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Archive 2012 · - Common animals in Norway -
  
 
Lothen
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · - Common animals in Norway -



Common animals in Norway

Norway is home to many species of wild animals. Most of the animals in Norway are not dangerous to people, and we can safely use the countryside without being afraid of wild animals. Some animals live in the forests, while others live in the mountains. Let’s take a closer look at some of them:

Bears
Squirrels
Elks
Lynx
Hares
Deer
Reindeer
Roe deer
Foxes
Wolves
Adders


Bears
There are many different types of bear. The type of bear found on the Norwegian mainland is called the brown bear. Today, there are not many brown bears left in Norway’s forests. The brown bear can grow up to 125 cm tall at the shoulder and can weigh up to 350 kg. They primarily live off berries and plants, but they can sometimes eat sheep.

Bears hibernate all winter. Their lairs can be hollowed out underground holes or caves. They sleep here until spring arrives.



Squirrels
Squirrels can be found throughout the country, but are most common in areas with spruce and pine tree forests. Squirrels are easily recognised by their large, bushy tails. Their fur is reddish brown in the summer and more of a greyish white in the winter. Squirrels live off nuts and seeds, though they can also eat chicks and bird eggs. A fully-grown squirrel weighs around 1 kg.



Elks
Elks are the largest animals in Norway’s forests. They are often called the “King of the Forest”. The antlers of a male elk can span more than 150 cm! An adult elk can be up to 230 cm tall at the shoulder and weigh between 400 and 800 kg. Elks are herbivores.



Lynx
Lynx look like large domestic cats and have characteristic black tufts on their ears. Their fur is light brown with dark spots and the tip of their tail is black. Lynx live in forested areas throughout the country up to Troms in the north. They are usually around 1 m long. Lynx are predators. They eat birds, hares and small rodents, but can also eat cats and sheep.



Hares
There are around 100 subspecies of hare in the world. The hare that lives in Norway grows to around 60 cm in length. Hares have large upper front teeth, long powerful legs, short tails and long ears. Their fur changes colour with the seasons and is greyish brown in the summer and white in the winter. Hares can be found throughout the country and flourish in forests, open countryside and the mountains. Hares are herbivores.



Deer
Deer can be found in the forests and at the edges of forests over almost all of Norway. In the summer their fur is red, grey or brown, while their winter fur is darker and greyer. Deer are herbivores and grow up to 125 cm tall at the shoulder. The males have splendid antlers. The royal stag is reckoned to be one of the most beautiful animals in the forest.



Reindeer
Most of the reindeer in Norway are domesticated animals, but wild reindeer can be found on Svalbard and in mountainous regions in the south (Hardangervidda, Dovre and Rondane). Reindeer are members of the deer family. Norwegian reindeer do not grow that big. An adult reindeer is usually between 107 cm and 127 cm tall at the shoulder. Both males and females have antlers. Reindeer are herbivores.



Roe deer
Previously roe deer could only be found in the forests and meadows of Eastern Norway, but they have now spread over almost the entire country. Roe deer belong to the deer family. The males have antlers. An adult roe deer is between 64 and 89 cm tall at the shoulder and only weighs between 17 and 23 kg. Roe deer are herbivores.



Foxes
There are 20 different subspecies of fox in the world. The most common in Norway is the red fox. Foxes live in forests. They live in lairs. A lair is an underground hole. Foxes grow to about 75 cm long. They also have long, splendid tails that grow to 50 cm in length. Their fur is mostly reddish brown, but is white on their belly and at the tip of their tail. Foxes are predators. They eat mice, hares, birds and fish. They also eat wild berries.



Wolves
Wolves belong to the dog family. They are speckled grey with a white belly. Wolves are threatened by extinction and now there are only a few individuals in the country. Wolves mostly live and hunt in packs of 6-8 animals. They live in forested areas, primarily in the regions bordering Sweden.



Adders
Adders are the only type of poisonous snake native to Norway. Adders are easily recognisable because they have zigzag stripes in their backs. Adders eat mice and other small animals. They only bite if they feel threatened. If you are bitten by an adder, you must take things as easy as possible and seek medical assistance.


