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Archive 2012 · help with file rendering
  
 
Guari
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p.1 #1 · help with file rendering


I have been shooting at higher than-used-to ISO's with my D800 (used to have a d300). Shooting JPG + RAW.

In a couple pics I noticed some weird rendering of highlights in the RAW files. Like if the channels had saturated and went ballistics. This does not show in the JPG's. I'm quite puzzled and I am unsure if it is due to the demosaicing of the DNG's. I messed up as I noticed this artifact after having erased the original NEF files.

I was wondering if eyes with more experience could take a look at this

This files were converted to DNG previous to import using adobe DNG converter (the same LR uses behind the screen). then imported to LR (v3.6) (will update in a couple months to LR4). Nothing has been tinkered with, no NR, no sharpening, nothing, for any file.

First, the JPG

JPG

Then the DNG, look above the woman's head, near the purple colours

DNG

DNG 100% crop

DNG crop

Thank you

PS: I hope these links to the images work


EDIT: ISO 3200, 50mm @f1.8, 1/80



Aug 19, 2012 at 11:00 PM
Guari
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p.1 #2 · help with file rendering


No one has the slightest idea?


Aug 20, 2012 at 06:49 AM
brockwhittaker
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p.1 #3 · help with file rendering


Hmm. That is strange. I'm responding to bump this, because I'm kind of curious. Could it have been the lighting? I know that neon, or strong lighting does this to my camera (Canon 5D).


Aug 20, 2012 at 06:55 AM
Guari
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p.1 #4 · help with file rendering


Thanks brock.

First time i've seen a jpg keeping things very well controlled and having the raw go out of whack, it's like the colours in the raw were blooming... that's what puzzles me...



Aug 20, 2012 at 07:58 AM
 

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brucemuir
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p.1 #5 · help with file rendering


Canon has a tendency to do this in the reds if you aren't careful.
Seems the red channel blows easier.

As for why this isn't present in the jpeg IDK but maybe there is some highlight rescuing in the conversion algorithms.



Aug 20, 2012 at 08:43 AM
Guari
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p.1 #6 · help with file rendering


brucemuir wrote:
Canon has a tendency to do this in the reds if you aren't careful.
Seems the red channel blows easier.

As for why this isn't present in the jpeg IDK but maybe there is some highlight rescuing in the conversion algorithms.


Fair enough, guess I'll have to keep my eyes peeled if shooting under such conditions..

Thanks for the reply



Aug 20, 2012 at 08:51 AM
S Dilworth
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p.1 #7 · help with file rendering


As brucemuir suggests, this artefact is caused by one or more blown (overexposed) channels. Raw converters produce varying results in attempting to tone down these blown areas, and in this case the in-camera version is more pleasing – at least with the Lightroom settings you've used here.

Todd Owyoung touches upon this here, with his usual super-slick presentation (scroll down to "Blown Channels/Saturation").

It has nothing to do with NEF versus DNG, so don't worry about that – except that Nikon's otherwise unusable CaptureNX2 would mimic the in-camera results if fed the original NEF.

One thing to keep in mind is that the Nikon D800 (and D300 for that matter) aren't much less noisy at high ISO than low ISO. So you can often avoid blown channels by simply shooting the same exposure (e.g. 1/80th at f/1.8) at a much lower ISO setting, like ISO 200, and then massively increasing the brightness of the dark areas in post.



Aug 20, 2012 at 03:31 PM
Guari
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p.1 #8 · help with file rendering


S Dilworth wrote:
As brucemuir suggests, this artefact is caused by one or more blown (overexposed) channels. Raw converters produce varying results in attempting to tone down these blown areas, and in this case the in-camera version is more pleasing – at least with the Lightroom settings you've used here.

Todd Owyoung touches upon this here, with his usual super-slick presentation (scroll down to "Blown Channels/Saturation").

It has nothing to do with NEF versus DNG, so don't worry about that – except that Nikon's otherwise unusable CaptureNX2 would mimic the in-camera results if fed the original NEF.

One thing to keep in mind is that the Nikon
...Show more

Great info, thank you for the insight. As mentioned, I was not worried but rather bemused at this rendering. I just wasn't sure of why the differences between the raws and jpgs.

the various posts have clarified it. Thanks very much



Aug 20, 2012 at 04:05 PM





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