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Archive 2012 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy
  
 
jaytred
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p.1 #1 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


is this just dodging n burning stuff or is there another way to achieve this? If so, how?

Heres some examples:














Thx!



Apr 06, 2012 at 04:57 AM
15Bit
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p.1 #2 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


Personally i think those look creepy and slightly demonic.



Apr 06, 2012 at 07:50 AM
Eyeball
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p.1 #3 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


As you can see by looking at the eyes, one of the main things that makes the eyes liven up and look "glassy" are the catchlights - those bits of almost-white that are reflections of light sources whether they be studio lights, a reflector card, the sky, or whatever.

Usually the best solution is to light the subjects so those catchlights occur naturally but you can also apply catchlights in Photoshop or Lightroom. It can be as simple as placing a little white oval at the same place in both eyes and then adjusting opacity and blur.

David Cuerdon has a class on Kelby Training that includes a whole set of catchlight brushes you can download, including complicated ones like sky/cloud reflections.

As a side note, you should not embed photos that are not yours in these threads for two reasons:
- It confuses viewers who assume that the images are yours.
- You are using the other photographer's web site bandwidth without actually visiting his or her site.

Just use the hyperlink button on the left side of the message post area and reference the site with a link rather than embedding the image.

If the images are your own, you can embed the images (and this is actually preferred so that FM members don't need to click to see your images).



Apr 06, 2012 at 11:43 AM
Monito
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p.1 #4 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


Look up the meaning of "glassy-eyed" and see if it is an impression you really want to convey to the viewer!

As far as giving eyes a little more vitality goes, you can use a layer that is set to Soft Light mode and when you create it choose the 50% gray option. At 50% gray, there is no change to the image. But if you lighten it a little in one area such as a crescent in the lower part of the iris of the eye, then the image perks up there. You can lighten cheeks a little in the Soft Light layer and they will seem to come forward a bit, enhancing cheekbone structure. Areas that you want to recede a bit can be darkened slightly in the Soft Light area.

On side note, how appropriate that a member called Eyeball should respond to this thread!



Apr 06, 2012 at 01:19 PM
Alan321
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p.1 #5 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


dodging, burning, localized sharpening (or softening elswhere), localized contrast, adding catchlights, etc., etc. Lots of ways to do it but you can just easily get it wrong. e.g. make sure the catchlights are not coming from different directions on different eyes. Don't make it too fake.

Which software are you using ? There's sure to be how-to tips on the web for each program.

- Alan



Apr 06, 2012 at 03:00 PM
jaytred
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p.1 #6 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


Oh sorry didn't know about putting links in my posts. I didn't save the pic andupload myself. So the links still lead to their site. I can understand the bandwidth issue though. If its the rules I will follow them next time. And thx for everyones help! If anyones got something to add please add!

I use lightroom 3.3 and then photoshop after if need.



Apr 06, 2012 at 03:41 PM
Zaitz
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p.1 #7 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


http://www.destriandorf.com/?p=520


Apr 07, 2012 at 12:55 AM
RustyBug
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p.1 #8 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


+1 @ 15Bit ... those examples seem a bit over the top to me ... so do be judicious in your applications, whichever techniques you choose to employ.


Apr 07, 2012 at 01:06 AM
DigMeTX
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p.1 #9 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


The first step IMO is not getting the catchlights themselves but the source of the catchlight. Getting the eyes well-lit is the main thing and catchlights typically go along with that. I just use the iris enhance brush in LR (and sometimes adjust a slider a bit more or less). Experiment with the density and flow to see what looks the best. If the eyes were well-lit when the photo was taken then you really don't have to do much more.

brad



Apr 08, 2012 at 09:08 PM
 

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cgardner
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p.1 #10 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


The light sources and anything else bright and reflective, such as a reflector used for fill, will be seen reflected in on the round, wet eye ball.

Since there is only one sun a single round catchlight is most natural and that's what I prefer. When I use centered fill for portraits I'll retouch and remove the catchlight from the fill in the center of the pupil leaving only the key light catchlight.



Apr 09, 2012 at 10:50 PM
DigMeTX
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p.1 #11 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


cgardner wrote:
Since there is only one sun a single round catchlight is most natural and that's what I prefer.


I don't know that I've ever seen a catchlight in someone's eye that was just the round sun. Usually in natural light the entire sky creates a catchlight and it's not round from my experience. You would have to have someone basically looking into the sun and the rest of the sky fairly dim to get a single round sun catchlight, right? I have no problem with anyone wanting a single round catchlight and it's pretty popular with studio lighting but I don't think the rest of the statement is accurate.



