset by robjdickinson, on Flickr



Sep 26, 2012 at 09:09 PM
alexdi
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


Beautiful photos. I could have sworn the 5D II does support continuous-mode bracketing.


Sep 26, 2012 at 09:40 PM
RobDickinson
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


5d2 as standard will shoot all 3 bracketed shots if you use the 2 second timer mode. Even in single shot mode.

handheld a faster fps is a little easier and also prevents more movement of subjects (birds, waves etc).



Sep 26, 2012 at 09:43 PM
Monito
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


alexdi wrote:
Beautiful photos. I could have sworn the 5D II does support continuous-mode bracketing.


It does, but I don't think with mirror staying locked up between shots. I'll have to try that.



Sep 26, 2012 at 09:44 PM
RobDickinson
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


Not sure about the mirror, or in live view, perhaps with mlu?


Sep 26, 2012 at 09:45 PM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



bbasiaga
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


I've played with the in-cam HDR function in my 5D3 a couple times (literally, twice). At 6fps it takes all the photos with one press of the button (this is a configurable setting). Handheld with shutter speeds faster than 1/100, the non-moving part of the photos was plenty sharp using my 24-105 F4L IS.

I did, however, find that you get interesting effects if people are walking through the image when you take it. Even a half second for the burst is too slow to freeze them out.

-Brian






Sep 27, 2012 at 01:50 AM
thedutt
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


5DIII has handheld HDR option, it works resonably well but at loss of some sharpness. In Camera "Natural" style HRD From 5D III is actually quite nice. With a little bit of selective exposure adjustment, the results can be quite nice.




Sep 27, 2012 at 02:29 AM
Mikael B
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


Great to see all the discussion about this topic =).

As commented earlier, I actually tried few times HDR on 1D2 with fast shutter speeds and then combined the final image in Photomatix. I think it removed the minor ghosting quite well and the final image was rather good. Ofcourse there was one person walking in the background so it result in the same situation as Brian above, but not so harsh as it was more of landscape photo anyway =). Sharpness at normal viewing wasn't an issue, but when viewed 100 % you could see some minor degrade in sharpenss, especially on trees.

I also tried out of curiosity shooting one RAW and converting it to 3 different JPEG (-2, 0, +2 EV) and then combining it as HDR photo. I think the outcome wasn't as bad as I thought, but 3 RAW from which the HDR was created resulted in a bit nicer colors. Anyone else has used this method for HDR? I think it was tested also in some UK photo magazine so I think I'm not the only one testing it =).

Mikael




Sep 27, 2012 at 04:54 AM
RobDickinson
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #14 · p.1 #14 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


I've not tried the single raw approach to true HDR mapping, do it manually sometimes but mostly I work on local contrast in ph.


Sep 27, 2012 at 05:45 AM
alexdi
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #15 · p.1 #15 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


A note on the 5D II:

Stock, it'll do MLU with bracketing, but not in continuous mode. You have to mash the shutter for each frame. In continuous mode, it'll bang out three shots at once, but it won't use MLU.

With Magic Lantern, you get both, with up to something like nine shots. Yet another reason to install it.



Sep 28, 2012 at 11:24 AM
Monito
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #16 · p.1 #16 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


With DPP you can apply the HDR 'process' to a single Raw (and I think also JPEG) image. What it ends up doing is tone-mapping it with the local constrast technique common to a lot of software, but it does a reasonable job and provides some sliders. It ends up being a useful free tool in addition to what it can do with three Raws.



Sep 28, 2012 at 11:40 AM
n0b0
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #17 · p.1 #17 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


Photomatix can create a pseudo HDR image from a single RAW, but the end result is a little noisy I think.


Sep 28, 2012 at 11:48 AM
GammyKnee
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #18 · p.1 #18 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


I'd say faster fps has got to help with handheld bracketing unless your holding technique is really, really good. I get away without using a tripod for some shots with my 7D, but if I have a tripod with me I always use it.

As an aside, I use the following configuration for bracketing with my 7D:
- Rear button AF, no AF on the shutter button
- Live view (quicker and easier to get to on 7D than mlu)
- Hi speed continuous

When everything's ready I just hold down the shutter button on my remote and let the camera rattle through the three shots as quick as it can. The fast turnaround of the hi-speed can help even here because there's less opportunity for a breeze to kick up and move something in the shot. The mirror does not drop once during the sequence.

Are folks saying that the 5D II behaves differently in this respect? Very interested in this as I'm considering getting one as a companion to my 7D.



Sep 28, 2012 at 06:16 PM
OntheRez
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #19 · p.1 #19 · Shooting HDR photos with Canon cameras


I generally do all bracketing on a tripod for obvious reasons. Still there are times that one can't (or won't) use a tripod. I've had some quite successful hand held "HDR" photos with a 1DIV, 5 shot bracket, high speed shooting. Yes, there is some movement, but modern software mostly can compensate for it.

There are always those who sneer at HDR, I assume because some photographers do "interesting" things with their shots. At it's basic level it is a simple tool for extending the dynamic range of a photo. Hard to imagine someone finding that offensive.

Robert



Sep 28, 2012 at 06:47 PM





FM Forums | Canon Forum | Join Upload & Sell

    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Reset password