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Archive 2012 · Better resolution available?
  
 
jekmandco
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p.1 #1 · Better resolution available?


Ok... so I wasnt sure if this should go here in the Canon forum or maybe in the post processing forum, but thought I would start here as I feel it has as much to do with the camera.

So, I have some pictures from our trip to Italy that I took back in April/May and would like to have the printed and some enlarged when printed. One of the pictures taken on my 40D in particular was shot at L jpg file on camera. I needed to rotate/straighten out the picture and then crop it. So I opened it up in photoshop, CS3,(which I need to say I really dont know much at all about... youtube is my best friend when it comes to photoshop) straightened it out and from watching some of the videos telling me how to do it I started looking at the resolution and it was at 72!

I guess my question is... is there something in the camera that I can change to bring this up higher? My understanding is that its best for prints to have 240 or higher and I am afraid that my 72 isnt going to cut it.

Also can I change this in photoshop without hurting the picture if I have it printed and enlarged? It is a photo taken at night.



Sep 18, 2012 at 11:00 PM
vsg28
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p.1 #2 · Better resolution available?


72 what? DPI?


Sep 18, 2012 at 11:02 PM
jekmandco
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p.1 #3 · Better resolution available?


vsg28 wrote:
72 what? DPI?


yes I think dpi is correct. 72 was the number in the resolution box in Photoshop.



Sep 18, 2012 at 11:04 PM
EB-1
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p.1 #4 · Better resolution available?


72 ppi is the default for the JPEG. All you should care about are the

EBH



Sep 18, 2012 at 11:42 PM
vsg28
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p.1 #5 · Better resolution available?


What he said. You should be fine with that resolution, try out a single print from Walgreens or something like that to test.

Next time, shoot in Raw and directly print.



Sep 18, 2012 at 11:51 PM
 

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Monito
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p.1 #6 · Better resolution available?


72 dpi is a meaningless number in the usual course of events. At most it is a hint to the printer.

On Canon DSLRs, they pump out the JPEGs with 72 dpi as the default setting.

Pixels rule. If you have enough pixels, then you can print. Fine Large JPEG image = enough pixels for largish prints.

Resize the image to the print size you want, measured in inches, but turn off resampling the image. That will cause the DPI to change, but the number of pixels will be the same. Make sure you have the right aspect ratio. Send that to the printer. The printer will ignore the dpi and print it your size.



Sep 19, 2012 at 12:01 AM
AJSJones
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p.1 #7 · Better resolution available?


Image/Image size in the PS menu bar. Just uncheck "Resample image" and type in whatever number you like into the resolution box. It won't change the data in the file one little bit. You will notice that as you do, the dimensions in inches will change -because dpi (more properly ppi) means pixels per inch and if you have a fixed number of pixels, then the inches have to change if you change the ppi


Sep 19, 2012 at 01:38 AM
gdanmitchell
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p.1 #8 · Better resolution available?


Resolution values mean different things at different points in the post processing, uh, process.

When the image arrives in your image processing application (such as photoshop) the program essentially assigns a resolution, often the 72 figure that you see. But at this stage, the value is largely irrelevant.

When you print, the story is different. At that point you'll specify two things. One is the height/width dimensions of the print, corresponding to how large of a print area you want to fill on your paper. The second is, again, "resolution." Here, resolution matters. You are unlikely to be happy with resolution much lower than about 200, and many consider 180 to be an approximate lower limit for high quality large prints. There are a number of thoughts about the best resolution values to select when you print, but rather than "go there," let's just say that something in the 200-300 range is probably usually fine.

At this stage, if you select a specific image size (height x width), the number of pixels in the image may not quite match up at the resolution you select. Here the image size dialog box lets you make these specifications and then "interpolates" (essentially, invents additional pixels as needed) to produce the pixels you need for the print.

Dan



Sep 19, 2012 at 02:06 AM
bbasiaga
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p.1 #9 · Better resolution available?


How big are you looking to go? I've got a really nice 13x19 taken with my old Digital Rebel, which was 6.3 megapixels. So you could crop off about 40% of your 40D image and still have that many pixels.

Do as said above and change the DPI in CS3 to whatever you want - say 240. That'll show you the image dimensions you can print at that resolution.


-Brian



Sep 19, 2012 at 03:07 AM
WAYCOOL
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p.1 #10 · Better resolution available?


A post explaining ppi
http://dougieville.us/bourne/bornewrong.htm



Sep 19, 2012 at 03:18 AM





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