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Archive 2012 · Help with slide scanning
  
 
HawksFan66
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p.1 #1 · Help with slide scanning


I have posted this question on a couple other forums without much luck. I am hoping that a few here will be able to help me out.

Have any of you used a service to have your old slides scanned? I don't have a huge number of slides. If I did I'd probably look into buying a quality slide scanner. The ones I've found that seem to be good quality run a minimum of about $350. Slide scanning services seem to run around $0.20/slide.

I'd appreciate any input and help you can give.



Apr 09, 2012 at 10:25 PM
Jeffrey
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p.1 #2 · Help with slide scanning


Moved to the correct forum. Hope you get your answer here.


Apr 09, 2012 at 10:32 PM
papageno
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p.1 #3 · Help with slide scanning


I prefer a scanner. More bit depth, better control, no handling by minimum wage serfs.


Apr 10, 2012 at 03:55 AM
dmacmillan
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p.1 #4 · Help with slide scanning


A quick Google came up with http://www.slidescanning.com/slide-scanning.htm.

There are also others. I chose this one because you can choose the DPI of the scan. What do you plan to do with the scans? If you're just planning on a slideshow or viewing on the computer you can save space with smaller scans, like their 200DPI. I suggest you send them some for sample scanning. Choose a good outdoor slide, well exposed with a lot of range and get them to scan it at all DPI's they offer. You can then get a feeel for what you need. You might also want to find out if they use dust suppression. If they do, be aware it will work on Ektachrome slides but not Kodachrome.



Apr 10, 2012 at 01:14 PM
aubsxc
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p.1 #5 · Help with slide scanning


I have used James Beck Digital for drum scans of some of my 4x5 chromes and he has produced quality results. He also does drum scans on 24x36 chromes and occasionally runs specials ($10 to $12 per slide). I use my Nikon Coolscan 9000ED for all my 35mm slides and it works well once you have it set up right. However, Nikon stopped making scanners a couple of years ago and you would be lucky to find one today at a reasonable price.

High quality, personalized scanning gets expensive in a hurry. If you don't need the best quality available you can use a number of online services who offer varying prices (anywhere from $0.25 to $3.00 per slide) with quality that varies accordingly. Some of the less expensive places will ship your slides to places like India where labour is less expensive, so ask before you try.



Apr 10, 2012 at 05:01 PM
HawksFan66
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p.1 #6 · Help with slide scanning


Thanks for the information guys.


Apr 10, 2012 at 10:43 PM
 

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skibum5
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p.1 #7 · Help with slide scanning


HawksFan66 wrote:
I have posted this question on a couple other forums without much luck. I am hoping that a few here will be able to help me out.

Have any of you used a service to have your old slides scanned? I don't have a huge number of slides. If I did I'd probably look into buying a quality slide scanner. The ones I've found that seem to be good quality run a minimum of about $350. Slide scanning services seem to run around $0.20/slide.

I'd appreciate any input and help you can give.


I use a Nikon 9000 but it is more like $2000 than $300 (i was lucky to even nab one a couple years ago, for a while B&H would get a brand new copy in for list price, just one or two copies every 3-5 months or so and one day I managed to nab one in time, they tended to sell out on day of arrival in stock, it's quite possible there last trickling supply chains have run out for good now, not sure)

It's diffused lighting makes it do a better job than the low end coolscans, it doesn't over emphasize scratches,emulsion bubbles or grain quite as much and it also doesn't have the light flare where a bright sky next to a dark horizon has the light leak into teh horizon like with the coolscan v. it also has auto dirt removal that actually works with kodachrome slides (most hardware IR direct removal doesn't work with kodachrome).

it's a slow, tedious process, but the results are pretty good (wet mounting would make them reallly good, although i suppose nothing quite matches a top end drum scan)

silverfast and vuescan make software that is better than manufacturer provided software

i don't know what they best options are at $350, i didn't look into that much

I don't have many samples online:






flare test:

coolscan v:





vs 9000:






grain/bubbles/dirt with no IR auto dirt removal (doesn't work on v anyway) test:
coolscan v:





9000:







Apr 11, 2012 at 05:53 AM
Alan321
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p.1 #8 · Help with slide scanning


Good slide scanning gobbles up time and I can't see much effort being put into each one at 20 cents each.

