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Archive 2012 · product photography table material
  
 
pappawheely
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p.1 #1 · product photography table material


I need to shoot some large heavy automotive parts on a table. I have used plywood with white paint but the constant re-painting takes too long to dry (the client does not want to pay me to watch paint dry!) Is there a surface material that would be non-staining, durable and non-reflective that anyone can recommend?


Jul 19, 2012 at 11:29 PM
john_edwards
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p.1 #2 · product photography table material


Don't know how big the parts are but a white sheet of Formica on the plywood should work. When you said heavy I ruled out rolls of white (or any other color) as moving the parts around for the best angle would tear/smear the paper.

Spray the formica with a dull coat to kill the shine.



Jul 20, 2012 at 01:39 AM
pappawheely
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p.1 #3 · product photography table material


john_edwards wrote:
Don't know how big the parts are but a white sheet of Formica on the plywood should work. When you said heavy I ruled out rolls of white (or any other color) as moving the parts around for the best angle would tear/smear the paper.

Spray the formica with a dull coat to kill the shine.


Thanks, I was wondering if the formica would reflect the flash.



Jul 20, 2012 at 05:48 PM
Hammy
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p.1 #4 · product photography table material


Frosted plexiglass is what first comes to mind. Build it on a light box: if you want shading from above, leave the light in the box off, but if you want to illuminate detail from underneath, you could fire a strobe in the box, or have a florescent mounted in the box.

Should be mostly durable, unless you scrape and engine block across it.



Jul 20, 2012 at 08:03 PM
pappawheely
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p.1 #5 · product photography table material


Good idea Hammy but I have to shoot these monsters and they are heavy! Because of the set-up the table is at 30 degrees. The shocks always want to slide off. In the past I have used putty to hold them but I'n thinking of a big magnet on the underside of the table. Just don't know if that's feasible.




Jul 24, 2012 at 04:53 AM
Hammy
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p.1 #6 · product photography table material


Pappa,

I just used a dozen of these magnets to hold up some banners in a pavillion and they worked great.
I got the largest ones, which are only 5"x2"x2" and they are rated up to 225lbs holding strength. They may do the trick if you're only holding stuff on a slant.

Or you could magnets underneath, grabbing a metal bar (painted) that acts as a temporary/removable stop for the big boys?



Jul 24, 2012 at 02:27 PM
dcains
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p.1 #7 · product photography table material


Looks like those shocks are largely made of aluminum. Magnets I'd test to see if a small, cheap magnet sticks first.


Jul 24, 2012 at 04:30 PM
 

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JBPhotog
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p.1 #8 · product photography table material


Use Formica, flat white does the job and can be scrubbed clean if something drips. Available in 4'x8' sheets.

You said your set up table is at a 30 degree slant and if you are shooting on white you are probably close cutting the products anyway. So rather than try to stick the big items with magnets (that don't work on Aluminium) I'd rig a bar across the back cyc of the Formica clamped by two stands, one either side of the shooting table. Then wire the item to the bar with some thin wire or use heavy fishing line, pretty quick to PS it out in post.



Jul 24, 2012 at 05:04 PM
pappawheely
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p.1 #9 · product photography table material


They have aluminum bits but the cylinders are steel. I called an electromagnet company today. In order to hold the shock through even a thin sheet of formica it would take a powerful magnet that would cost several hundred dollars.


Jul 25, 2012 at 05:49 AM
zndr
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p.1 #10 · product photography table material


You could also look at a plastic like what they make cutting boards out of, it would offer the option of using a strong light to shine through it too.

Not sure on the cost but it could work.



Jul 25, 2012 at 06:56 AM
lou f
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p.1 #11 · product photography table material


would you not use 5' roll paper, just move it if it gets dirty.


Jul 25, 2012 at 11:48 AM
pappawheely
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p.1 #12 · product photography table material


Paper is a hassle. The heavy parts tear it easily and the cost ads up when you have to use such a large area. Looking for a better alternative. Thanks for all the suggestions everyone.


Jul 29, 2012 at 04:22 PM
dcains
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p.1 #13 · product photography table material


pappawheely wrote:
They have aluminum bits but the cylinders are steel. I called an electromagnet company today. In order to hold the shock through even a thin sheet of formica it would take a powerful magnet that would cost several hundred dollars.


Yup, magnetic force decreases by the inverse square of the distance between the magnet and what you want to hold. Unless you're in direct contact with the steel, you'll need a big magnet.

What about this stuff:

http://www.blutack.com/

It won't hold such heavy items on a vertical surface, but a good amount will keep them from sliding on an incline.



Jul 29, 2012 at 10:24 PM





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