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Archive 2012 · Why Tiff?
  
 
ckcarr
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p.1 #1 · Why Tiff?


Stupid question perhaps, but since I shoot just landscapes in raw I have wondered this.

Why does Nikon have the tiff option? What genre uses this primarily? And if so, why can tiffs not be used in the dual card system? Or why can you not shoot a raw + tiff, or tiff + jpeg?

Just curious...



May 13, 2012 at 03:46 PM
Zebrabot
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p.1 #2 · Why Tiff?


I've wondered about this too. It seems like a 1990s digital camera holdover.


May 13, 2012 at 04:23 PM
CGrindahl
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p.1 #3 · Why Tiff?


Clearly, you have too much time on your hands...


May 13, 2012 at 04:28 PM
Jammy Straub
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p.1 #4 · Why Tiff?


There's no good reason.

It's just another option for the sake of having options. If you want a higher quality file than JPG can provide but are scared to death of RAW files tiff might be for you... maybe...



May 13, 2012 at 04:35 PM
ckcarr
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p.1 #5 · Why Tiff?


I thought I was missing something important! A breakthrough!


May 13, 2012 at 04:41 PM
river rover
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p.1 #6 · Why Tiff?


I come from a print and design background and TIFF and EPS were the standard for high quality printing for a long time. The TIFF file can support Layers and 16 bit format, so if you want to stick with one format throughout workflow TiFF might be a good option. TIFF out of Camera into LR, Aperture, Into Photoshop for layer masks etc and out to print. Not saying it's the best workflow but it keeps the entire method in one file format.


May 13, 2012 at 04:53 PM
utildayael
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p.1 #7 · Why Tiff?


^^ This

But ya its basically a holdover. It could be useful in certain workflows but most folks do RAW and then convert to whatever output format they need in the end.

That said... if you shoot RAW into Lightroom and edit in Photoshop you're stuck with PSD or TIFF as output if you want to keep layers and technically are keeping both the RAW NEF file + the PSD or TIFF which takes up more space. Shooting TIFF-only would be the one same file the whole process. Doesn't really justify it but it could be plausible. [or you can just nuke the NEF when you're done with it]

In short. You aint missing anything. You might use TIFF as an output format to go to the printer if you're shooting in RAW.



May 13, 2012 at 05:17 PM
rattymouse
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p.1 #8 · Why Tiff?


utildayael wrote:
^^ This

But ya its basically a holdover. It could be useful in certain workflows but most folks do RAW and then convert to whatever output format they need in the end.

That said... if you shoot RAW into Lightroom and edit in Photoshop you're stuck with PSD or TIFF as output if you want to keep layers and technically are keeping both the RAW NEF file + the PSD or TIFF which takes up more space. Shooting TIFF-only would be the one same file the whole process. Doesn't really justify it but it could be plausible. [or you can just nuke
...Show more

With the RAW file in Lightroom, you always have the untouched original file. If you shoot just TIFF *AND* export that into Photoshop, you have lost your original. To preserve that you would have to export a second copy of the TIFF file, which kind of defeats the whole purpose.




May 14, 2012 at 02:14 AM
Gregg B.
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p.1 #9 · Why Tiff?




With the RAW file in Lightroom, you always have the untouched original file. If you shoot just TIFF *AND* export that into Photoshop, you have lost your original. To preserve that you would have to export a second copy of the TIFF file, which kind of defeats the whole purpose.



Not true!
It doesn't work that way. Lightroom let you edit file in Photoshop, or something else, but it always asks if you want to edit original, copy, or copy with Lightroom changes you made so far.
So your second sentence is completely untrue. Actually all you wrote is just made up crap.
I can see you don't know yet how Lightroom works...




May 14, 2012 at 07:43 AM
Peter Figen
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p.1 #10 · Why Tiff?


I remember using some ancient digital camera years ago that only had the option of jpeg or tiff, no raw. The tiff took about 45 seconds to write after every frame, as the camera itself was converting its internal raw to tif and then writing it to the card. There is absolutely no reason at all to do this anymore if you're going to shoot raw files. Raw files are smaller, faster and can be processed in many different ways over and over for the best results. Whatever tiff you end up with in camera is going to be pre-cooked and may never be really right for anything. It is indeed a very weird option in this day and age.


May 14, 2012 at 08:10 AM
 

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AlephOne
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p.1 #11 · Why Tiff?


I thought that Nikon retained TIFF because there were a few vocal shooters who wanted it, and it was close to zero cost to leave it in?

You don't have to use it (just like JPEG ).