Consider this basic question to guide your approach: Are you (1) scanning them to help decide which ones are worth keeping, or (2) have you already decided which ones are worth keeping and now need a good scan to carry on with ?

Option (1) lets you get away with cheap scans at first but you'll want to re-scan the good slides later on at more cost per slide (more resolution, more control of tone and colours, etc.). The main complication is relating the scan image file to the original slide later on - i.e. being able to find that slide you like so much in amongst the bundles of slides. How are the scans identified and how are the slides identified ?

Option (2) almost certainly means more than 20 cents each but you will probably never need to rescan. What you spend in time and effort (and dollars) for scanning may be offset by you not having to spend so much time and effort identifying and filing your slides in a way that allows specific slides to be found for rescanning later on.

My own efforts died a long time ago but will eventually be resurrected. However, it seemed that 10 minutes per slide was needed to compensate for variations in films and exposures and the ravages of time and physical distortion and damage (including dust), and to provide something as useful as a modern high-res digital camera image file for further editing and perhaps printing.

My first slide scanner gave crappy results even at 1900 dpi. My Nikon slide scanner was much better (and then also much dearer than it became a few years later) but is no longer supported by Nikon. The optics within the scanner make a difference.

- Alan



Apr 12, 2012 at 08:30 AM
Alan321
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p.1 #9 · Help with slide scanning


Skibum mentioned the infrared auto dirt removal (part of a feature set often known as ICE). It's a great feature to look for as it works in ways that Ps and such cannot because it's a software/hardware combination rather than just software, but it probably will not work on most kodachrome slides because of the 3D structure in that film (variations in film thickness get mistaken for defects that need to be corrected). Pity.

- Alan



Apr 12, 2012 at 08:37 AM
Peter Figen
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p.1 #10 · Help with slide scanning


You might consider buying a used Nikon 8000 or 9000 to scan what you need and then sell it when you're done. The scans from those scanners are the closest I've seen to real drum scans and are quite nice. There is no way you're going to get decent scans for pennies a piece. Just ain't gonna happen. Scanning is not for automated monkeys pushing buttons for treats. It requires some thoughtful human intervention to get it done right, and if it's not done right, what's the point anyway.

As far as cleanliness goes, I use PEC-12 to clean each piece of film and if you can wet mount, the scans will both be sharper and have even less dust than if you don't wet mount. There are kits available for the Nikon scanners. The posted crops with dust are really filthy and you shouldn't normally be seeing anything that bad, but you can get film that has been badly stored or film that was washed in dirty water with dirt embedded in the emulsion that can be a a problem. The cleanup time for 4000 ppi scans from my drum scanner are about five minutes a scan and probably double that for 8000 ppi scans. The time saving from good cleaning and wet mounting are worth the extra effort.



Apr 12, 2012 at 09:35 AM
skibum5
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p.1 #11 · Help with slide scanning


Alan321 wrote:
Skibum mentioned the infrared auto dirt removal (part of a feature set often known as ICE). It's a great feature to look for as it works in ways that Ps and such cannot because it's a software/hardware combination rather than just software, but it probably will not work on most kodachrome slides because of the 3D structure in that film (variations in film thickness get mistaken for defects that need to be corrected). Pity.

- Alan


it does work on kodachrome if you use a Nikon 9000 though, but that it is probably about it



Apr 13, 2012 at 02:56 AM
skibum5
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p.1 #12 · Help with slide scanning


Peter Figen wrote:
You might consider buying a used Nikon 8000 or 9000 to scan what you need and then sell it when you're done. The scans from those scanners are the closest I've seen to real drum scans and are quite nice. There is no way you're going to get decent scans for pennies a piece. Just ain't gonna happen. Scanning is not for automated monkeys pushing buttons for treats. It requires some thoughtful human intervention to get it done right, and if it's not done right, what's the point anyway.

As far as cleanliness goes, I use PEC-12 to clean
...Show more

yeah those crops were not typical (but are comparatively, the 9000 always shows less grains and bubbles and dust than the V and less flaring), the very first scans I made, just using built in software, no dust removal, didn't fine tune sharpening, a slide that had been sittin gin the open, etc.



Apr 13, 2012 at 02:58 AM





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