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Archive 2012 · "Muddy" Looking Print
  
 
Edwin Ho
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · "Muddy" Looking Print


Please enlighten me. I have recently bought Spyder 4 Express and calibratered my Samsung 23 inch monitor. I am quite pleased with the improved colours that see on the monitor.

I use LR3 and converted RAW files to Jpegs for print from the usual local one-hour print outlet. I am very disappointed with the result as the prints were quite dull, contrary to what I see on the monitor. Has this something to do with colour space? This is a subject which I do not understand very much. I recall that I have converted to Jpeg with colour space sRGB and when I checked with print store, I was told their printers are set for Adobe RGB.

Your advice is most appreciated, thank you.




Jul 31, 2012 at 02:10 PM
cgardner
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · "Muddy" Looking Print


Can you post one of the photos you had a printing problem with?

Did you make a lot of corrections based on what you saw on screen or are the files straight out of camera and just converted from RAW > JPG?



Jul 31, 2012 at 09:32 PM
Mark Metternich
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · "Muddy" Looking Print


Need to calibrate your monitor for print (I darken mine considerably before running the Spyder 3 Elite to 2.2 gamma, 6500 white point and NATIVE for brightness) and then use their profile to soft proof them (so Lightroom or Photoshop simulates what they will actually look like when they get printed). Then all will be well.


Aug 01, 2012 at 12:27 AM
Edwin Ho
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · "Muddy" Looking Print


Attached is the link to one of the photos that i sent to the printer.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/edwinho/7691782984/in/photostream




Aug 01, 2012 at 03:48 PM
Edwin Ho
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · "Muddy" Looking Print


Mark Metternich wrote:
Need to calibrate your monitor for print (I darken mine considerably before running the Spyder 3 Elite to 2.2 gamma, 6500 white point and NATIVE for brightness) and then use their profile to soft proof them (so Lightroom or Photoshop simulates what they will actually look like when they get printed). Then all will be well.


Mark, thanks. I use a Samsung monitor model SA350. I don't seem to be able to locate adjustment for 6500 white point and NATIVE brightness.

But then if I darken the monitor for print, then wouldn't it be too dark for general viewing.



Aug 01, 2012 at 03:56 PM
 

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Peter Figen
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · "Muddy" Looking Print


The correct monitor luminance for you will be based on the level of ambient light in your editing room. It's the ratio between the ambient and the screen that determines the correct perception of screen brightness, if you will. Unfortunately, there are no hard and fast rules for these numbers, but it's not hard to figure out with a little trial and error.

More important in your monitor calibration is, of course, the monitor luminance as measure in candelas per meter squared (cd/m2), which on an old fashioned CRT would have been around 85 cd/m2, but with most LCD screens will be in the 120 cd/m2 range. For the same perception you need to raise the ambient room levels to compensate.

You should never, however, change the brightness of you screen after you calibrate. To do so completely invalidates your monitor profile - which is describing the total calibration parameters to Ps - and will never give you an accurate view. Set you monitor luminance in your calibration software and leave it there.



Aug 01, 2012 at 04:17 PM
Edwin Ho
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · "Muddy" Looking Print


Thank you all for helping me out and I seem to have the problem fixed. I re-calibrated again with Spyder4express, but set the brightness to 60 (instead of 100) prior to calibration. Unfortunately, my monitor has no provision to set white point to recommended 6500. Resolution was set at native 1920 x 1080. So the only adjustment made was lowering the brightness.

I re-edited a photo and brought it down to another one hour lab printer. I requested two copies to be printed, one without "correction' and the second one with manual correction as she saw fit. They both turn out very acceptable. She made a slight correction on the second print by adding a little 'warmth". However the first print without correction was pretty close to what i saw on the monitor (and this what I am after).

I am at peace now, and thank you all.



Aug 02, 2012 at 10:33 AM
Alan321
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · "Muddy" Looking Print


The whitest and brightest part of a typical print has no ink on it and so the brightest is determined by the paper and the brightness of the lighting where the print is viewed. You need to know how bright that is so that you can set your monitor to it or something close to it for assessing images that are destined for print. Unfortunately that will look pretty dull for normal stuff as nothing on the screen will look like it was photographed in daylight. My print target is about 90 Cd/m2 but I want more like 140 for normal viewing and editing.

You can either change monitor calibration and profile according to your intention (printing or on-screen viewing) or you can set it up for normal on-screen work and have a separate profile for the prints but based on the monitor being set to higher brightness level. Then you would need to soft-proof each image to assess how it will look in print.

The printer needs to be profiled too, unless they insist on say standard sRGB, but even then your print profile can make allowances for the contrast ratio that suits your viewing conditions and prints.

Note that a print that looks most acceptable in a not too bright room at night may look crappy in daylight, and vice versa.




Aug 03, 2012 at 03:41 PM
tived
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · "Muddy" Looking Print


take it to fitzys in fitzgerald st north perth, ask them to check the file b4 printing...

and no, i don't think they do 15cent prints :-)

best of luck

Henrik



Aug 06, 2012 at 12:34 AM
Mark Metternich
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · "Muddy" Looking Print


Edwin Ho wrote:
Mark, thanks. I use a Samsung monitor model SA350. I don't seem to be able to locate adjustment for 6500 white point and NATIVE brightness.

But then if I darken the monitor for print, then wouldn't it be too dark for general viewing.



Yes. Separate calibrations for web and print. They are two entirely different beasts! Personally I do not rely on readings of my ambient room lighting but simply manually do as I mentioned above with better success. Also, I keep all monitor settings (except brightness) at default. Good luck.



Aug 07, 2012 at 06:08 PM





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