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Archive 2012 · Catch light in Portrait
  
 
ravisrajan
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p.1 #1 · Catch light in Portrait


Hello experts,
I would like to get some advice from experts on catch light on portrait. Over the weekend I have used two Einstein with less than 1/3 power. First I adjusted fill that would produce about f/8 and placed about 6 foot from subject and camera right same height as subject. Second light adjusted until to get f/11 as main light placed 45 degree on left about 6 foot and 6 foot from subject. Both these lights are mounted on silver PLM umbrella with white front diffuser.
The issue I am facing is that I am getting two catch lights on subject eye. I am not sure that is good or bad. I did some research on this FM, none found and googled I canít seem to find correct answer.
http://photo.stackexchange.com/questions/11657/in-portrait-photography-what-is-a-catchlight
Attached full image and 100% crop of eye with two catch light.
Advance thanks for your advice.










  Canon EOS 5D Mark II    EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM lens    130mm    f/11.0    1/200s    100 ISO    0.0 EV  




Sep 06, 2012 at 02:02 AM
AuntiPode
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p.1 #2 · Catch light in Portrait


Looks over-illuminated to me. Why use two such lights? Won't one broad primary light do? Save the second light for the background or use it as a hair light. In a pinch, if you must work with what you made, re-touch to remove the lover left catch-lights.


Sep 06, 2012 at 04:03 AM
shortpballer
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p.1 #3 · Catch light in Portrait


move them to the sides more... catch lights are a simple reflection in the eyes. If you don't want them to show, you move them far above the model, or completely to the sides. Normally to create such a look and wrap light around your subject, you need large lighting gear. I am able to do this with my 4x6 ft softbox and was able to do this with my elinchrom octa (which I no longer have)

In your picture it looks as if the lights were RIGHT next to you... considering your arm is covering one of the lights a little and your arm is right next to the other...



Sep 06, 2012 at 02:19 PM
Camperjim
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p.1 #4 · Catch light in Portrait


It would be easy to salvage this image with a few minutes using the healing brush and/or clone tool. I don't do much portrait work but if you want some great tutorials on portrait lighting check out the streaming videos on the BH webpage under Event Space.


Sep 06, 2012 at 06:31 PM
 

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ravisrajan
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p.1 #5 · Catch light in Portrait


Thanks every one for thier input.


Sep 07, 2012 at 01:10 PM
scottiedds
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p.1 #6 · Catch light in Portrait


I agree, the lights are to directed to the front of the model. The main light ideally should be 45 degrees from model to camera to light and above the model in conventional lighting. the fill light should be more to the side, it is too straight on, the fill light should also be a litte lower in power than the main light. hope that helps.


Sep 11, 2012 at 02:43 AM
silvawispa
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p.1 #7 · Catch light in Portrait


Beautiful model, and double catchlights are neither good nor bad of themselves.
In this case they are slightly distracting because you don't have a truly seperate fill and main light here. They're acting as one light, yet we see two sources.
You have one effective light source that's huge and flat. (See how the very top of her head appears to be on the same plane as her face? Therefore, the term flat, you've given us no visual clues to depth and relied on our experience of human heads.)
If this is the result you wanted, and the double catchlight was an oversight, then, if you think you need to, remove one of them.
Personally, I think hitting somebody flat in the face with a lot of light isn't the most flattering thing we can do for them most of the time.
It might help if you think in shadows as well as lights. Shadows can be used to define and flatter shapes (not just faces), they are one of our key visual clues when regarding a two dimensional image.
I apologise if this is patronising, but I have only this image to know you and your abilities from.



Sep 11, 2012 at 07:47 AM
RustyBug
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p.1 #8 · Catch light in Portrait


silvawispa wrote:
They're acting as one light, yet we see two sources.
You have one effective light source that's huge and flat.


+1



Sep 11, 2012 at 01:18 PM





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