Home · Register · Search · View Winners · Software · Hosting · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Photo Critique | Join Upload & Sell

  

Archive 2012 · New member would like honest feedback!
  
 
mbpautz762
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · New member would like honest feedback!


Hello! I greatly enjoy this site, especially coming from DPreview, where everyone seems so negative. I am looking for honest feedback from a hodgepodge of a few of my favorite shots from last year. Please don't let the fact that these are my favorites dissuade you from honesty - I cannot learn without having my mistakes pointed out. Enough chatter, here they are:





  NIKON D90    105.0 mm f/2.8 lens    105mm    f/3.0    1/160s    200 ISO    -0.3 EV  






  NIKON D90    105.0 mm f/2.8 lens    105mm    f/2.8    1/80s    200 ISO    -0.3 EV  






  DSLR-A900    16-35mm F2.8 ZA SSM lens    22mm    f/10.0    1/100s    200 ISO    0.0 EV  






  DSLR-A900    16-35mm F2.8 ZA SSM lens    35mm    f/2.8    1/2000s    200 ISO    0.0 EV  



Edited on Feb 20, 2012 at 12:09 AM · View previous versions



Feb 19, 2012 at 11:58 PM
mbpautz762
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · New member would like honest feedback!


ooops...photos are way too big. I will try to fix that


Feb 19, 2012 at 11:59 PM
Bob Jarman
Online
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · New member would like honest feedback!


Welcome!

I think there are more than several FM'ers who have made the same switch.

One of the tendencies of Photo Critique is for others to re-work the OP to illustrate a point or demonstrate a technique, so if you prefer this not be done, you might note either in your profile or when making a post. All re-works are done to provide positive feedback, with an occasional touch of humor added.

Some general comments:

#1 - I find myself drawn to the left side of the image, perhaps if the left were darker, had a gradient applied, or something of that nature?

#2 - I like it. My only suggestion is try doing something with the brown panel/wall - it seems in-congruent with the rest of the image.

#3 - Lovely scenic. Others may suggest pulling some detail from the foreground as well as waves, the softness works for me. There is lighter object (post, person) inside the right edge about half-way up. I think the clone or healing brush to remove it would be helpful.

#4 - I like the strong lines and diagonals. You might explore cropping to remove the dark triangular area at top-right even going so far as to crop immediately below the shadow running horizontally. Find what suits you.

Again welcome aboard,

Regards,

Bob



Feb 20, 2012 at 01:02 AM
sbeme
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · New member would like honest feedback!


1. Agree with Bob. Too much real estate on the left. While I like the concept, I also think you need more of the head on the right.
2. I like the idea of the progressive narrowing of the view. Again, an excellent concept. Where I find it doesnt work so well is in the bottom "panel" where the lights are softly focussed, but more problematically where the sky spaces are crowded out by the distant wall.
Both of these images illustrate your attunement to geometries and experimenting with cropping. Keep at it.
3. Nice job with the sun, exposure, and getting those rays. I agree with Bob about some more shadow detail. I think the image would be stronger if you had the option of a comp with more interest on the right 2/3 of the image. You do have some repetitive shapes of waves and ridges which, again with more shadow detail recovery, may be able to be put to effective use.
4. So you like repetitive elements and throwing the viewer off a bit, breaking some rules? The color and leaf shape against the grill is nice. If you desaturate the grill (I am thinking a bit about Chuck's rework of the broken bottle...party's over image) you will have a stronger effect. The crossing shadows upper left are powerful iconic shapes. And by their location at an upper left third, the eye is especially drawn there. But it ends up competing with the leaf, not integrating the image.
Scott



Feb 20, 2012 at 01:39 AM
mbpautz762
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · New member would like honest feedback!


Thank you both for the break down.....and by the way, I have no problem with re-works. I am not very good at processing/editing, so that is one of the things I would like work with more in the future.


I use lightroom to process and haven't ventured into photoshop very much yet. Do you think the suggestions for #1 (darkening background) would be easier to do in photoshop versus lightroom? I'm not sure how to go about doing those edits in LR.

With #2 and #4, do you feel I could crop those problem parts out without losing any of the photo's feel? I know the question's vague, but I always worry when I do ANY cropping that I am somehow losing something in the photo. I guess I am asking if you would never "miss" the cropped pixels ever again?



Feb 20, 2012 at 01:48 AM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



sbeme
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · New member would like honest feedback!


LR is easy.
PS takes longer to learn.
Both can easily provide the fix. Dont worry about PS now.

Here are two screen captures from LR illustrating a slight change in crop with superimposed Rule of Thirds and a screen showing brush tool settings I used to modify the image. I actually used two brushes. One with reduced exposure and saturation to darken the left half. A second (shown) with near neutral exposure and reduced saturation to take down the color in the lower right.
And a bump in clarity overall provides a more textured, sharper looking surface on the animal's head. A bump in vibrance to bring back more life to the image.
Have to say, I am liking it more now, with Bob's ideas and a few nudges in the rework.

