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Archive 2012 · Water splashes in a shot glass
  
 
justindong
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p.1 #1 · Water splashes in a shot glass


This is my very first attempt at macro. I've been saving up for a 105mm from nikon but my dad had an old 55mm/3.5 from his photography days so I decided to give it a spin.

I enjoyed it a lot but manual focus was pretty tricky for macro. The real big problem though was that sometimes I'd have to get so close that the lens would block the light. I'm assuming this wouldn't really be a problem at 105mm. Anyways, I'd just like some tips for how to effectively shoot these splashes. I realize that I could've gotten way closer for the first one, but my main interest is if there might be a way to get most of the water splashes in focus. In these photos I just focused on the front of the shot glass. Even if I had the AF, I don't think it would be able to focus on the water splashes in time


Splash by justindong, on Flickr


Drops from Dublin by justindong, on Flickr


Separation by justindong, on Flickr



Aug 11, 2012 at 09:16 AM
birdied
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p.1 #2 · Water splashes in a shot glass


Hi Justin, very nice first try on these. While I have not done these particular types of shots, I do like to do falling water drops. I think the principal is much the same.

I use the following:

Nikon 60mm macro
SB900 Flash
Camera on tripod
Remote release ( but not absolutely necessary)
White Poster board for background to bounce the flash

Manual settings on the camera-
Shutter usually from 1/160 to 1/250
Aperture from f/8 to f/16

Flash settings - I normally use the TTL , but if doing manual - 1/4 to 1/16 power

Flash is off camera pointed to the white poster board. I normally put the flash on the left side .

The flash is what freezes the motion. The largest aperture you can get will give you greater depth of field.

For the drop shots I use a tooth pick and manually focus on it where the drops are falling.

I don't know where you were focused on these shots, but it looks as if your focus was on below the word Dublin.
I would move my focus point higher. If you are trying to get the water splash above the glass, I would you a pencil , put it in the water and focus on the pencil at the high you are trying to capture the splash or drops. Stop down as much as possible to get the greatest depth of field you need .

Here are a couple of links to some videos on water photography that might help you refine your techniques.
Remember, there is a lot of trial and error . Lots of fun and some frustration

Hope this helps


Water with one speed light


Water and Bottle

Have fun and just experiment with the aperture and shutter speeds until you find what works for you.

Birdie






















Aug 11, 2012 at 02:27 PM
justindong
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p.1 #3 · Water splashes in a shot glass


birdied wrote:
Hi Justin, very nice first try on these. While I have not done these particular types of shots, I do like to do falling water drops. I think the principal is much the same.

I use the following:

Nikon 60mm macro
SB900 Flash
Camera on tripod
Remote release ( but not absolutely necessary)
White Poster board for background to bounce the flash

Manual settings on the camera-
Shutter usually from 1/160 to 1/250
Aperture from f/8 to f/16

Flash settings - I normally use the TTL , but if doing manual - 1/4 to 1/16 power

Flash is off camera pointed to the white poster board. I normally put the
...Show more

First off, thank you so much - your post was extremely informative! And those reflections in the water drops are insane! I have an external flash but it's at intermediate level and I'm still learning how to use it. I can sync it with the on-camera flash and that's gotten me good results.

Anyways, this will probably sound really stupid but why is the flash needed to "freeze" the water? I did a search on it but many of the top results just tell me that I'll need a flash to do it. Is it because lots of times water drop pictures are done indoors? The pics I posted in my first post were taken outdoors and I didn't use any sort of flash (I actually wasn't even aware it was a necessity) and I actually did a burst of about 5 shots at 1/2000th sec each to catch the whole motion.

Would using the flash contribute anything outdoors? For the double shot glass picture in particular, timing it is really tricky and setting it up again is slightly annoying, that's why I was doing rapid fire.

I practiced a bit indoors in a bathroom. I didn't have anyone to help me out this this time so I had to pull the trigger and release the glass by myself. The flash was immensely helpful though, I did f/16 at 1/250 exposure, which seemed to be more than fast enough to capture the motion. I noticed that with f/16 the splashes were definitely clearer, though I guess since there's such a random factor not everything will always fall in the plane of focus

Here's a sample shot. Don't mind the background (the bathroom -_-) since it's f/16 and I don't exactly have a setup for these types of pictures.

This one is f/8

DSC_5157 by justindong, on Flickr

This one is f/16

DSC_5161 by justindong, on Flickr



Aug 11, 2012 at 06:13 PM
birdied
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p.1 #4 · Water splashes in a shot glass


Hi Justin. Glad to help.
I don't completely understand or know why the flash freezes the action. However, one of the issues is ambient light .
If the flash is strong enough to overcome the ambient light it will freeze the motion and give you sharper images.
( Your shots today are a prime example of that ) The flash will also allow you greater depth of field with a stopped down aperture.

The flash burst is so fast it overpowers the ambient light. Some folks will tell you to do these types of shots in the dark. I personally have never done them in the dark, as my flash has been sufficient.

Your shots today are much sharper , clearer and more defined. If your bathroom is the place to do these, then just prop some poster board of a piece of white paper behind your glass and you won't see anything in the background.

Any questions, just let me know. I learned by folks helping me , so just trying to pass on what little I can.

Birdie








Aug 12, 2012 at 02:54 AM





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