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Archive 2012 · Beginners Photography ISO question
  
 
speakit101
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Beginners Photography ISO question


I want to be a sports photographer for a side hobby. I notice on alot of the pics that are posted especially in the football area where thtere is alot of movement. People are saying that the ISOis @ 10,000 and some I have seen higher. How is that so when most cameras are set between 50-6400. Now unless i'm missing something how is that so? One more thing what camera do recommend in the Canon DSLR world do you recommend with a $1200.00 budget. I have a wide variety of lens. Thanks for any input in advance.




Sep 11, 2012 at 11:30 AM
borderlight
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Beginners Photography ISO question


Here's a Canon blurb for the Mark IV:

The EOS-1D Mark IV camera's ISO speed settings range from 100 up to 12,800 in 1/3 or 1/2 stop increments with ISO Expansion settings of L: 50 for bright light or H1: 25,600, H2: 51,200, and H3: 102,400 for even the most dimly lit situations. Photographers and documentary filmmakers working in available light will be impressed by the low-noise image quality of the 1D Mark IV, capturing amazing still images and video footage even at speed settings as high as ISO 12,800.

A $1200 budget will get you a new Canon Rebel and maybe a used 70-200 F4 IS. Not knowing your "wide variety of lenses" it would be impossible to know what you really need. Maybe you should go for a higher quality body instead. I would ask on the Canon forum, not here. Try to be more specific too.





Sep 11, 2012 at 03:55 PM
Mickey
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Beginners Photography ISO question


When you get into the higher end professional cameras you get the much higher ISOs. Likely not to be found on a Rebel.


Sep 11, 2012 at 10:14 PM
speakit101
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Beginners Photography ISO question


Well I have the canon zoom ef 70-200mm 1:4, canon zoom ef 75-300mm 1:4-5.6, canon 28-135mm to name a few. Will not buy anymore until I upgrade on a new body. Thanks again for the information.


Sep 11, 2012 at 10:29 PM
trenchmonkey
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Beginners Photography ISO question


In addition to a body that can shoot relatively clean ISO6400, you'll be wanting...at the very least...
some f2.8 glass (or faster) when the lighting gets bad. Most of lenses you list are too slow for sports.



Sep 12, 2012 at 11:19 AM
 

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borderlight
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Beginners Photography ISO question


If you can spring $300 more, or sell off one or two of your f5.6 lenses, you can get a 7D @ $1500. Stick with IS lenses if you can.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/646908-REG/Canon_3814B004_EOS_7D_SLR_Digital.html



Sep 13, 2012 at 12:23 AM
dcains
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Beginners Photography ISO question


borderlight wrote:
Stick with IS lenses if you can.


IS lenses will be of no help when shooting fast action, but a faster shutter speed will - thus the need for faster lenses and higher ISO capability.



Sep 13, 2012 at 12:32 AM
jcolwell
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Beginners Photography ISO question


I generally get decent results with shutter speeds of 1/400 sec and faster.

dcains wrote:
IS lenses will be of no help when shooting fast action, but a faster shutter speed will - thus the need for faster lenses and higher ISO capability.


+1

I've spent a lot of extra money for IS on some of my lenses, but I generally turn it off for sports. A pratical guideline could be this - if you're holding the lens steady and pointing it in the same direction while watching for 'the moment', and you're still pointing it in the same direction when you take the photo, then IS can be of high value. If you're moving the lens around while you follow the action, then you'll probably be better off with no IS. "Mode 2" IS for panning can be very useful, but only in limited circumstances.

Basically, you have four parameters to play with: shutter speed, lens aperture, ISO, and cost. It's always a trade off.



Sep 13, 2012 at 12:54 AM
speakit101
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Beginners Photography ISO question


Wow you guys are awesome I appreciate your comments. Thanks so much!


Sep 13, 2012 at 11:10 AM





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