Scott

















Feb 20, 2012 at 01:59 AM
AuntiPode
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · New member would like honest feedback!


As Bob forecast, consider mining something from the deep shade of the third. Also in addition to Scott's suggestion to desaturate the grate a bit, consider adding some vignette.












Feb 20, 2012 at 02:38 AM
cgardner
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · New member would like honest feedback!


A nice set of images. Here's my take on them...







Here the focal points in your original are the eye and nose. The body, to the extent it is seen is a bit of a distraction. Since the nose was low and to the right in the original I cropped to put the eye high and to the left, which forces the viewer to ping-ping up/down the diagonal of the frame where the curve of the jaw bone is seen. To enhance eye contact I added a catchlight.







Often less is more. When shooting and cropping I look for photo element which work as natural frames. Here I felt the balance was better with the lower part cropped out to emphasize the interplay of the curved wires to the upper right corner of the frame.







Very nice sunset shot, nicely composed. There is a huge amount of detail lurking in the 3/4 tones of a RAW file that can be revealed in post-processing in a number of different ways. Above I used adjustment layers and masking so I could selectively control what areas where lightened. White mats around dark photos are huge distractions. Note how the black mat anchors perception of the shadow detail: everything lighter than the 0.0.0 black border will seem to have detail because in a photo the brain equates lighter tone with detail.








This was another case where less is more for me. The message here is conveyed in the organic shape of the leaf vs the pattern of the grate and it doesn't need 20 feet of grate to deliver it. The cross pattern of the shadows, while interesting, competed with what I saw as the more important focal point / messages here so as with any distraction I see I cropped it out.




Feb 20, 2012 at 02:00 PM
mbpautz762
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · New member would like honest feedback!


Thank you all for the advice! I will have to practice some post processing
And it looks like I have to just get over my problem with cropping.

CGardner - what are the "rules" for framing? I imagine each photo is different, but is there a general rule like matching dark frames with dark photos and vice versa?



Feb 21, 2012 at 03:06 AM
cgardner
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · New member would like honest feedback!


mbpautz762 wrote:
CGardner - what are the "rules" for framing? I imagine each photo is different, but is there a general rule like matching dark frames with dark photos and vice versa?


There aren't any "rules". You just need to start with a goal and then find the most effective strategy and tatics to meet it.

The goal in composing a photo is to pull the viewer to one or more focal points. Most composition strategies do this by creating contrast of: tone, sharpness, color, size, shape, etc. But one of the most powerful is tonal contrast.

In terms of cause and effect I try to use the tone of the mat to "push" the viewer toward the contrasting focal point of the photo, and avoid the opposite; having the mat tone tug at the attention of the viewer and pull the eye out of the photo.

On closely cropped shots such as the mule the negative space of the mat can be used to provide compositional balance that would otherwise be lacking. I cropped out the body of the mule that was a distraction and replaced it with the non-distracting, framing negative space of the mat in a similar gray tone. The mat is lighter in tone than the dark focal points of eye and nose in the corners of the image. A black mat would have competed with them, a white one would have also. So in that case something in the middle was ideal.

In your second shot the photo itself created a natural frame. But if I were to mat it I would use a very dark gray one, just a shade lighter than the edge of the photo.

In landscapes the contrast of the sky tends to pull the eye up and out the top of the photo. Surrounding the photo with a darker mat act like the bumper on a billiards table to literally bounce the eye back down to take another look at the darker foreground. The black mat also makes the foreground seem to have more detail by comparison. It's just an optical illusion, but so is seeing 3D in a 2D photo.

When the background of a photo is light it will be the darker and more colorful areas of the photo that become the natural focal point, such as the autumn leaf in your grate shot where the color contrast of the leaf on the neutral tone of the grate pulls the eye to it. To help "push" the eye inward to find it I'll use a lighter mat. For the grate shot I used the eye dropper to sample the gray color from the steel of the grate then adjusted it by eye.

The width of the mat and tone/color are something I adjust by trial and error until I find the balance I'm looking for: one that frames the content of the photo and invites the viewer to dive into the photo rather than tugging their eyes out of it. Start with that goal and then the rest should make sense in the same way you spotlight and object and darken the background around it. or keep the focal point sharp and blur the background. The mat is just an extension of the background, or in the case of a tightly cropped shot like the mule a proxy for the background that has been intentionally omitted with cropping to put more emphasis on the focal point.

When matting photos for hanging on a wall you need to take into account the tone/color of the wall and the viewing distance when selecting the mat. Consider what will be in the field of view when the photo is seen, which will vary with viewing distance. Again keep the goal of pushing/pulling the eye toward the focal point and preventing it from being pulled away from it.



Feb 21, 2012 at 04:54 AM





FM Forums | Photo Critique | Join Upload & Sell

    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Reset password