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Archive 2012 · Monolights--Anyone Hear of Injuries?
  
 
Two23
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Monolights--Anyone Hear of Injuries?


I have a pile of WL X3200 big studio strobes, and use them only outdoors in all kinds of conditions. I know they hae a LOT of power stored in those four big capacitators, but have not had any incidents. I use good sense though. I know they have the ability to kill someone, but has anyone here ever heard of someone getting really zapped by these big monolights? Any confirmed serious injuries or people being killed? Just curious.


Kent in SD



Apr 01, 2012 at 02:01 AM
alohadave
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Monolights--Anyone Hear of Injuries?


Don't disassemble them and you'll be fine.


Apr 01, 2012 at 03:28 AM
aborr
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Monolights--Anyone Hear of Injuries?


I've never heard of any issues with monolights. The 'nasty bits' are pretty well shielded from users. But, with pack and head systems, worn or damaged head cables and connectors can be a shock/fire hazard.

The main hazard from big strobes is probably flying glass from an exploding flash tube. Most big studio units can be equipped with a glass dome or other protective shield that that covers the flash tube and modeling light. This is useful when you have a "bare" reflector close to, and aimed directly at, a subject. This is mainly an issue with higher power systems, but even low power monolights from Profoto have built-in glass shields, and Elinchrom sells optional glass domes for theirs.

Sports shooters who put big strobes overhead in basketball arenas, etc, usually put (ventilated) clear lexan safety shields over their reflectors to protect the players and fans from possible falling/flying glass.



Apr 01, 2012 at 05:25 AM
cgardner
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Monolights--Anyone Hear of Injuries?


The worst case scenario I ever recall reading was someone's WL1600 with a capacitor failure which dumped black goo over the white marble floor of a client's house. I suspect the bigger risk is someone knocking the light over or the head falling off the stand and hitting someone.

The latter happened to me once when shooting a wedding with old Graflex speedlights. Someone bumped into the off-camera light and knocked the flash head off, hitting a person seated below it at a wedding reception. Fortunately it was light enough there wasn't any injury and it happened long ago before people put their personal injury lawyer's number on their speed dial.

You'd need to be crazy today to shoot for hire without a good all-risks insurance policy, both for personal / property injury and professional performance.



Apr 01, 2012 at 01:11 PM
 

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williamkazak
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Monolights--Anyone Hear of Injuries?


Back in the day, when I was in the studio as an assistant, Balcar came out with shielded flash tubes. Everyone liked the idea because the models became our friends and we did not want to see anyone hurt with flying glass from a broken flash tube. That is still a great idea today. Never mess with a flash capacitor. Why would you want to? I use serious Manfrotto air cushioned lightstands on wheels at events. If someone bumps into them, the stand slides away.


Apr 01, 2012 at 05:27 PM
Two23
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Monolights--Anyone Hear of Injuries?


I use my WL X3200 monoligts and Vagabond batteries exclusively outdoors, often out in the snow. Sometimes it rains a little while I'm out there too. I once had five lights in the air and four them shut down one by one during a sleet storm. The lights, battery, and power cable can become wet with dew as fog develops sometimes. I also set the strobes up in kayaks, anchored to the river bottom as floating lighting platforms. Just curious if anyone has heard of someone getting shocked doing this sort of thing. Apparently those doing it are using enough common sense to avoid it. You wouldn't believe the conditions I shoot in during winter nights in the Dakotas.


Kent in SD



Apr 03, 2012 at 04:14 AM
cwebster
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Monolights--Anyone Hear of Injuries?


Two23 wrote:
I use my WL X3200 monoligts and Vagabond batteries exclusively outdoors, often out in the snow. Sometimes it rains a little while I'm out there too. I once had five lights in the air and four them shut down one by one during a sleet storm. The lights, battery, and power cable can become wet with dew as fog develops sometimes. I also set the strobes up in kayaks, anchored to the river bottom as floating lighting platforms. Just curious if anyone has heard of someone getting shocked doing this sort of thing. Apparently those doing it are using enough
...Show more

Under those conditions, no piece of electrical equipment is completely safe.

If you are concerned about safety, don't use high voltage electrical equipment around water.

<Chas>



Apr 03, 2012 at 06:04 PM
hondageek
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Monolights--Anyone Hear of Injuries?


I was at Calumet in Cambridge, MA and the salesperson was trying to show me how easy it was to change the modeling bulb in one of their house brand strobes. He pinched the bulb too hard and it exploded in my face. That's the only monolight indecent I've ever experienced.


Apr 04, 2012 at 11:25 PM





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