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Archive 2012 · Studio Window/Door Light
  
 
AIBlackberry
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Studio Window/Door Light


Does anyone have or created an artifical window/door back drop with a door/window and a studio light? My shooting room doesn't have access to a good window so I need to create a "fake" door/window. Does anyone have suggestions from experience they have on this idea. I'm thinking of using french doors so I can use for full lengths. Maybe I can find french doors that are not functionally at a cheap price and drape with studio through the back side of the door. Please give any advise or ideas you may have. If you have pictures of your set-up that would be even better. Thanks in advance


Mar 30, 2012 at 12:34 AM
hugowolf
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Studio Window/Door Light


Is there some reason why a large softbox, scrim, or diffusion fabric wouldn’t work for you?

Brian A



Mar 30, 2012 at 03:29 AM
cgardner
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Studio Window/Door Light


You are thinking too literally. A SB the size of a window will produce the same character of light as a north facing window. If you are looking for grid pattern of a small pane window the trick is to make a grid out of wood and place it between the SB and the subject, not directly on the face of the SB where the light will just wrap arould it.

That use of "go betweens" or GOBOs is very common in filmaking. Put a light in the corner of the room with a potted plant in front of it and the dappled pattern of lighting it create will look like outdoor light filtered through trees.

If you literally want to create a set with a window or door you might want to look for a company that recycles and sells fixtures from out houses rather than new ones.



Mar 30, 2012 at 12:13 PM
JBPhotog
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Studio Window/Door Light


Done this many times when the door/window needed to be in the shot. Hope you are handy with tools because you are essentially building a room set. You'll need to finish off moulding and trim in order to make it look real but instead of using 2x4 lumber and drywall for the walls you can use 1x4 and flat panelling. 4 foot wide by 8 feet tall sections boxed with a couple of horizontal 1x4 supports will provide enough rigidity to look like a wall. An L shaped brace which has a 45 degree cross piece sticks out the back and is held down on the floor with sand bags. A few of these panels C-clamped together can make your room larger.

If want to attach drafting paper to the outside surface of the window you can but in most cases a light modifier is used behind the window opening, this give you more control if you want a sunny hard light effect.

If you don't need to see the window, you just saved yourself a weekend of trips to the lumber shop and just use whatever modifier you want for the look you are after.



Mar 30, 2012 at 06:38 PM
AIBlackberry
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Studio Window/Door Light


Thank you guys for the input. I love to hear all different views in this forum. So again I say Thank you. I am trying to create a "room set" for a backdrop. My concept is an L shaped wall, the door on one plane and a faux wall on the other plane. Of course the light would pop through the back of the door. With a nice window treatment on the door I believe this would be a great backdrop for brides, babies and maternity portraits. I hope this explains my idea alittle better. If anyone has any ideas please chime in


Mar 31, 2012 at 12:58 AM
 

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BrianO
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Studio Window/Door Light


JBPhotog summed it up well; build it like a stage set. You use the same methods as if building an actual wall for a home, but since it's not load bearing you can use lighter-weight materials. You can also build it on a moveable platform with casters so you can move it around in the studio.

Your local library may have books on set-building, or be able to get some through an inter-library loan. A large hardware store like Lowe's or Home Depot should also have some books on basic construction methods.



Mar 31, 2012 at 01:07 AM
nolaguy
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Studio Window/Door Light


One FMer posted several threads illustrating his handling of a faux window/light with diagrams of the set up. I don't think it's precisely what you have in mind - it was more direct backlighting made to look like a window (via chiffon, drapes etc) - but interesting none the less and you may find his diagrams/detail informative.

Sorry, I don't recall his name but it was within the last year and probably on the Lighting forum if you care to dig around for it.



Mar 31, 2012 at 11:10 PM
Skarkowtsky
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Studio Window/Door Light


Sounds like you want to build a window flat and a door flat. More common in the film and tv industry, but I've seen them on set in photo studios. The rental house I worked at in NYC rents them for a hefty day rate.

Needed:

4x8 ply for the wall
2x4 to frame one side (all 4 sides), plus cross pieces for support.
additional 2x4's for the jack (the leg that holds the wall up)
the jack is essentially and right-angle triangle that you screw into the back of the wall flat (into one of the framing 2x4's on the back side
toss a sandbag over the jack to secure it.

You can fake a door, or hang an actual functioning door.
Same with windows. I've worked with functioning fake windows (no panes of glass or plexi), just the moldings, and I've worked with real windows (too heavy).

Adding floor molding, window molding and other details finishes it off.

Good luck!

Typical Wall Flat, note the jack behind:
http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m168/jl122/6597aa62.jpg

Window Flat:
http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m168/jl122/windowinflat.jpg



Apr 03, 2012 at 03:22 PM
AIBlackberry
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Studio Window/Door Light


Thank you Skarkowtsky,this is what I was looking for. I like the window but believe I would like to have a set of french doors. In your opinion is there anything I need to know when photographing using these sets?


Apr 04, 2012 at 12:09 AM
Skarkowtsky
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Studio Window/Door Light


Nothing that comes to mind other than building them to a solid, strong finish, especially if they surround an intricate set or live models. Don't want them crashing down and seriously hurting anyone.

Other than that, you can paint, wallpaper or decorate them to your liking, and light them as you would any actual wall. This thread just reminded me of cinematography class in college: we had to achieve three different exposures on one wall flat, with one 2K Mole Richardson. Talk about C-stands--they were flying everywhere with scrims and flags, haha. What a challenge!

Give me a day, I drew-up diagrams for wall jacks in the studio I work in. I'll send them your way.



Apr 04, 2012 at 12:28 AM





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