Apr 10, 2012 at 01:18 AM
cgardner
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p.1 #12 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


Granted, potraits aren't typically shot in sun.





But in person we don't as a rule pay much attention to catchlights in eyes as we do in still photos either. The sun creates specular highlights on many other rounded reflective objects besides eyes which create a perceptual baseline.

The eyes reflect the source. I like round catchlights so I use a circle mask on my rectangular SB. YMMV.



DigMeTX wrote:
I don't know that I've ever seen a catchlight in someone's eye that was just the round sun. Usually in natural light the entire sky creates a catchlight and it's not round from my experience. You would have to have someone basically looking into the sun and the rest of the sky fairly dim to get a single round sun catchlight, right? I have no problem with anyone wanting a single round catchlight and it's pretty popular with studio lighting but I don't think the rest of the statement is accurate.




Apr 10, 2012 at 02:23 AM
DubiousDrewski
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p.1 #13 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


cgardner wrote:
Since there is only one sun a single round catchlight is most natural


I have to respectfully, but completely disagree. Who takes a portrait with the sun in someone's face? Nearly no one, so you will actually very rarely see round, sun-shaped catch lights. The main source of light in a portrait is almost always some large lit surface, which will usually be any possible shape BUT a single round spot.

I used to enhance catch lights in my portraits, but I do it rarely and only subtly these days. I try to avoid the obviously photoshopped look that the OP's photos exhibit. While I do enjoy a clean photo, as I get older, I begin to LOATHE the photoshop look on people.



Apr 10, 2012 at 03:42 PM
cgardner
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p.1 #14 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


Like I also said the eyes will reflect anything bright you put around the camera back into the lens. If a square, rectangular, circular, octogon, hexigon, etc. the catchlight will be similar shape and relative size. Point being you can often, not always, control what they look like according to your preferences. If you don't like round catchlights don't use round sources. Simple as that.


Apr 10, 2012 at 06:59 PM
DigMeTX
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p.1 #15 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


I don't think anyone has any problem with that. It's just the statement that it's the most natural because there is only one round sun. I don't think anyone cares about what shape of catchlight you prefer.

brad



Apr 10, 2012 at 07:13 PM
Tom D
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p.1 #16 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


Gotta agree with Drewski, as his observations are right in line with my own theories and taste on this subject. The reflection of an open window would seem more natural to me. Pretty much any daylight-lit shape works, as that's exactly what the eyes reflect all day long.

Additionally, eyes tend to be super-sensitive to any editing moves. Meaning, a little goes a long way. It seems to work well for me to just use judicious brightening and sharpening moves, with an occasional (and equally judicious) enhancement of color.



Apr 10, 2012 at 08:34 PM
DigMeTX
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p.1 #17 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


Tom D wrote:
Additionally, eyes tend to be super-sensitive to any editing moves. Meaning, a little goes a long way. It seems to work well for me to just use judicious brightening and sharpening moves, with an occasional (and equally judicious) enhancement of color.


Getting back to the subject this is a very good point. It can go south quickly if you get heavy-handed.

brad



Apr 10, 2012 at 08:44 PM
DubiousDrewski
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p.1 #18 · making eyes stand out more and look glassy


Well, I completely forgot to be helpful and answer Jay's original question. How do you make catch lights look like that? Here's my favourite way:

Make a levels or curves layer on top of your image layer. I hate levels and only ever use curves, but it works for both. Circled in red, you can see the handles for blacks, midtones, and whites, respectively.






(Note: a curves layer won't have a midtone handle. That's okay.)

Take both the left handle and the right handle and move each one inward toward the middle. This will dramatically increase your contrast on the whole image and it will look terrible, but don't worry. Ignore the rest of the photo and just make the eyes look the way you want. After that, invert the layer mask from white to black, so that nothing from the curves layer shows through. Now we take a small, soft brush with low opacity and we paint the layer back in slowly on to the eyes.

Do it subtly enough and no one will ever know you used it! Example:





You'd never guess that in this image, I used this method to crush tones in the hair in order to accentuate the highlights, as well as on her eyes, to make the catch lights punch harder.

Important tip: Crushing your tones like this will increase the saturation to unnatural levels, which might make the eyes look demonic. To fix this, simply change your level's blending mode from "normal" to "luminosity". This will make it so your levels/curves layer will affect brightness without screwing with your saturation.

If you're patient enough, this is a very powerful method of selectively modifying contrast in controlled sections of your image. I admit to using it now and then even today - especially on my landscape photos.



Apr 10, 2012 at 11:15 PM





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