© Per Lothe ( Norway )






Red Fox shoot June 2012


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© Per Lothe ( Norway )

The red fox done, now i only need to go out there and shoot the rest on my list



Best Regards
Per Lothe



Jun 08, 2012 at 02:50 PM
douter
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · - Common animals in Norway -


Thank you Per for the Natural History lesson. We sometimes don't think about what wild creatures exist in Europe, most of us being generations from there.
Nice set of foxes. Looking forward to your captures of the remaining animals on your list.
Douglas



Jun 08, 2012 at 02:58 PM
dorian
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · - Common animals in Norway -


very nice per. all of these are great, nice lighting and nice detail. makes me want to fox-nap one for a pet!

dorian



Jun 08, 2012 at 03:13 PM
CDaescher
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · - Common animals in Norway -


Very nice fox images, Per.
Looks like your list of wild animals is much longer then mine.
btw #11 is my favorite.
Chris



Jun 08, 2012 at 07:09 PM
Lothen
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · - Common animals in Norway -


douter wrote:
Thank you Per for the Natural History lesson. We sometimes don't think about what wild creatures exist in Europe, most of us being generations from there.
Nice set of foxes. Looking forward to your captures of the remaining animals on your list.
Douglas



Appreciate the nice words Douglas

Per



Jun 08, 2012 at 08:20 PM
Lothen
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · - Common animals in Norway -


dorian wrote:
very nice per. all of these are great, nice lighting and nice detail. makes me want to fox-nap one for a pet!

dorian


dorian, thank you so much

Per



Jun 08, 2012 at 08:37 PM
kmunroe
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · - Common animals in Norway -


very nice set Per


Jun 08, 2012 at 09:04 PM
Lothen
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · - Common animals in Norway -


CDaescher wrote:
Very nice fox images, Per.
Looks like your list of wild animals is much longer then mine.
btw #11 is my favorite.
Chris



Thanks for your pick Chris

Per



Jun 08, 2012 at 09:59 PM
Lothen
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · - Common animals in Norway -


kmunroe wrote:
very nice set Per



Kenny, thank you so much

Per



Jun 08, 2012 at 10:09 PM
mike717
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · - Common animals in Norway -


Nicely done Per, lovely captures!

Mike



Jun 08, 2012 at 10:17 PM
 

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Herb Houghton
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · - Common animals in Norway -


great shots Per


Jun 08, 2012 at 10:34 PM
eyelaser
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p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · - Common animals in Norway -


I love learning about the local fauna of places I haven't visited. Then to see those wonderful fox photos...well done and thanks.
Eric



Jun 08, 2012 at 11:22 PM
birdied
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p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · - Common animals in Norway -


Thank you for the detailed information on the species in your area. It is interesting to see what we have in common and what we don't. Love the shots of the red fox, especially the ones with the young one

Birdie



Jun 08, 2012 at 11:38 PM
surfnron
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p.1 #14 · p.1 #14 · - Common animals in Norway -


A very nice set Per. Keep us posted on your progress with the rest of your list ~ Ron


Jun 09, 2012 at 01:01 AM
Tim Kuhn
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p.1 #15 · p.1 #15 · - Common animals in Norway -


Super set of foxes Per!!! That and thanks for the information

Tim



Jun 09, 2012 at 01:13 AM
Jonathan Huynh
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p.1 #16 · p.1 #16 · - Common animals in Norway -


Very nice.


Jun 09, 2012 at 01:32 AM
Charlie Shugart
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p.1 #17 · p.1 #17 · - Common animals in Norway -


Great images, Per.
That fox must be familiar with the presence of people, because it certainly knew you were there, and yet seemed at least somewhat relaxed- even with her baby also there.
And thanks for the information on some of Norway's animal species. It's a subject that we don't often hear tossed around in the US.
Sometimes different words are used in N. America and Europe- for the same species:
I'm pretty sure what you call "elk" is what we call "moose" (same species). But we also have a slightly smaller member of the deer family that we call "elk." Smaller, but still very big.
And your "reindeer" are the same exact species as our "caribou."
We have three bear species: the white polar bears, the grizzly and the N. American black bears. But it gets more complicated very quickly:
Polar bears have white fur and black skin. They hunt on arctic ice floes. Males are very big, standing almost 3 meters tall and can weigh about 600 kilos.
Interior grizzlies tend to be light brown and weigh about 300-400 kilos for a large one.
Coastal grizzlies are dark brown, and as big as polar bears- males can weigh more than 600 kilos, and we call them "brown bears." Kodiak bears are probably the biggest brownies in Alaska.
N. American black bears can be black OR brown, or even blonde, cinnamon, etc. They're smaller than the other species- a 250 kilo black bear is fairly big.
Charlie



Jun 09, 2012 at 01:52 AM
Lothen
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p.1 #18 · p.1 #18 · - Common animals in Norway -


Charlie Shugart wrote:
Great images, Per.
That fox must be familiar with the presence of people, because it certainly knew you were there, and yet seemed at least somewhat relaxed- even with her baby also there.
And thanks for the information on some of Norway's animal species. It's a subject that we don't often hear tossed around in the US.
Sometimes different words are used in N. America and Europe- for the same species:
I'm pretty sure what you call "elk" is what we call "moose" (same species). But we also have a slightly smaller member of the deer family that we call "elk." Smaller, but
...Show more

Hi Charlie
Thanks for the visit. I appreciate your comments too...