May 14, 2012 at 08:29 AM
Grognard
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p.1 #12 · Why Tiff?


I save everything after working on it in Photoshop as a TIFF file. That is because it can be viewed and printed anywhere.


May 14, 2012 at 12:00 PM
John Passaneau
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p.1 #13 · Why Tiff?


I use TIFF because it's a universal non compressed or loss-less compressed if you chose, file type. Every photo editor can read TIFF's every cataloging software can read TIFF's. It can handle layers, 16bit data. It's the one universal high quality file type that is common to just about everything. I think that it's the best format for archiving my images.
What more can you ask from a file type?



May 14, 2012 at 12:33 PM
rattymouse
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p.1 #14 · Why Tiff?


Gregg B. wrote:
Not true!
It doesn't work that way. Lightroom let you edit file in Photoshop, or something else, but it always asks if you want to edit original, copy, or copy with Lightroom changes you made so far.
So your second sentence is completely untrue. Actually all you wrote is just made up crap.
I can see you don't know yet how Lightroom works...



YOU need to learn how to read. I have been using Lightroom since version 1.0 was beta. I know exactly how it operates and correctly denoted so above. READ the whole statement. With working on a TIFF in photoshop, you are either working on the original OR a copy. An original TIFF file gets you no benefit over shooting RAW in terms of storage space. THAT was my point.

Grow up.






May 14, 2012 at 12:40 PM
Steve Beck
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p.1 #15 · Why Tiff?


You can't straight to print with a 16bit tiff which is better than a 8bit jpg. Raw is my choice it you always have to convert first.


May 14, 2012 at 01:14 PM
acarlay
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p.1 #16 · Why Tiff?


TIFF is too large a file size to store/archive if there are no layers involved. Better to use jpeg uncompressed with highest quality setting. You can always go from jpeg back to TIFF.


May 14, 2012 at 01:20 PM
river rover
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p.1 #17 · Why Tiff?


A bit confused here. I didn't realize there was such a thing as an uncompressed JPEG. I thought the jpeg format was by definition was compressed. If I'm archiving I tend to zip the LZW TIFFs which may be a bit redundant but hey... If I decide to re-edit at a later date I can be assured that the file will open in pretty much whatever I've got handy and I'll have the full 16 bit info to work on? Am I missing something?


-Edit.-

OK brain dumped on JPEG LS format and forgot completely. Getting old.



May 14, 2012 at 02:16 PM
galenapass
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p.1 #18 · Why Tiff?


Gregg B. wrote:
Not true!
It doesn't work that way. Lightroom let you edit file in Photoshop, or something else, but it always asks if you want to edit original, copy, or copy with Lightroom changes you made so far.
So your second sentence is completely untrue. Actually all you wrote is just made up crap.
I can see you don't know yet how Lightroom works...



Whoa! Hold on there. Before you go making more of fool of yourself than you already have, you need to read what was written.

Edit - OK, I see that Rmouse has also responded.



May 14, 2012 at 03:34 PM
Gregg B.
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p.1 #19 · Why Tiff?


rattymouse wrote:
YOU need to learn how to read. I have been using Lightroom since version 1.0 was beta. I know exactly how it operates and correctly denoted so above. READ the whole statement. With working on a TIFF in photoshop, you are either working on the original OR a copy. An original TIFF file gets you no benefit over shooting RAW in terms of storage space. THAT was my point.

Grow up



Again, untrue. Everything you wore is still not true. You want me to read it again?
OK let's break it down.
You said:
1. With the RAW file in Lightroom, you always have the untouched original file.
Untrue. If you edit that file in external editor like Capture NX (easy to set it up in LR) you will edit original.
And, you'll 'touch' it.

2. If you shoot just TIFF *AND* export that into Photoshop, you have lost your original.
Untrue. Only if you edit original you will loose it. It doesn't matter whether the file was saved in TIFF or something else. The originator of this post asked about benefit of saving in TIFF format. I get what you trying to say but for someone that doesn't know LR that well, such info can be misleading.

3.To preserve that you would have to export a second copy of the TIFF file, which kind of defeats the whole purpose.
I have no clue what you trying say by that so I'm not going to even try to comment on that.

s

Edited on May 14, 2012 at 09:08 PM · View previous versions



May 14, 2012 at 06:38 PM
williamkazak
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p.1 #20 · Why Tiff?


All of the above, pushed to the side, shooting in TIFF is a bummer because of the slower write speed and the size increase (over RAW). Correct?


May 14, 2012 at 06:52 PM
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