Home · Register · Search · View Winners · Software · Hosting · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Photo Critique | Join Upload & Sell

  

Archive 2012 · Silk & Sun
  
 
RustyBug
Online
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #1 · Silk & Sun


Playing with some backlighting ...













Feb 24, 2012 at 02:34 AM
cgardner
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #2 · Silk & Sun


First is quite nicely composed, but then fake flower arrangements usually are

Fake flowers in a real setting very clever. From the context you assume they are real initially until looking at them closely.

The POV in the second doesn't create the same unified composition and the fact the flowers are artificial is more apparent because it lacks the background context seen in the first.

What did you use for fill in front?



Feb 24, 2012 at 03:32 AM
RustyBug
Online
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #3 · Silk & Sun


Chuck ... you'll likely appreciate this one.

The first one is using a broken piece of flourescent lighting diffusion I bowed as an arched/psuedo parabolic reflector.

The second one is the same piece used as both a diffuser & reflector (curled around to the side). I was mostly interested to see how it could handle the sun as both a diffuser and reflector and as a psuedo seamless ... just another one of my "test" shots.

Comps aren't as of much interest as was the "quality" of light that I could generate. It isn't without its issues, as there are definitely some "speckled" hot spots that the intense specular sun generated with it. It is likely better suited for something not quite a specular as the sun. I put CS5 (new today) to the test with some content aware / proximity healing for some of the more prominent speckling areas.

BTW ... you probably need to replace "clever" with "lazy" ... I just stopped by a cemetery prompted by Greg's recent post. Literally, out the door right after I saw his.

Edited on Feb 22, 2013 at 07:34 PM · View previous versions



Feb 24, 2012 at 03:58 AM
cgardner
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #4 · Silk & Sun


RustyBug wrote:
Chuck ... you'll likely appreciate this one.

The first one is using a broken piece of flourescent lighting diffusion I bowed as an arched/psuedo parabolic reflector.

The second one is the same piece used as both a diffuser & reflector (curled around to the side). I was mostly interested to see how it could handle the sun as both a diffuser and reflector and as a psuedo seamless ... just another one of my "test" shots. Comps aren't as of much interest as was the "quality" of light that I could generate.



I suspected some sort of reflector was used. The specularity on the shadows is similar to what I see when using a shiny silver Larsen Reflectasol folding reflector..







They are pricely but built like tanks and very convenient folding compactly like an umbrella.

RustyBug wrote:
It isn't without its issues, as there are definitely some "speckled" hot spots that are generated by it. It was fun to play with, but not something that I'd deem as reliable. I put CS5 (new today) to the test with some content aware / proximity healing for some of the more prominent speckling areas.


In this case I didn't find the specularity objectionable because you'd expect to see it on real leaves or any smooth object. Here it makes the fake leaves seem more real.

As a general rule of thumb to using smaller "hard" (collimated) sources for soft textured objects and diffused, larger "softer" ones for smooth and glossy surfaces will result in the most realistic texture in the photo.

The AA filter over the sensor mushed up the micro-specularity that gives seen-by-eye more "sparkle and pop" than the camera can render in most cases. That's why for soft objects like fur and feathers, or things like refections of sun off water I use a two stage sharpening process. I applied it to your first image not to improve it, but to demo how much texture it can pull out when needed:







I made two dupe layers. On the first I sharpened with 500, .2, 0 followed by Fade USM (luminosity) at 70%. That's my default USM for small files I post on the net. I have an action for it and just click it.

On the second dupe layer I sharpened at 500, .3, 0. That over-sharpens. Then I added a black mask and selectively opened it over the flowers. I applied it more aggressively above that I normally would so the max. effect could be seen.

The sharpening reveals their true identity via the texture of the silk blurred in the original


BTW ... you probably need to replace "clever" with "lazy" ... I just stopped by a cemetery prompted by Greg's recent post. Literally, out the door right after I saw his.


For an NT type clever and lazy are pretty much the same thing. It's what's know as "efficiency".



Feb 24, 2012 at 12:22 PM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



RustyBug
Online
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #5 · Silk & Sun


Chuck ... interesting to see you "re-build" detail where I had intentionally allowed it to be diminished. I am using a Kodak DCS SLR/C ... specifically because it does NOT have an AA filter. In this particular case, I allowed for some 'mushing' @ resize to hide some of the texture in the silk.

My original has plenty of detail ... I was actually surprised that the silk pattern didn't SCREAM with moire on these.


For an NT type clever and lazy are pretty much the same thing. It's what's know as "efficiency".
I've been trying for years to get my wife to understand that.

100% crop w/ acr sharp only








Feb 24, 2012 at 01:09 PM
cgardner
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #6 · Silk & Sun


Wow an antique camera! And it's only what about 12 years old? But then digital cameras have lives in dog years.

My second digital in 2000 was this Kodak DC290. My first in 1994 was an Apple Quicktake100 but it wasn't much more than a toy in terms of IQ.






I realized that early DSLR bodies would have a half-life of about 9 months so amused myself with the DC290 and 5MP Minolta D7HI until 2004 when I jumped into the DSLR money pit with a 8MP 20D. Although the DC290 had a small sensor and was only 2.1 MP thanks to the sensor design and a very sharp lens with snappy contrast it took photos with better IQ than Olympus and other 3 MP cameras in the same price range. The added bonuses were the fact it had a PC connector for flash, and a programmable Digita operating system you could customize by writing programs in a language similar to interactive BASIC. So i had fun with it on several levels.

It had a strange quirk due to it's over-sensor filters. Kodak didn't put a UV cut filter over the sensor and when I used it with my Vivitar 285HV flashes things like blue jeans and the gray plastic on my Mac CPU tower would wind up with an odd cyan cast. That didn't occur in daylight or when the built-in flash was used.

I profiled the camera with an IT8 target and the profiling software we used for our drum scanners and discovered the sensor was sensitive to UV beyond the visible spectrum. The camera was reacting to the fluorescence of UV dyes in my jeans and computer with the extra blue energy being rendered as a brighter shade of blue in the photo. The built-in flash didn't create the same problem because Kodak had put a UV cut filter over it. Searching on the net I found a web page at RIT where they were using the DC290 for a lesson on creating camera profiles. Exchanged e-mails with the teacher of the class who confirmed my observations and conclusions.

Kodak created some interesting products and had some very good people working for it, but just was too in-bred in terms of corporate culture to capitalize on the ideas and technology they created.






Feb 24, 2012 at 01:55 PM
RustyBug
Online
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #7 · Silk & Sun


+1 @ Kodak ... Bitter-Sweet.

That reminds me ... I need to try and find some "wicked awesome" batteries for my SLR/c.



Feb 24, 2012 at 07:05 PM





FM Forums | Photo Critique | Join Upload & Sell

    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Retrive password