That fox is, 4x fox. its 2 x baby + 1 Mom and 1 Dad fox ( yes the 8 fps is load ) I use a 3.1 KG Nikon AF 300mm f/2.8 + 2x TC Nikon D300 1.5x = shoot @ 900mm

Yes the Elks in Norwegian Forest is Moose @ your N. American home

FAST FACTS
The scientific name for the brown bear is Ursus arctos.

Grizzly bears are actually brown bears, but are often considered a subspecies: Ursus arctos horribilis.

Brown bears are found in northern North America, Europe, and Asia, in isolated areas that are undeveloped by humans.
Brown bear cubs depend on their mother's milk for the first year of life.

In North America, most brown bears live in the western provinces of Canada and in Alaska. Smaller populations live in Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, and Washington.
Male brown bears average about 700 pounds (318 kilograms). Females average about 350 pounds (159 kilograms).

Standing upright on its hind legs, an average-sized male brown bear may reach seven feet (two meters).
When a grizzly bear stands on its hind legs, it is not doing so as a threat. It's curious, trying to get a better view of its surroundings.

Brown bears weigh more right before hibernation than they do at the end of the winter sleep.

Brown bears are often called grizzly bears because the tips of the hair on many of them is grayish, or grizzled.
Large, well-developed shoulder muscles and big, long, strong claws allow the brown bear to dig up roots to eat, rip apart logs for grubs, and hollow out dens for hibernation.

Grizzlies, or brown bears, eat mostly vegetation. They supplement their diets with the meat of animals such as fish and small mammals, when it's available.
Brown bear habitat includes forested mountains, meadows, and river valleys.







quickly:
Polar bears in Norway @ The Svalbard Islands

The Svalbard Islands are located in the Arctic Ocean, halfway between Norway and the North Pole. Here you will find untouched arctic wilderness.

Polar Bears in Svalbard ( 3000 polarbears. 2500 humans. )

The polar bear, Ursus maritimus, is closely related to the brown bear from which it evolved about 200 000-300 000 years ago. Despite the short time since these two species split, the polar bear has under-
gone significant morphological changes in becoming adapted to the specific demands the Arctic environment puts on the animals living there. The most obvious of these adap- tations is the white fur. The beautiful fur was the primary reason this species was hunted from the time of the early explorers, sealers, and whalers, and later – starting around the turn of the last century – by specialized polar bear trappers (see Hunting, Laws and Regu- lations). Population sizes decreased rapidly throughout the world in the 1900s until polar bear harvesting became regulated following the signing of an international treaty in 1973.
Twenty different polar bear populations are recognized throughout the Arctic region. Svalbard’s polar bears occupy the area from Spitsbergen in the west to the Russian ar- chipelagos of Franz Josef Land and Novaya Zemlya in the east. These bears are referred to as the Barents Sea population.
Female polar bears on the east coast of Svalbard display two different movement patterns. Some individuals roam over large areas, ranging from their denning areas in Svalbard across to Russian territory, spend- ing most of their time along the southern lim- its of the Arctic ice hunting for seals. Other individuals have a less energy demanding lifestyle, occupying much smaller home ranges that are restricted to Svalbard and its adjacent waters; these bears have a shorter hunting season.
There is some movement of bears between the Barents Sea population, the eastern Greenland population in the west and the Kara Sea population in the east, but ex- change between these groups is limited. The Barents Sea population probably contains over three thousand polar bears. Approxi- mately half of these bears are located prima- rily on or around the islands of Svalbard. The main denning areas in Svalbard are located on Kong Karl’s Land, Hopen, Edgeøya and Nordaustlandet. The tiny island of Kongsøya has the highest recorded density of polar bear dens in the world: in 1980 at Bogen on Kongsøya there were 12 dens per km2 and
in August 1984, 168 bears were observed on the island!


Per



Jun 09, 2012 at 02:42 PM
Lothen
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p.1 #19 · p.1 #19 · - Common animals in Norway -


mike717 wrote:
Nicely done Per, lovely captures!

Mike



Thanks Mike, appreciate it

Per



Jun 09, 2012 at 03:15 PM
KCollett
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p.1 #20 · p.1 #20 · - Common animals in Norway -


Thank you for the useful information and the great set of fox images Per!


Jun 09, 2012 at 04:09 PM
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