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Archive 2012 · hotel room shots
  
 
boshek
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p.1 #1 · hotel room shots


I just got a job to shoot newly renovated hotel rooms. Now here come the questions:

tripod i assume?
is a 11-16 tokina 2.8 on a d7000 wide enough?
do I stitch photos together?
slow shutter and no flash??


i also have a 24-70 that I can use with my d700.

as usual thanks!



Aug 24, 2012 at 03:18 PM
GCasey
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p.1 #2 · hotel room shots


You have a lot of practicing to do in a hurry. Practice, using your bedroom as a model if necessary, every aspect of a shoot, including processing.

Years ago a colleague looked for work when jobs could not be found. He found a job at the end of a week and could start Monday if he also had the ability to type. He said, yes, rented a typewriter and taught himself to type during the weekend.

You can answer your questions more thoroughly if you practice. Yes, the equipment is adequate.



Aug 24, 2012 at 03:42 PM
boshek
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p.1 #3 · hotel room shots


thanks gcasey, no flash


Aug 24, 2012 at 03:45 PM
bl4scott
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p.1 #4 · hotel room shots


I have done something like this before - watch for cords and items in the background. Long exposure, make sure you watch WB. Try and get multiple angles of each room as what you might prefer could be different from the clients.



Aug 24, 2012 at 04:26 PM
boshek
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p.1 #5 · hotel room shots


thanks, going to bracket exposures, use a tripod and the built in timer. and watch for ugly cords as you stated, ty!



Aug 24, 2012 at 04:47 PM
 

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JohnBrose
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p.1 #6 · hotel room shots


Keep camera level so vertical lines are straight. Watch details in the frame, if lights are visable in image, have light coming from them. Balance interior light with light from windows either with flash/exposure or combined images. Look for angles/perspective to bring out the best in the hotel/rooms. You could rent a 14-24 lens for your d700, I think that would be a better combination.


Aug 25, 2012 at 06:36 PM
boshek
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p.1 #7 · hotel room shots


JohnBrose wrote:
Keep camera level so vertical lines are straight. Watch details in the frame, if lights are visable in image, have light coming from them. Balance interior light with light from windows either with flash/exposure or combined images. Look for angles/perspective to bring out the best in the hotel/rooms. You could rent a 14-24 lens for your d700, I think that would be a better combination.



good advice, thanks

i dont plan on using flash, i thought the tripod and long exposures would give me a more even exposure, but I might bounce some flash, see how it looks.


i got a 11-16 for the d7000(for free)........I think I will be covered!



Aug 25, 2012 at 06:43 PM
Nozzleforward
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p.1 #8 · hotel room shots


I've tried stitching images together from interiors, could just be my (elementary) skillset when it comes to stitching, but it didn't turn out very well and took a lot of effort.

One bit of advice that I got from a similar post I made a while back was to shoot stopped way down, like f22, and just run a long exposure. Keeps everything in the whole place in focus. You will see some weird light leaking through windows / doors though sometimes when you have such low shutter speeds, but I've been able to adapt to it. Also, minor things like cords here and there that you missed before can be cloned out later, but I wouldn't make a habit of it, you'll find yourself spending more time cloning out bits of paper, cords, odd shadows and such than you do shooting.

I think that 11-16 on a D7000 would be plenty wide for a hotel room. When stopped down this far, sharpness and vignetting won't be an issue regardless of which lens you are shooting with.



Aug 25, 2012 at 06:58 PM
Sneakyracer
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p.1 #9 · hotel room shots


Hi, I have shot a LOT of buildings and architecture interiors for design and construction professionals, building materials and equipment manufacturers and magazines.

About 90% of my interior shots have been made using either the 12-24mm sigma @ 12mm or the 14mm Canon, the rest I use the 24mm TSE, always on full frame Cameras (started with the 5D classic).

First, you need to visualize the shots. Look at the space critically. Look for eye sores, move stuff If you can. Regarding the camera and gear, Its best to carefully level it and use a slow shutter at low iso. Try to use existing lighting. I prefer the cool exterior light of dusk/dawn filtering in or if its harsh I try to close the sheer curtains if they are there to soften the light. So its very important if the clients want the exterior showing in some shots.

Depending on the size of the Hotel room the 11-16 on a crop sensor might not be enough. Most clients LOVE the extreme wide angle (but rectilinear) look. Makes any room look more spacious!



Aug 26, 2012 at 03:33 AM





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